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My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: miK.
Date: November 09, 2011 06:29PM
I want to fight this and say I don't need them, but I probably do. I'm gonna be 42 in a month.
My concern is that I hear they really take some getting used to. Psychologically, this is also
telling me that I'm getting old, which I understand, but don't need any reminders about.

Any insight from those with these lenses? Positive comments? Non-horror stories?

Thanks!

While cool, I will probably not be getting these...
[www.appleinsider.com]





Sometimes I wonder, "What would Hodor say in this situation?" - Jim Gaffigan

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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: rgG
Date: November 09, 2011 06:37PM
They were not hard for me to get used to at all. I was wearing bifocals in second grade, so poor eyesight des not necessarily have anything to do with age.





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: jdc
Date: November 09, 2011 06:39PM
I skipped them on my last pair and just bought a 3 pack of readers to spread around the house/office. =)

But I probably need them for everyday use now... =(



----


Edited 999 time(s). Last edit at 12:08PM by jdc.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: olnacl
Date: November 09, 2011 06:48PM
I've had progressive lenses for years. I recall trying conventional bifocals first and having a very hard time getting used to them. The progressive lenses, when I got them, provided a smooth transition from distance to near vision and I never went back (except once, because plain bifocals were cheaper - complete waste of money - don't even know where those are, now).
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: swf
Date: November 09, 2011 06:49PM
Have used them for 30+ years with absolutely no problems. My father-in-law was an optometrist for over 50 years. His experience was that those who had the most trouble adjusting to progressive lenses were those who had used bifocals previously.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Black
Date: November 09, 2011 06:52PM
The way my optometrist presented progressives is that they're useful when your eyes are too far gone to adapt easily from the corrected to non-corrected portion of your bifocals. She thought I would be better off without them for now.




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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: lafinfil
Date: November 09, 2011 06:54PM
I've had progressive lenses for 10+ years and the advice that I would give is not all progressive lenses are created equal. It does take some skill to get a proper fit, so don't be afraid to speak up if you are not happy. Also ask your optician about lens options. There are different types so ask them what your options are. If you are willing to spend a little bit more I would look at wavefront (aka freeform) progressive designs. They offer a wider sweet spot less distortion. They are the HiDefs of progressive lenses and worth the money. Also since you work at the computer ask them to take that into consideration when setting distance. Many still use the old "reading the classified ads" distance. Your neck will thank you.



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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: MacArtist
Date: November 09, 2011 07:02PM
I had my first pair of progressives about a year and a half ago.

I went through a couple of days were the walls looked like they were moving. 1st day was the worst.

All in all a smooth transition. I did not wear bifocals prior to getting progressive lenses.



I sit on a man’s back, choking him and making
him carry me, and yet assure myself and others
that I am very sorry for him and wish to ease his
lot by all possible means — except by getting off
his back. - Leo Tolstoy, novelist and Philosopher
(1828-1910)

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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Dennis S
Date: November 09, 2011 07:13PM
I was 42 when I got mine. I fought them until I went on a 3 week trip and left my old ones at home. After a few days, they were fine. I have heard the best way is to put them on first thing in the morning and not just stick them on and try to make a change in the middle of the day.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: miK.
Date: November 09, 2011 07:18PM
Thanks all for your comments.

As a little background, I have never had bifocals, and would be going from regular lenses to progressives.
I do work at the computer some of the day, and then around the office/at useless meetings for the rest.

@ fil : Thanks for the notes on the different types, my doc mentioned the "digital" type and also said
hi-def in there somewhere. I understand there are all types, Varilux being the "Cadillac" I suppose.

@ MacArtist: Yeah, that's pretty much my situation.

@ Dennis: I like your method. I've done that with regular lenses as well.



