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Concrete question
Posted by: h'
Date: January 10, 2006 09:23PM
Addressed partially to those who respnded back in the old country:

[forums.dealmac.com]

The garage was demo'd yesterday and the concrete was poured today. It's in the mid/upper 30s in Chicago and supposed to climb into the upper 40s over the next 2-3 days.

My question-- should they have covered the new pour with straw? Or something else for temperature? There's a huge sheet of plastic only.

Thanks!



I suffer from the same sensitivity that you do. A few nuggets of wisdom were shared with me and I'm "trying" to incorporate them into my life. First, remember that nobody can hurt your feelings unless you let them. You can always reject what is being forced on you emotionally.
Second, nothing changes unless you change it. If you don't want the behavior to be repeated then you need to take action. Otherwise the kid has learned that his behavior is the way to get things done, because everyone lets him get away with it.
In the meantime I sympathize because I've been there.
-beerman
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: h'
Date: January 10, 2006 09:25PM
BTW the roof was finished a few weeks ago and came out pretty decent.



I suffer from the same sensitivity that you do. A few nuggets of wisdom were shared with me and I'm "trying" to incorporate them into my life. First, remember that nobody can hurt your feelings unless you let them. You can always reject what is being forced on you emotionally.
Second, nothing changes unless you change it. If you don't want the behavior to be repeated then you need to take action. Otherwise the kid has learned that his behavior is the way to get things done, because everyone lets him get away with it.
In the meantime I sympathize because I've been there.
-beerman
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: BigGuynRusty
Date: January 10, 2006 09:40PM
From the Cement.Org website.:
[www.cement.org]

Can it be too hot or too cold to place new concrete?

Temperature extremes make it difficult to properly cure concrete. On hot days, too much water is lost by evaporation from newly placed concrete. If the temperature drops too close to freezing, hydration slows to nearly a standstill. Under these conditions, concrete ceases to gain strength and other desirable properties. In general, the temperature of new concrete should not be allowed to fall below 50 Fahrenheit (10 Celsius) during the curing period.

BGnR
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: Harry in MI
Date: January 10, 2006 09:53PM
A pretty reliable concrete guy was told me that yes, the can order a "hot" mix or something for cold weather pours. In almost the same breath he told me he would never have any of his own worked poured if it wasn't between 50 and 75 degrees.
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: Jimmypoo
Date: January 10, 2006 10:23PM
Why now? Why not a few months ago, or in Spring? (which, I know...could be May up there!)

I think that this is a good general question, but you may have a mix that was heavily modified with polymers that take into account the temp, but -as above, temp and the right slump are always the keys to a nice casting.

What's the guarantee? I suppose I'd be concerned about crystalization and crazing at a micro level, which would cause the thing to break up under load and not have much dimensional stability if it doesn't dry out and THEN freezes.

Admittedly, it's been a decade since I actually had to pay any attention to this, but I did once work a chemist position and the task was for polymer modifiers to enhance properties at a wide temperature variance.

Hell... even that was 8 years ago and just a single position, so I've forgotten what it was I was supposed to know to qualify the candidates.

(are you sure this job wasn't taken just to bury some Chicago regional mob boss i your driveway...for convenience?)
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: bill b
Date: January 10, 2006 10:25PM
Mild weather coupled with (still) warm ground temperatures have worked in your favor.

I'm assuming this is the garage floor. You're OK.

The ground under the concrete is providing warmth and the plastic is helping to hold it in.

I'm at the same latitude as you. If this weather holds out, I may be able to fire up the roto-tiller and finish the fall garden prep. this weekend that I didn't have time for last year. Don't think I'll bother with winter ryegrass, though.
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: January 10, 2006 11:02PM
There are additives that are added to concrete mix depending on the ambient temperatures. The additives prevent freezing of the water in the mixture and allow for the exothermic reaction in the mix to allow it to cure. Concrete harding is a chemical reaction and not a drying process. As long as the batch plant knows what they are doing, there shouldn't be a problem. I've worked on concrete high-rise structures that were poured with ambient temperatures below 30F, but there was also an engineering company taking samples that where sent out for testing after curing.
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: kap
Date: January 10, 2006 11:04PM
Hmm, we were thinking about renovating our garage as well starting with fixing all the cracks on its floor. The daytime temperatures have been good between 70s and low 80s.
May be, we should take advantage this weekend and pour some quik-dry cement.

Kap



SoCal for now.
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: bill b
Date: January 10, 2006 11:16PM
The truck didn't have big letters on the side "hecho en Mexico", did it ?

If it did you may not want to lick the concrete while it's curing.
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: h'
Date: January 11, 2006 12:57AM
Thanks for all the responses.
It's a pretty reputable company. The workers were kind of unmotivated jerks, but I'll reserve judgement until I get a look at what's under the plastic.
I had the guy put some poles in to protect the garage, and he put them in the wrong place-- going to see what recourse I have.



I suffer from the same sensitivity that you do. A few nuggets of wisdom were shared with me and I'm "trying" to incorporate them into my life. First, remember that nobody can hurt your feelings unless you let them. You can always reject what is being forced on you emotionally.
Second, nothing changes unless you change it. If you don't want the behavior to be repeated then you need to take action. Otherwise the kid has learned that his behavior is the way to get things done, because everyone lets him get away with it.
In the meantime I sympathize because I've been there.
-beerman
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: Jimmypoo
Date: January 11, 2006 07:54AM
hecho in Mexico??

Did you know that the three largest companies for concrete are:

LaFarge, Rinker (and a 3rd...whose name just slipped out of my ear) - and they are, in order

French, Aussie and Mexican.

They control virtually ALL of the concrete/cement in the US!

This wasn't true 30 years ago.... but it wasn't a hot biz then. It sure is now.
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Re: Concrete question
Posted by: Racer X
Date: January 11, 2006 11:19AM
and cement prices have shot up to amazing highs lately as all available production gets snapped up and sent overseas to the tsunami-damaged areas. They are willing to pay more than we are.
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