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Power tool question
Posted by: Lizabeth
Date: August 24, 2014 03:26PM
Pulled out my Ryobi power drill to a DIY standing computer desk hack. It's plugged in at the moment to juice up the battery. It's been sitting in it's case for awhile.

The Problem: the grip is really really sticky and I don't remember it being like that the last time I used it. The hard plastic parts are fine.

Is this something that can be fixed and if is how????

The Ryobi website requires you to set up an account to email them and missed their service hours for today to call. Will call tomorrow but figured somebody here would have an answer or fix.

Thanks...
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: eustacetilley
Date: August 24, 2014 03:38PM
The old Folklore cure for this was as follows:
Scrub with hot soap and water.
Once dry, work in some reasonably strong and pure alcohol.
Then massage with Talc. Not the fragrant kind, unless you like fragrances.

Why this works has a lot to do with the Chemistry and Physical Properties of all sorts of natural and synthetic Rubber compounds.
What is in the grip of your Ryobi is open to speculation.
But the course that I suggest shouldn't hurt. Much.

Eustace
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: space-time
Date: August 24, 2014 04:40PM
Did you store it in a car or other place that gets very hot?

Also depending on what battery is has, and how long it has been storred, it may or may not hold a charge.
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: Ammo
Date: August 24, 2014 04:51PM
I'm sure Eustace meant to add that if you do wash the grip, make sure that you don't let any water leak into the drill housing itself.



Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. —Wendy Mass

Until you make your unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate. - Carl Jung
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: Lizabeth
Date: August 24, 2014 04:52PM
Nope...it was in the house tucked in the clothes closet.
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: Lizabeth
Date: August 24, 2014 04:53PM
Quote
Ammo
I'm sure Eustace meant to add that if you do wash the grip, make sure that you don't let any water leak into the drill housing itself.

Definitely!
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: eustacetilley
Date: August 25, 2014 05:46AM
Quote
Lizabeth
Quote
Ammo
I'm sure Eustace meant to add that if you do wash the grip, make sure that you don't let any water leak into the drill housing itself.

Definitely!

Oh very definitely, but the precaution applies even more to the Alcohol.
Water and sparks generally don't mix, but Alcohol and sparks mix very nicely indeed.
Oh, another precaution, don't do any of this, except for maybe the Talc part, while the drill is plugged in.

Eustace
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: Lizabeth
Date: August 25, 2014 07:42AM
Quote
eustacetilley
Quote
Lizabeth
Quote
Ammo
I'm sure Eustace meant to add that if you do wash the grip, make sure that you don't let any water leak into the drill housing itself.

Definitely!

Oh very definitely, but the precaution applies even more to the Alcohol.
Water and sparks generally don't mix, but Alcohol and sparks mix very nicely indeed.
Oh, another precaution, don't do any of this, except for maybe the Talc part, while the drill is plugged in.

Eustace

Double definitely smiling smiley

Just "talked" to a Ryobi rep on the phone. The grip breaks down if it's been in heat for long periods of time, which I get. BUT I'm wondering HOW this one's grip is doing that since it was stored in the house where the temp doesn't jump all over the place???? They suggested washing it like you did and/or ordering another casing for it. And searching their website there's no parts listing for the model (of course!) and even if the part was available it would probably cost more than the price I paid for the drill. I bought it about 10 years ago - lesson learned: invest in tools with lifetime warrenties AND hang onto the store receipt forever.

Will try your suggestion and see what happens since I've got nothing to lose by it. If that doesn't work I'll probably wrap the grip in designer duck tape and call it a day smiling smiley
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: DRR
Date: August 25, 2014 08:22AM
Most Ryobi power drills are dirt cheap on ebay - as low as $10 or so. People buy the kits for the batteries and sell off the tools that they don't need. The market is flooded with those drills.
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: eustacetilley
Date: August 25, 2014 09:16AM
Designer Duct tape is the way to go. Show up at a jobsite with a drill wrapped in Designer Duct tape, and missing a couple of fingers, and you are Good To Go.

Actually, I'm going to get a bit serious now, which means that I'm going to be boring.
It may appear that I was just passing along old Folklore, but the fact of the matter is, there is a lot of Science behind it. Actually, some cutting-edge Science.

The Ryobi rep was right- a thorough cleaning is first in order. What may appear first to be a material defect, may actually turn out to be something much simpler. I don't recommend drilling into a beehive, (Does anybody?), but what may initially appear to be disgusting goo may merely be oxidizing Honey.

The use of Alcohol, other than the recreational possibilities, is long established in Research circles. 190 proof Ethanol, (The 200 proof stuff is utter rubbish, and it isn't even 200 proof.), has two very significant properties- it's a pretty good solvent for things that tends to make things sticky, and it is a drier. Pay attention to that last word- pretty pure alcohol sucks moisture out of things, to be then rubbed away. We went through gallons of the stuff at a time, wiping down the Resonator tanks, just to get rid of the absorbed moisture. It was a heady experience.
Wash first, and then employ Alcohol liberally, and wipe, wipe, wipe. Don't use such things as Acetone- they only make things worse.

It's a shame that not much recent attention has been paid to Talc. ( Hydrated Magnesium Silicate). What Talc does when in intimate contact with Organic or Synthetic Rubber is this: It retards the inevitable journey from Rubber Carbon to Rubber Carbon Dioxide, because it is so clingy. (This is really a neat thing to watch, under an Electron Microscope. Talc on one side, no Talc on the other. The resolution is pretty poor, because a stream of Oxygen needs to be passed over the samples, but the growth of the microscopic unTalced fissures is pretty rapid.) Of course, Talc is macroscopically Hydrophobic.
There have been attempts to duplicate the properties of Talc, usually involving Fluorinated Silicates, but the fact of the matter is, Talc is far too common, and preposterously cheap, and unless a fragrance is added, unpatentable.


*******
All this is boring, and I didn't give any references, but that would have made it even more boring. This is one of those overthink areas, because Duct Tape actually is available in designer Colors:


Eustace
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Re: Power tool question
Posted by: Lizabeth
Date: August 25, 2014 11:19AM
Interesting read..references not needed!

Will post after cleaning the drill.
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