Sometimes I wonder, "What would Hodor say in this situation?" - Jim Gaffigan





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/09/2011 07:18PM by miK..
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: tenders
Date: November 09, 2011 07:21PM
I'm a couple of months older than you and have had progressive lenses for...a couple of months. I'd been using the same prescription since 1991 (was approximately 20/50 with a bit of astigmatism) but was realizing that it kind of hurt to look at the screen of my digital camera with the glasses on. My vision isn't all that bad and I don't wear glasses at all for reading or using the computer.

I got a new, progressive prescription and middle-of-the-line progressive lenses. These lenses were darn expensive, even with an insurance kick-in, and there wasn't much of an adjustment period for me, but I definitely can't see stuff as clearly out of the periphery of the lenses. I have to turn my head and point directly towards what I want to see.

The bottoms of the lenses, for close-up viewing, are not necessary for a lot of the things I seem to look at when I wear glasses. However, they do get in the way of many long-distance things I do look at. I find them annoying to drive with--I have to tilt my head down slightly to see clearly and get my field of view out of the way of the close-up part of the lens. This head-tilting is necessary even for looking at the controls of the car, GPS, etc. For whatever reason that just isn't close-up viewing for my prescription.

It might be possible to specify lenses with a smaller, lower, close-up portion. But given the small amount of time I expect to spend looking through that portion, and its very high expense, my solution will be to get a non-progressive set for driving, and non-progressive sunglasses. I'll just have one pair of progressives, and if I don't have them on when I'm looking at my digital camera, too bad!

So my advice to you would be NOT to go overboard costwise with your first set, wear them for a few weeks to assess your true needs, and don't get too bummed out about it, it happens to all of us!
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: lafinfil
Date: November 09, 2011 07:32PM
"I understand there are all types, Varilux being the "Cadillac" I suppose."

Don't confuse brands with lens types. Many brands have a number of designs. It has to do with the shape of the sweet spot, or the "corridor" The more expensive wave form types are ground to fit the frame which gives a more forgiving corridor of vision. It is a newer technology that allows it to be used with more frame types too. Many of the older technologies can restrict what frames can be used because of their narrower, less forgiving area of use. Another thing on brand names - many of what we would think to be premium are not. I went through several "good" brands before I found a good fit and it was a brand I was not familiar with. A good doc should be able to explain the pros and cons of which lens would work best for you.



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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: olnacl
Date: November 09, 2011 07:40PM
Quote
tenders
I'm a couple of months older than you and have had progressive lenses for...a couple of months. I'd been using the same prescription since 1991 (was approximately 20/50 with a bit of astigmatism) but was realizing that it kind of hurt to look at the screen of my digital camera with the glasses on. My vision isn't all that bad and I don't wear glasses at all for reading or using the computer.

I got a new, progressive prescription and middle-of-the-line progressive lenses. These lenses were darn expensive, even with an insurance kick-in, and there wasn't much of an adjustment period for me, but I definitely can't see stuff as clearly out of the periphery of the lenses. I have to turn my head and point directly towards what I want to see.

The bottoms of the lenses, for close-up viewing, are not necessary for a lot of the things I seem to look at when I wear glasses. However, they do get in the way of many long-distance things I do look at. I find them annoying to drive with--I have to tilt my head down slightly to see clearly and get my field of view out of the way of the close-up part of the lens. This head-tilting is necessary even for looking at the controls of the car, GPS, etc. For whatever reason that just isn't close-up viewing for my prescription.

It might be possible to specify lenses with a smaller, lower, close-up portion. But given the small amount of time I expect to spend looking through that portion, and its very high expense, my solution will be to get a non-progressive set for driving, and non-progressive sunglasses. I'll just have one pair of progressives, and if I don't have them on when I'm looking at my digital camera, too bad!

So my advice to you would be NOT to go overboard costwise with your first set, wear them for a few weeks to assess your true needs, and don't get too bummed out about it, it happens to all of us!

I had a similar experience with a pair of progressive glasses - they weren't fitted properly. If the lenses/frames are properly fitted, your driving problems will go away unless you're the gansta lean type.

