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The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: space-time
Date: October 15, 2014 07:37PM
A Wells Fargo employee in Portland, Oregon, thinks he and his co-workers deserve a raise - and he wants everyone to know.

Tyrel Oates, who works in the bank's collections department, spent two weeks gathering more than 200,000 email addresses of fellow employees. He then cc-ed them in a message asking Wells Fargo head John Stumpf to help address income inequality in the US.

[www.bbc.com]
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: vision63
Date: October 15, 2014 07:41PM
Cool
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: October 15, 2014 07:47PM
Raises for everybody! Just like how they returned everybody's homes that they repossessed improperly!



In tha 360. MRF User Map
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Speedy
Date: October 15, 2014 07:47PM




Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: October 15, 2014 07:54PM
"Just wait for karma you fool" --- Satya Nadella, Microsoft CEO



Ways to improve web conference image and sound quality. [forums.macresource.com]


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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: hal
Date: October 15, 2014 07:56PM
Capitalism doesn't work that way. It's easy for workers to point out huge CEO salaries and profits and demand a share of them, but the workers aren't sharing the risk. In 2009, WF lost $2.5B in a it's first quarter (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/29/business/29wells.html) - I didn't hear anything about the workers wanting to pitch in and help then, did you?

I hope this guy has an independent means of living, because this job isn't gonna be there for long. Is ass is gonna get fired.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/15/2014 07:56PM by hal.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: The UnDoug
Date: October 15, 2014 08:05PM
I'm shocked that the email servers let him cc 200,000 people!!! Our servers (Gmail Apps for Education) limit us to *maybe* a couple thousand, I think)



[www.zeemaps.com]
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Acer
Date: October 15, 2014 08:11PM
Quote
hal
Capitalism doesn't work that way. It's easy for workers to point out huge CEO salaries and profits and demand a share of them, but the workers aren't sharing the risk. In 2009, WF lost $2.5B in a it's first quarter (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/29/business/29wells.html) - I didn't hear anything about the workers wanting to pitch in and help then, did you?

I don't recall the CEO pitching in, either. Just sayin'.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Speedy
Date: October 15, 2014 08:11PM
Quote
The UnDoug
I'm shocked that the email servers let him cc 200,000 people!!! Our servers (Gmail Apps for Education) limit us to *maybe* a couple thousand, I think)

That volume would bring a lot of email servers down. He may have not cc'ed them but spaced out a number of mass emails by a few seconds. Of course, Wells Fargo can afford a very robust email system.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: October 15, 2014 08:18PM
Quote
The UnDoug
I'm shocked that the email servers let him cc 200,000 people!!! Our servers (Gmail Apps for Education) limit us to *maybe* a couple thousand, I think)

I wonder if there was a burst of Reply All back and forth.

"STOP DOING REPLY ALL!!!"



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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: hal
Date: October 15, 2014 08:32PM
Quote
Acer
Quote
hal
Capitalism doesn't work that way. It's easy for workers to point out huge CEO salaries and profits and demand a share of them, but the workers aren't sharing the risk. In 2009, WF lost $2.5B in a it's first quarter (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/29/business/29wells.html) - I didn't hear anything about the workers wanting to pitch in and help then, did you?

I don't recall the CEO pitching in, either. Just sayin'.

No, but he was no longer CEO in 2010...

I'm just sayin, that if you want capitalism, deal with it - be a cog in the machine and be happy with it. If you DON'T (and the emailer seems to have a problem with it) then act to retire it in favor of something better. Don't just ask for money.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: hal
Date: October 15, 2014 08:34PM
Quote
pRICE cUBE
Quote
The UnDoug
I'm shocked that the email servers let him cc 200,000 people!!! Our servers (Gmail Apps for Education) limit us to *maybe* a couple thousand, I think)

I wonder if there was a burst of Reply All back and forth.

"STOP DOING REPLY ALL!!!"

No KIDDING! When I worked in a large nat'l company, anyone replying en masse got into trouble. Anyone actively seeking out ALL mail addresses for the purpose of sending a company-wide broadcast would be fired the same day.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Paul F.
Date: October 15, 2014 08:37PM
Quote
hal
Quote
Acer
Quote
hal
Capitalism doesn't work that way. It's easy for workers to point out huge CEO salaries and profits and demand a share of them, but the workers aren't sharing the risk. In 2009, WF lost $2.5B in a it's first quarter (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/29/business/29wells.html) - I didn't hear anything about the workers wanting to pitch in and help then, did you?

I don't recall the CEO pitching in, either. Just sayin'.

No, but he was no longer CEO in 2010...

I'm just sayin, that if you want capitalism, deal with it - be a cog in the machine and be happy with it. If you DON'T (and the emailer seems to have a problem with it) then act to retire it in favor of something better. Don't just ask for money.


