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Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: space-time
Date: July 14, 2012 04:07PM
we found this little baby bird in sidewalk, obviously lost or perhaps even sick. I shoot a few pictures before I tried to protect it as the poor creature was crossing the street (luckily no cars came) and finally it squeezed under a gate into somebody's yard.

I would like to know what bird it is. I tried google image search and I don't think the results make sense



So here I am hoping someone one MRF can identify it. FWIW, this was in Romania (in the unlikely case it's a species present in Europe but not in North America)

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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: July 14, 2012 04:33PM
A little sparrow maybe?
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: July 14, 2012 04:38PM
Beak looks robin-like.
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: modelamac
Date: July 14, 2012 05:09PM
I'd guess a European sparrow. Should be plenty of adults around to compare with - color and size. Probably a wing injury, which would lead to starvation, eventually.



Remember how when you were little
you could just rip off your diaper and
just run around naked and everyone
thought it was so cute and funny?


Anyway, I need bail money.
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: DP
Date: July 14, 2012 05:49PM
That's the one thing I hate about Spring-seeing the youngins that won't make it. I was driving down my street and there was a small dot in the street. It was a young robin that was lost and I scooted it out of the street-didn't touch although it was looking at me like I was it's parents. I hope there was a good outcome but that's heartbreaking to see.
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: Acer
Date: July 14, 2012 06:16PM
I agree the beak looks American Robin-ish. American Robins are in the thrush family; what Europeans call robins are not thrushes.

Anyway, check Song Thrush.

[en.wikipedia.org]

I don't know any more about them than what I just read in the wiki, but there's a pic of a juvenile similar to the OP pic.
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: deckeda
Date: July 14, 2012 06:21PM
African or European swallow?
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: bruceko
Date: July 14, 2012 06:34PM
Baby Starling?
Starling



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/14/2012 06:40PM by bruceko.
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: OWC Jamie
Date: July 14, 2012 09:25PM
Laden or unladen swallow?

Looks like a robin to me as well.



Good Luck!
Jamie Dresser
Other World Computing
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: rgG
Date: July 14, 2012 09:48PM
Quote
deckeda
African or European swallow?

That is what I was waiting for!





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: RgrF
Date: July 14, 2012 11:17PM
The scowl might tend to make it either Eastern European rural or Parisian urban.
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: decay
Date: July 15, 2012 07:03AM
Quote
deckeda
African or European swallow?

are you suggesting coconuts migrate?



---
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Re: Google Failed. Maybe MRF can help?
Posted by: mrlynn
Date: July 15, 2012 04:11PM
I sent the link to my daughter, Sarah. She writes,

Quote

James and I agree it looks like an American Robin relative. It looks very much like a fledgling European blackbird, which is in the same genus as the American Robin (Turdus), and is also likely because it is so very common. Here's a photo we found on Google:

[www.wildliferanger.co.uk]

However, looking at the checklist for birds of Romania, they have 7 species in the genus Turdus, and they might look similar as fledglings. There are also other members of the thrush family that it could be but we still think the blackbird is a pretty good bet.

Also a couple general points:

"FWIW, this was in Romania (in the unlikely case it's a species present in Europe but not in North America)"

Not really unlikely, since there are a great many birds present in Europe that would not be found in North America, and vice versa. We were just comparing the bird species checklist for Romania to the Eastern North American birds with which we are familiar. It is very interesting. There is actually more overlap than I would have expected in some groups of birds. The usual field guides don't discuss worldwide distribution, just distribution within the range of the guide, so this information is often overlooked.

"Probably a wing injury, which would lead to starvation, eventually."

That bird looks like a recent fledgling, which is not yet ready to fly. It might be able to flutter up to a low branch but not more than that. Many bird species routinely leave the nest before they can fly, and their parents continue to feed them while they hide out in bushes, etc. If you see a fledgling like this that is not flying, but otherwise looks all right, just let it alone. It's fine. If it's in immediate danger from a road, or a cat, you can move it a short distance but don't take it very far because it still needs its parents, and they are probably close by. If you just take it across the road or whatever, it will peep and the parents will find it.


/Mr Lynn



"Hillbilly at Harvard"
Honky-tonk Country and Bluegrass
Founded in 1948 by Pappy Ben Minnich
Saturdays 9am - 1pm Eastern
WHRB-FM, Cambridge, MA
Streaming at [www.WHRB.org]
Be there!

The HAH weblog: [hillbillyatharvard.wordpress.com]

Topical weblog: [walkingcreekworld.wordpress.com]

On the river in Saxonville.
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