I'd steer clear of discount glasses places in general - many have fitters who are really frame salespersons.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: GuyGene
Date: November 09, 2011 07:41PM
I can't use them. I guess it is different for everyone, but I have to use plain old bifocals.



That old man - he don't think like no old man...
Now I wouldn't want to be within 400 - 500 yards of one of them nuclear bombs when it goes off! WW1 Vet Old Man
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If idiots could fly, this place would be an airport. And I'd be a TSA agent.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: November 09, 2011 07:48PM
Do a lot of research on how the lenses are made. The progressive lenses I got at Costco suck. My regular reading glasses allow me to read edge to edge on my 24" LCD. The reading section of my progressive lenses are only good for a 5" circle. I would rather have gotten regular bifocals than pay a lot more for the high end progressive lenses.

Since I use either reading/regular glasses most of the time, I have not gotten used to the different depth perception wearing progressive lenses and I frequently run into things with my shins.



In tha 360. MRF User Map
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: tortoise
Date: November 09, 2011 08:11PM
At age 67 I finally learned that traditional bifocals are the only glasses that work for me with computer displays. I have a pair of expensive progressive lens glasses that I use for everyday life walking around, driving, grocery shopping and basically everywhere except the computer and reading newspapers and books. For the computer and reading I revert to traditional bifocals (with line) that provide a much larger range of vision across the lenses. I spend at least 8 hours or more in front of computer displays and the progressives just don't cut it for serious computer work. I have been dealing with these vision issues for over twenty years now and that is the solution that has worked out the best for my eyes. Good luck it gets to be a bit tricky finding the optimal solution for each of us.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: guitarist
Date: November 09, 2011 08:13PM
I got progressives, and had heard it's an adjustment for the eyes and the brain, can take up to two weeks to adapt and then like it. And that was somewhat true, in my case. I've tried some over the years i simply don't adapt to, and come back for a different type of material. And others that i adapt to very quickly.

The advantages are overwhelming, though. Since most of my vision correction is reading distance (very poor up-close eyesight) trying to adapt to wearing "readers" was wearing me out. Taking them off, putting them on, dozens of times a day. Losing them. Misplacing them. Not knowing where to hang them on my collar, or shirt, or pocket, when not on my nose. And looking prematurely like an old man, with glasses down on my nose. All that stuff.

Also (and i know that some here insist otherwise, some will disagree) Drug Store readers are are inferior. If up-close eyesight is only moderately bad, I think they're convenient, and you can have more styles, since they're cheap to get extras. It's perhaps not necessary to spend extra on good lenses. But if you depend on good vision, and like precision, better-quality lenses are absolutely noticeable. And worth investing in, if eyesight is poor enough to require significant correction.

Progressives solved a lot of problems, it was a great solution for me. Just putting them on, and leaving them on, is far easier. And being able to drive, and see what's inside the car, as well as outside.

We're fortunate to live in an age when lenses and materials are techniques are advanced, more refined than the earlier days of bifocals. I think a lot of vision is the brain, more than just the organ that receives the visual data. Once the lens type is familiar, it's very beneficial. At least for those of us who respond well to this type of lens. Thumbs up on progressive lenses. Progressives can challenge your eyes and brain to adapt, and once that process is complete, the sweet spot seems to expand, and after a while, it's possible to not even be aware that you're wearing glasses at all.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: haikuman
Date: November 09, 2011 08:26PM
I remember my arms not being long enough to read at 42. Thats when I got my first pair of bifocals.
Later after a period of time many years I tried Progressive's from Costco they were a bitch to get used to.
Truth be told I went back and forth for a few years. My last 2 pairs have been Progressive. This last pair I had made here in the Philippines and they are perfect. They did take a few days to adjust to, but that said love them. Mine are also light sensitive/Photo-chromatic self adjusting in bright sunny days/they auto darken *(:>*