If you learn to be a better, more efficient, more useful cog, you get more money... not if you just whine a lot.



Paul F.
-----
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca c. 5 BC - 65 AD
----
Good is the enemy of Excellent. Talent is not necessary for Excellence.
Persistence is necessary for Excellence. And Persistence is a Decision.

--

--

--
Eureka, CA
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: space-time
Date: October 15, 2014 08:38PM
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Speedy
Date: October 15, 2014 08:40PM
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Ammo
Date: October 15, 2014 08:54PM
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

Perhaps the pendulum will start to swing the other way again.



Where is there dignity unless there is also honesty? - Cicero

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. —Wendy Mass
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: davester
Date: October 15, 2014 09:16PM
Quote
Acer
Quote
hal
Capitalism doesn't work that way. It's easy for workers to point out huge CEO salaries and profits and demand a share of them, but the workers aren't sharing the risk. In 2009, WF lost $2.5B in a it's first quarter (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/29/business/29wells.html) - I didn't hear anything about the workers wanting to pitch in and help then, did you?

I don't recall the CEO pitching in, either. Just sayin'.

agree smiley

A huge problem with american companies is that CEO pay no longer tracks company success. The boards have largely insulated themselves from the shareholders and simply award pay raises to each other no matter how profitable the companies are. Sure, there are a few exceptions, but this is the general rule these days.



"In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion." (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Black
Date: October 15, 2014 09:26PM
Quote
hal
s ass is gonna get fired.
The obvious assumption is that he realized that. Will be entertaining if he doesn't get fired.




New forum user map 8/2015: [www.zeemaps.com]
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: anonymouse1
Date: October 15, 2014 09:29PM
Sure. Because those two could never possibly overlap...
Quote
hal
Quote
Acer
Quote
hal
Capitalism doesn't work that way. It's easy for workers to point out huge CEO salaries and profits and demand a share of them, but the workers aren't sharing the risk. In 2009, WF lost $2.5B in a it's first quarter (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/29/business/29wells.html) - I didn't hear anything about the workers wanting to pitch in and help then, did you?

I don't recall the CEO pitching in, either. Just sayin'.

No, but he was no longer CEO in 2010...

I'm just sayin, that if you want capitalism, deal with it - be a cog in the machine and be happy with it. If you DON'T (and the emailer seems to have a problem with it) then act to retire it in favor of something better. Don't just ask for money.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: M A V I C
Date: October 15, 2014 09:57PM
If you think your hard work should be rewarded by profit sharing, I think the time to negotiate for that is during the hiring process. One company I interviewed at was rather large, and the level I was interviewing at was a notch (or two?) too low to get stock. Maybe some of the other perks of the job would have made it worth it, but the choice to take such a job was mine to make.




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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: mrlynn
Date: October 15, 2014 10:28PM
Quote
hal
I'm just sayin, that if you want capitalism, deal with it - be a cog in the machine and be happy with it. If you DON'T (and the emailer seems to have a problem with it) then act to retire it in favor of something better. Don't just ask for money.

What's "better"—a cog in the machine of the State?

And, since when does capitalism require you to become "a cog in the machine"? Most of the business in this country is small business, and there's nothing to prevent you from starting out on your own. That's the genius of capitalism—and freedom.

/Mr Lynn



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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: DRR
Date: October 15, 2014 10:39PM
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

In a pure capitalist economy, no they do not happen. But the United States is not a pure capitalist economy.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Racer X
Date: October 15, 2014 11:08PM
98% of the businesses in the US are less than 100 employees.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: davester
Date: October 15, 2014 11:15PM
Quote
Racer X
98% of the businesses in the US are less than 100 employees.

Do you have backup for that statement?



"In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion." (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: kj
Date: October 15, 2014 11:22PM
Quote
Racer X
98% of the businesses in the US are less than 100 employees.

That's a weird stat, in that 2% of the businesses could still employ almost everybody. kj.

p.s. those weeners at WF collections ruthlessly hounded me (erroneously) with machine-made calls, for years, I tell ya. They'll get no support from me!
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Racer X
Date: October 16, 2014 12:14AM
Quote
davester
Quote
Racer X
98% of the businesses in the US are less than 100 employees.

Do you have backup for that statement?

[www.census.gov] It has been just over 98% for decades.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/16/2014 12:19AM by Racer X.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: davester
Date: October 16, 2014 12:28AM
Ah, now I see. It's just one of those misleading and meaningless statistics (see the book "How to Lie With Statistics"). Since most of the "businesses" in the US are single persons, then they can still be a drop in the bucket but make up 98% of firms.