Rudie *(:>*pirate smiley



“Stay Hungry Stay Foolish"
Steve Jobs

"There are only two mantras yum and yuk mine is yum "
Bernard Mickey Wrangle<>Tom Robbins<> "Still Life With Woodpecker"

"There is a fine line between a rut and a groove"
G.D. Kittredge III

"






Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/09/2011 08:27PM by haikuman.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Microman
Date: November 09, 2011 08:43PM
I got progressives many times now and the last time the line that separated it was in the wrong spot and I just couldn't get it right when it night I couldn't see long distances so complained a little bit in Kaiser has a guarantee where you can get them right exchange them finally got them right or there but they work just like regular glasses

First time I had them years and years ago they were definitely hard to get used to but that's right you depending on who manufactures them in your lens people can tell you will you you seem to be good when you get this manufacture so don't let it don't be stuck with the first one

Dictated with Siri, sorry
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: GeneL
Date: November 09, 2011 08:57PM
Great thread!

I'm ready for new lenses and hadn't considered progressives. Years ago, I tried Varilux and was so unhappy with the glasses that I went back to bifocals and never considered progressives again.

All the positive comments have made me think that progressives could be worth trying again.

I'll definitely look into it.

Thanks!



gl @ Dana Point, CA
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: what4
Date: November 09, 2011 08:58PM
I have both bifocals and progressives. I wear the bifocals. I tried and tried the progressives, but have never fully adapted to them.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: lost in space
Date: November 09, 2011 08:59PM
I saw your post title and thought, "Hmmmm... must have just turned 40."

I've used them for about 20 years. The advice about not going discount is spot on. The only lenses I can tolerate are Zeiss. There might be others, but I never encountered them.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: November 09, 2011 09:09PM
Quote
haikuman
I remember my arms not being long enough to read at 42.

That's funny, Rudie - my mom used that very phrase a few days ago when we happened to be discussing my vision. I was telling her that my vision has begun to go south; that's when she cited the "arms not long enough" quip. I told her it wasn't that bad yet - I can still read stuff within 12 inches or so of my eyes. She said that that's pretty damn good for someone my age (46) and that her vision went to hell seemingly the day after she turned 40.



It is what it is.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: SurfMacJpMtb
Date: November 09, 2011 09:11PM
I have had them for at least 10 years. I would have thrown them out the first week but a work friend convinced me to be patient and keep using them full time. It took almost 3 weeks and then I forgot that they were progressive.

My wife tried some but would not listen to my insistence to continue using them.

S



Long time Mac user
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Black
Date: November 09, 2011 09:15PM
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Quote
haikuman
I remember my arms not being long enough to read at 42.

That's funny, Rudie - my mom used that very phrase a few days ago when we happened to be discussing my vision. I was telling her that my vision has begun to go south; that's when she cited the "arms not long enough" quip. I told her it wasn't that bad yet - I can still read stuff within 12 inches or so of my eyes. She said that that's pretty damn good for someone my age (46) and that her vision went to hell seemingly the day after she turned 40.

Did you read in the dark as a kid?




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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: November 09, 2011 09:15PM
Quote
Dennis S
I was 42 when I got mine. I fought them until I went on a 3 week trip and left my old ones at home. After a few days, they were fine. I have heard the best way is to put them on first thing in the morning and not just stick them on and try to make a change in the middle of the day.
EXACTLY my experience. Love them.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Speedy
Date: November 09, 2011 09:17PM
20/50 and you can read without glasses? Perhaps with this size font!

Quote
tenders
I'd been using the same prescription since 1991 (was approximately 20/50 with a bit of astigmatism) ... My vision isn't all that bad and I don't wear glasses at all for reading or using the computer.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: vicrock
Date: November 09, 2011 09:18PM
I've had progressives for over 20 years - the first few days were AWFUL - but as others have said - put them on and wear them - tough through it - the worst thing you can do is alternate between them and a previous prescription.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: November 09, 2011 09:18PM
Quote
Black
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Quote
haikuman
I remember my arms not being long enough to read at 42.

That's funny, Rudie - my mom used that very phrase a few days ago when we happened to be discussing my vision. I was telling her that my vision has begun to go south; that's when she cited the "arms not long enough" quip. I told her it wasn't that bad yet - I can still read stuff within 12 inches or so of my eyes. She said that that's pretty damn good for someone my age (46) and that her vision went to hell seemingly the day after she turned 40.

Did you read in the dark as a kid?

Probably - what does that have to do with anything?



It is what it is.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: iaJim
Date: November 09, 2011 09:40PM
I love them. They are the closest you're going to get to having your young eyes back.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: haikuman
Date: November 09, 2011 10:08PM
Quote
Black
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Quote
haikuman
I remember my arms not being long enough to read at 42.

That's funny, Rudie - my mom used that very phrase a few days ago when we happened to be discussing my vision. I was telling her that my vision has begun to go south; that's when she cited the "arms not long enough" quip. I told her it wasn't that bad yet - I can still read stuff within 12 inches or so of my eyes. She said that that's pretty damn good for someone my age (46) and that her vision went to hell seemingly the day after she turned 40.

Did you read in the dark as a kid?

Are you talking to me. . . ?



I have been in the Dark most of my life pirate smiley




“Stay Hungry Stay Foolish"
Steve Jobs

"There are only two mantras yum and yuk mine is yum "
Bernard Mickey Wrangle<>Tom Robbins<> "Still Life With Woodpecker"

"There is a fine line between a rut and a groove"
G.D. Kittredge III

"


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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Joey Cupcakes
Date: November 09, 2011 10:15PM
I got used to 'em in a couple of days, no problem. Hint: don't cheap out on the lens material. The cheaper ones have problems when you go off center.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: November 09, 2011 10:50PM
I second the notion of avoiding Costco progressives. I tried, they were fairly cheap and and their service was great, but the lenses were poor. I could not get used to them and they suffered from purple fringing, just like a cheap camera lens. And to read my computer, I had to hold my head back at an uncomfortable angle.

But I am mainly a contact lens wearer, because (for me) they have many advantages over wearing glasses. The drawback being that when wearing contacts, I have to fuss with readers. But they give me excellent distance vision and that is important to my photography, and I don't like shooting with glasses. Besides, I can wear cool sunglasses! And no fogging, smears, etc.

I ended up getting two pair of prescription glasses - one mainly for computer and another for my "regular" single vision prescription (from Costco - at no charge to replace the progressives). I end up wearing my computer glasses most of the time around the house, actually. It's not an ideal solution but it suits me.

When I can no longer wear contacts, I will invest in the best progressive lenses I can.



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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: guitarist
Date: November 09, 2011 10:57PM
The adjustment you refer to, at this age (I was 42-44 when i went through it, you're at the right spot to expect this, it doesn't improve, it just declines a little more) is actually TWO adjustments.

One is to the lenses, as discussed here.

The other it just to getting used to wearing glasses, period.

The lenses don't take long. But getting used to glasses is a thing unto itself. Having something on your face, wearing corrective eyewear, can take a year or two, I think. Then maybe another year to settle on the kind or type you like. So you can forget it, it's just invisible, part of your regular experience.

I wonder if other glasses-wearing middle aged guys remember this, adjusting to seeing through glass. That first year, I went nutty cleaning my lenses 50 times a day. I couldn't stand to have a single SPEC of anything on my lenses. I think that was a sign of resisting this new reality. Then, after a year or two, smudgy is okay, or at least, less fussy about it. Anyone else here remember that? Being fussy about the glass being spotless? Not sure if that's a common experience.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: November 09, 2011 11:33PM
....that's PROGRESS for you.....