"In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion." (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: space-time
Date: October 16, 2014 05:52AM
Quote
DRR
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

In a pure capitalist economy, no they do not happen. But the United States is not a pure capitalist economy.

Can you name a pure capitalist economy?
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Speedy
Date: October 16, 2014 06:15AM
Quote
space-time
Quote
DRR
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

In a pure capitalist economy, no they do not happen. But the United States is not a pure capitalist economy.

Can you name a pure capitalist economy?

Any country where bribery of public officials is rampant. That would probably about half the countries in the world.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: wowzer
Date: October 16, 2014 06:26AM
Quote
space-time
Quote
DRR
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

In a pure capitalist economy, no they do not happen. But the United States is not a pure capitalist economy.

Can you name a pure capitalist economy?

China. :-)



All I ever really needed to know, I learned from watching Star Trek.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: Lux Interior
Date: October 16, 2014 08:39AM
Quote
hal
but the workers aren't sharing the risk.

Tell that to the bank employees who lost their jobs when banks failed in the 2008 financial crisis.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: October 16, 2014 08:57AM
Good interview with the guy.

[www.businessinsider.com]

He does say something odd... "Wells Fargo does not permit the formation of Unions".... I expect the Unions and the EEOC to go bananas over that one. Employers are specifically forbidden from 'not allowing' union organization. In fact there is a limited set of discouragements that employers are allowed to engage in.. mostly 'We don't like it but you are free to organize' statements.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: DRR
Date: October 16, 2014 09:22AM
It's a really interesting story, but you have to ask yourself, from the company's perspective, what would the return on the $3 billion investment in increased employee salaries actually going to be?

Some positive press, but certainly not $3b worth.
Slight increase in public perception.
Some decreased employee attrition.
Probably no change in productivity.

And then their stock price would nosedive because they made an investment with virtually no tangible return.

IF the guys' end game is publicity for himself, then bravo to him because he's accomplished that in spades. If he had any other goal in mind, he failed miserably.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: DRR
Date: October 16, 2014 09:23AM
Also you have to wonder what the WF PR team is thinking now. How they can spin this and save the company a little face, all while realizing that work runs counter to the amount of money in their individual bank accounts.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: rjmacs
Date: October 16, 2014 11:13AM
Quote
DRR
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

In a pure capitalist economy, no they do not happen. But the United States is not a pure capitalist economy.

Are you nuts? Capitalism naturally gives rise to unions, which are a completely logical response to management's monopoly on power. Have you not read your Marx?



rj
AKA
Vreemac, Moth of the Future
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: eustacetilley
Date: October 16, 2014 12:17PM
Quote
rjmacs
Quote
DRR
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

In a pure capitalist economy, no they do not happen. But the United States is not a pure capitalist economy.

Are you nuts? Capitalism naturally gives rise to unions, which are a completely logical response to management's monopoly on power. Have you not read your Marx?

I'm a little behind the Marx, but I have recently been re-reading my Pirenne: "Economic and Social History of Medieval Europe" (1936).

Trade Unions, as we know them, preceded Capitalism, as we know it, in the form of Trade Guilds.
The Guilds had good and bad points- they existed arguably, and this was argued about alot, as a form of Consumer Protection. If you needed Buttons, there were only a number of local Button-Makers, and they all belonged to the local Guild Of Button-Makers. This was supposed to be a Warrant of Quality, and they were Regulated by whatever Government existed. But it also kept Competition out, either Locally, or Regionally.
A System evolved: Master Button-Makers, and if they were successful, they had their Apprentices. This too was Regulated, and exists in one form or another today.

So what was going on with Capitalism in the 12th Century in Europe? Not much. The Accumulation of Capital, and lending it out for a Profit, was theoretically illegal. It was Usury, and considered a Bad Thing.
There were ways around this; there always are.
The Accumulation of Capital also had another problem- Counterfeiting. A Counterfeit Button wasn't much of an issue- just cut a hand off of the Offender. But how can one trust a Coin? That was all that existed in Capital back then; no Paper Money, no Credit.
This was a Historic Problem- just think about the Tale Of Archimedes, and his Bathtub. The reason that the tale is still told is that, before more modern methods were developed, Gold and Silver displaced a defined amount of Water for a defined Weight, and thus some Assay of Worth could be made.

Pirenne spends a lot of time devoted to Counterfeiting in this work. Only once Trust was established could Credit be worked out. Other means of Capital, mainly Slaves and Land, were too Fungible; Slaves die, Land can simply be taken at the point of a sword, or with a peevish Royal Writ.
As long as one can trust a King, one can trust the issues of the Royal Mint. Still, there was a lot of mistrust.

Pirenne is a much better writer than Marx. I'm reading him on processed wood pulp, but there are online versions available.