_____________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: GeneL
Date: November 09, 2011 11:44PM
I didn't see anyone mentioning the best kind of progressive lenses. Brand? Type?

How are they described?

Does anyone have that information to share?

I'm encouraged by the success stories in wearing progressive lenses, but I wouldn't want to invest in them without knowing what kind would give me the best chance of success in wearing them.

The fly in the ointment is that the providers will switch you back to bi-focals without charge, but you don't get a refund of the difference.


Thanks for your thoughts!



gl @ Dana Point, CA
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Buzz
Date: November 10, 2011 01:20AM
Lots of good info here. Don't be afraid to take the plunge. As noted, proper fitment is the key, and it may take a couple of tries to get it right... discuss the options w/ your eye doc and optician. Size and shape of sweet spot alluded to earlier are all important, and your curiosity over getting used to the paradigm is well founded. Think of your first pair as "training" glasses, and proceed cautiously from there. Like Rhonda and others, I had glasses at an early age, and then also had three eye surgeries that helped w/ the vision, but left my eyes overly sensitive, so contacts were never an option, nor is lasik or other newfangled procedures. Progressives have adorned the face for many years, and the right fitment makes the visual world much more bearable. To put things in perspective, a few years ago as the Rx got stronger, I got a new set of progressive lenses to replace the old bifocals for reading on the proverbial throne (when the regular pair are left on the nightstand)... somewhere along the way the alignment got hosed, and one (or both) of the lenses was ground a couple of millimeters out of whack, and the pair was basically useless, as only one eye could/would work properly at a time, so had to get a do over. Had I not been wearing progressives for many years already, and that was my first experience w/ them, it might easily have been my last. Give them a chance, make sure-sure the fitment is good and proper, and take a couple of bites at the apple if needed. And don't give another hoot about the getting old thing. :-)
Good luck.

///



Sometimes it is what it is...
and then there's times when it's really better.



==
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: GeneL
Date: November 10, 2011 02:29AM
Quote
Buzz
…As noted, proper fitment is the key, and it may take a couple of tries to get it right... discuss the options w/ your eye doc and optician. Size and shape of sweet spot alluded to earlier are all important…

The emphasis on "proper fitment" is problematic for me. How do I ensure that I get a "proper fitment?" How is the "size and shape of the sweet spot" determined?

…Think of your first pair as "training" glasses, and proceed cautiously from there....

Okay, you said, "first pair." Does this mean I'd have to go through a number of pairs before they get it right? Who pays for the additional pairs that it takes to get it right?

…somewhere along the way the alignment got hosed, and one (or both) of the lenses was ground a couple of millimeters out of whack, and the pair was basically useless, as only one eye could/would work properly at a time, so had to get a do over…

This seems like another indication that the first pair could easily be "off" and I would be discouraged about using progressive glasses. As a new user of progressives I wouldn't know what was wrong. My provider could easily shift the blame for my not being comfortable with the progressives back to me and simply tell me to go back to bi-focals and I wouldn't know any better.

Can you educate me on how to get a proper fit and what specific kind of lenses should I ask for? Again, who pays if the first pair isn't just right?


…Had I not been wearing progressives for many years already, and that was my first experience w/ them, it might easily have been my last…

This is exactly what I fear…

…but I'd like to get a pair of progressive glasses that really work for me!


… make sure-sure the fitment is good and proper, and take a couple of bites at the apple if needed. Good luck.

Please! I'd really appreciate any assistance you can give me in making this work!

///



gl @ Dana Point, CA
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: miK.
Date: November 10, 2011 06:47AM
Thanks again, all. Great comments. I guess I just don't feel the progressives are necessary (yet).
I haven't felt a decline in reading up close or with distance. In fact, my new rX reads exactly the
same as my 2009 one with the exception of the lens change.

@ guitarist: No issue adjusting to wearing glasses - I've been wearing them every day since I was 6. smiling smiley

@ Wig: I don't plan to go cheap in this case. My eye rX is quite strong, so I am used to paying quite a
bit more than the average Joe for glasses. I have a strong prism in my rX, and have never been able to
wear contacts. As I understand it, this prism also makes me a poor candidate for LASIK.

@ Buzz: I've had a pair that were made wrong before, and knew it immediately. Pearle Vision, who I
used at the time, re-made them when they realized that the rX they filled was off. My only concern
here would be not being able to tell immediately if something were wrong with them due to the transition
to progressives.



Sometimes I wonder, "What would Hodor say in this situation?" - Jim Gaffigan

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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: vicrock
Date: November 10, 2011 07:47AM
It tends to be a shock to adults who have lived with the same prescription for years, to have their prescription change A LOT every year or so as they age.

My distance vision has improved, and my close worsened each year for about 10 year - and my astigmatism changes every year as well.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: November 10, 2011 08:27AM
I never had an adjustment period with progressive lenses. I have had a bad pair and had to take them back to be redone.

Money is a consideration given how much eye glasses can cost, but if you can swing it, an additional pair for computer work might be a good idea.

I like progressives because my environment changes constantly and I need both near and far vision. Swapping glasses is too much of an inconvenience, as would be carrying around two pair of glasses.




When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

Everybody matters or nobody matters.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men except
by believing all possible evil of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

Mister, that's a ten-gallon hat on a twenty-gallon head.

I *love* SIGs. It's Glocks I hate.
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It doesn't bother me that...
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: November 10, 2011 08:34AM
...many people would want to wear the same style glasses as Steve.

Some people would have derogatory remakes to make about that, but it says more about them than fans, or people who've just discovered that particular style/brand.

What really bugs me is the use of his image to commercialize and capitalize under the guise of memoriam.




When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

Everybody matters or nobody matters.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men except
by believing all possible evil of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

Mister, that's a ten-gallon hat on a twenty-gallon head.

I *love* SIGs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: billb
Date: November 10, 2011 08:56AM
Quote
miK.

While cool, I will probably not be getting these...
[www.appleinsider.com]

My sister has rimless half eyes.
They are a bit fragile and really make no sense for someone who is tough on glasses.

( and I can't silver solder the little insert prongs that go into the lens back onto the temples or the nose piece )



The Phorum Wall keeps us safe from illegal characters and words
The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
BOYCOTT YOPLAIT [www.noyoplait.com]
[soundcloud.com]
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: raz
Date: November 10, 2011 10:03AM
Quote
GuyGene
I can't use them. I guess it is different for everyone, but I have to use plain old bifocals.

The un-focus-able part was the first killer for me. With straight bifocals, there's only a tiny line between the near and far parts.

The other killer is that the near part was tiny. I could not see an entire page of a book through it - let alone two 24" monitors. Eventually, I found the magic words for my optometrist "executive bifocals". In that, the reading part goes all the way across the bottom.



--------------

Embarassing myself on the Internet since 1978.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: riley5108
Date: November 10, 2011 10:17AM
mik,

Your situation can get a little more involved than the average Joe when thinking about getting progressive lenses. You'll want someone working with you who understands optics and how to adjust certain measurements like the progressive segment height and your PD (pupillary distance) measurements.

You say you have a strong Prism correction in your Rx and that is very important information. How much prism and if it is Vertical or Horizontal or a combination of both is important. Prism optically moves the progressive lenses segment height if it's Vertical prism and if it's horizontal prism it moves your monocular PD measurement. The rule of thumb is you have to adjust those measurements about .30mm or 1/3 of a mm for every diopter of prism. Believe me it gets a little complicated and you would want to discuss this with your Optometrist.

Here's a link to a paper I help write back in the 1990's but it's only an abstract and does not contain some important information. I no longer have a copy or I could send it to you.