¬Eustace
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: rjmacs
Date: October 16, 2014 01:38PM
Quote
eustacetilley
Quote
rjmacs
Quote
DRR
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

In a pure capitalist economy, no they do not happen. But the United States is not a pure capitalist economy.

Are you nuts? Capitalism naturally gives rise to unions, which are a completely logical response to management's monopoly on power. Have you not read your Marx?

I'm a little behind the Marx, but I have recently been re-reading my Pirenne: "Economic and Social History of Medieval Europe" (1936).

Trade Unions, as we know them, preceded Capitalism, as we know it, in the form of Trade Guilds.
The Guilds had good and bad points- they existed arguably, and this was argued about alot, as a form of Consumer Protection. If you needed Buttons, there were only a number of local Button-Makers, and they all belonged to the local Guild Of Button-Makers. This was supposed to be a Warrant of Quality, and they were Regulated by whatever Government existed. But it also kept Competition out, either Locally, or Regionally.
A System evolved: Master Button-Makers, and if they were successful, they had their Apprentices. This too was Regulated, and exists in one form or another today.

So what was going on with Capitalism in the 12th Century in Europe? Not much. The Accumulation of Capital, and lending it out for a Profit, was theoretically illegal. It was Usury, and considered a Bad Thing.
There were ways around this; there always are.
The Accumulation of Capital also had another problem- Counterfeiting. A Counterfeit Button wasn't much of an issue- just cut a hand off of the Offender. But how can one trust a Coin? That was all that existed in Capital back then; no Paper Money, no Credit.
This was a Historic Problem- just think about the Tale Of Archimedes, and his Bathtub. The reason that the tale is still told is that, before more modern methods were developed, Gold and Silver displaced a defined amount of Water for a defined Weight, and thus some Assay of Worth could be made.

Pirenne spends a lot of time devoted to Counterfeiting in this work. Only once Trust was established could Credit be worked out. Other means of Capital, mainly Slaves and Land, were too Fungible; Slaves die, Land can simply be taken at the point of a sword, or with a peevish Royal Writ.
As long as one can trust a King, one can trust the issues of the Royal Mint. Still, there was a lot of mistrust.

Pirenne is a much better writer than Marx. I'm reading him on processed wood pulp, but there are online versions available.

¬Eustace

All true and interesting stuff, per usual, Eustace - but, the 'modern' labor union (let's say, over the last 165 years or so) really doesn't resemble the trade guilds much at all. Interestingly, there are plenty of modern guilds that continue to operate - electricians, plumbers, etc. still have extensive Master/Apprentice programs. And they have become quite connected to labor unions, but they exist as a hybrid, not a progenitor. The modern labor union came about specifically in response to industrialization and the creation of a system in which the means of production were owned by the Capitalist, and the labor required to operate those means was rendered by the Proletarian. This sets up a system of exchange in which one party acquires and controls wealth through the cooperation of another party which is more immediately dependent on the relationship for its survival. That is to say, the factory owner can shut down a factory for a month and continue to eat; the factory worker may not be able to live that long without work. In addition, labor becomes largely a matter of unskilled bodies doing generic work, which means that workers are both expendable and replaceable, and therefore more easily manipulable/exploitable. Labor unions grow out of the recognition that if proletarians act in concert (solidarity), they can exert leverage as a group that none could manage as a single worker. It's a completely logical development in the Capitalist model, wherein each actor acts in his own self interest to further his aims [this is gendered, so i'll use male pronouns]. It makes NO sense for a Proletarian to act as an individual agent. It's almost nonsensical, because he will always lose in a one-on-one contest with the Capitalist.



rj
AKA
Vreemac, Moth of the Future
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: DRR
Date: October 16, 2014 10:25PM
Quote
rjmacs
Quote
DRR
Quote
Speedy
Quote
space-time
so strikes asking for better work conditions, better benefits and better wages do not happen in a capitalist economy?

They used to, not so much anymore.

In a pure capitalist economy, no they do not happen. But the United States is not a pure capitalist economy.

Are you nuts? Capitalism naturally gives rise to unions, which are a completely logical response to management's monopoly on power. Have you not read your Marx?

In a pure capitalist economy (which is really just the stuff of economic theory), workers who organize and strike, are probably going to be replaced for cheaper, if that's an option for management.

If they're not cheaply replaceable, then management will cave and cede more pay/benefits because they can't run a business without that specialized labor. But that's only because the workers were underpaid to begin with.

Like nature, economies abhor a vacuum.
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Re: The employee who asked for a $10,000 raise - and cc-ed 200,000 coworkers
Posted by: DRR
Date: October 16, 2014 10:27PM
oops



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/16/2014 10:27PM by DRR.
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