[www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Hope this helps.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Janit
Date: November 10, 2011 12:02PM
Quote
tortoise
At age 67 I finally learned that traditional bifocals are the only glasses that work for me with computer displays. I have a pair of expensive progressive lens glasses that I use for everyday life walking around, driving, grocery shopping and basically everywhere except the computer and reading newspapers and books. For the computer and reading I revert to traditional bifocals (with line) that provide a much larger range of vision across the lenses. I spend at least 8 hours or more in front of computer displays and the progressives just don't cut it for serious computer work. I have been dealing with these vision issues for over twenty years now and that is the solution that has worked out the best for my eyes. Good luck it gets to be a bit tricky finding the optimal solution for each of us.

I do much the same. Progressives for everyday life and bifocals for work. The bifocals have the upper pane set for computer distance and the lower pane for reading. I have worn glasses since I was eight, so my brain has had a lot pf practice accommodating to new prescriptions.

If your correction is at all complex or extreme, I recommend finding an optometrist or optician with a taste for problem-solving. I had some serious issues with headaches etc in the past, all of which were a result of incorrectly fabricated lenses. My original practitioner (an ophthalmologist) said it must be that I was not suited to wearing progressives. The second practitioner I went to had the patience to figure out that the lenses had been badly fabricated -- like really botched.

Remember that ophthalmologists are surgeons at heart and they are often bored with the eye-refraction side of their practice. On the other hand a good optometrist or optician may just love to delve into all those geeky numbers to figure out how to make your glasses work for you.

Edit for those of you who wonder about the details: the botched glasses had the optical centers of the lenses misaligned along the vertical direction, resulting in the equivalent of a vertical prismatic imbalance. It was a nightmare trying to figure this out, as the ophthalmologist just wanted to move me over to bifocals and forget about it. I said no -- I figured the problem was with the fabrication, since I had already worn progressives for 5 years previously. I ended up setting my bathroom up as a mini do-it-myself vision-testing chamber and took my observations to a couple different practitioners. Finally I found an optometrist who looked at my data and said "Oh, this sounds just like a final exam question," as though that was a GOOD thing. Between us, we got me a new set of lenses that were properly made.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 11/10/2011 12:36PM by Janit.
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: Buzz
Date: November 10, 2011 02:49PM
I'm guessing that relying on a reputable eye doc and optician are key. Get recommendations from others that have had success, and get their stories of what it took to achieve it. It goes back many years, but my first attempt at progressives wasn't fun; supposedly everything was correct, but they just didn't work right no matter how many beers, or shots of single malt I had (just kidding). The persistent optician had the lenses remade w/ equally poor results, then again w/ a different style of sweet spot (width, and pattern of transition from distance to reading), and that made all the difference in the world; I was hooked, and pun intended, haven't looked back since. As many have noted, there are several variables that have to be accounted for, and is clearly a mixture of science and art, that is absolutely worthwhile when everything falls into place properly. I don't know what the key is to avoiding pitfalls, but as others noted, small tolerances greatly, or gravely affect results. IOW, there is an adjustment period to start with, and if something is off, the better you can articulate your experience, the better job the eye care professionals will be able to do to accommodate your specific needs. That's why I suggest getting solid recommendations before jumping in.

///



Sometimes it is what it is...
and then there's times when it's really better.



==
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Re: My eye Doc is recommending progressive lenses...
Posted by: guitarist
Date: November 10, 2011 07:02PM
I didn't see anyone mentioning the best kind of progressive lenses. Brand? Type?

This part is tricky, because people have individual differences that account for what types do or don't work well for them.

And they keep coming up with new formulas, better, more refined types, some that are more expensive. I can't keep track! There are too many kinds now.

I turned out to get best results with a kind that's on the less expensive scale.

When I tried some fancy new kind, I didn't respond well. Everything looked like I was 20 feet tall, felt like I would tip over. An optical distortion. I didn't even wait to give myself time to adjust, it was too radical, my eyes didn't like it!

You might ask for whichever type is most popular and has the most satisfied customers.
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