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going to europe
Posted by: pbarra1
Date: July 11, 2016 07:11PM
Family going to Amsterdam for a week and Hamburg, Germany for a week this summer. How many euros do you think I will need per day? Transportation and lodging is already paid. Three adults and two teens. TIA
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: space-time
Date: July 11, 2016 07:21PM
It really depends on what you plan to do. Visit museums? Fancy restaurants or casual eating? Is breakfast included at the hotels you stay?

Anyway, enjoy!!!
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: davester
Date: July 11, 2016 07:23PM
Depends entirely on your style of travelling (i.e. how fancy you eat, how much shopping you want to do, how many museums/concerts/soccer games, red-light-district-venues, etc you intend to go to, whether you take taxis or buses or walk). I suggest that you get a couple of travel guidebooks (digital is best because you don't have to carry books) which will give you an idea of costs for various things. Lonely Planet and Rough Guides are generally good. Some people like Rick Steves. Luckily for you the Euro is pretty weak right now.



"In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion." (1987) -- Carl Sagan



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/11/2016 07:26PM by davester.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: July 11, 2016 07:24PM
I wish I could offer more concrete numbers. I found Germany to be pretty inexpensive overall. Museums were easily the most typically expensive things. Street food was good and cheap.



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Re: going to europe
Posted by: space-time
Date: July 11, 2016 07:24PM
Oh, if you plan to visit the Red Light District, you cannot have too much cash.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: Speedy
Date: July 11, 2016 07:30PM
Not many assuming you have plastic (most Capitalone cards have no foreign transaction fees). Bring hundred dollar bills and exchange them as needed. Figure about $100/day for the group.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: davester
Date: July 11, 2016 07:54PM
Quote
Speedy
Bring hundred dollar bills and exchange them as needed. .

I'm not sure I agree with this. Foreign currency exchange places are usually expensive, whereas ATM fees at regular banks are usually fairly low (not including tourist ATMs which are a ripoff both inside and outside the US. I just use ATMs to dispense cash in chunks as I go. The tricky part is usually the first day, especially if you arrive outside business hours, though there are usually currency exchanges and ATMs in most airports.

I would agree that it's a good idea to check to be sure that your credit cards have no foreign exchange fees. Quite a few of them do, but many don't and will charge you bogus fees. Also be sure to go on your credit card and bank websites and indicate where and when you will be travelling. Otherwise they will immediately block your card if you make a transaction overseas. They might do it anyway, so be prepared to call their international help number when the ATM refuses to give you money.



"In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion." (1987) -- Carl Sagan



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/11/2016 07:56PM by davester.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: Speedy
Date: July 11, 2016 08:03PM
Banks usually tend to have low exchange rates. I have not used ATMs very often because they usually have extra fees tacked on where I have used them.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: Buck
Date: July 11, 2016 08:19PM
It's best to get a few Euros before you leave ($100), and then use your ATM at a bank to withdraw more.

Credit cards work different there in many stores. You'll see signs for "pinpas", which is chip-and-pin. They will insist to enter your PIN when using your credit card. In the USA we don't have that system, so always have cash in case your credit card won't work.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: billb
Date: July 11, 2016 08:46PM
Meals will be the same there as here as long as you venture off the beaten path a little bit in the heavy tourist areas.

I put as much as I can on a CC . I would bring 10 or 20 $100 dollar bills for emergency cash but DO NOT exchange them for Euros. The exchange fees everywhere can be awful especially in the airport. Especially money kiosks that advertise "no fees" for american dollars. The exchange rate is almost always crazy. Buy something, you'll get euros for change back almost always. Almost always at a decent exchange rate with no fees. I try to go to the ATM not-every-day and make sure to get a list of ATM your card will work at/partners with . ( cirrus/novus, etc )
You'll find you need a chip and PIN card ( not the PIN you use at your bank's ATM or counter- you need to use a EURO one and/or a chip and sign, a magnetic swipe card or euroes or dollars. Some places are set up for any of the above, some will only accept one. I don't have a chip and pin and the only place I can remember needing it was buying bus/railway passes but they also took euros - sometimes not at the machine you were trying to buy tickets at that didn't take euros - you might have to look around for another one - or a human being counter.

I would buy a few euros before I went ( if there is time ) especially if you don't want the hassle of trying to find an ATM in the airport that works. Not a lot. Although to tell you the truth for a cab to the hotel they'll take dollars. You really won't need euros right away unless the food on the plane was that bad.


Edit: photocopies of all CC and ATM cards you will be carrying as well as your passports.

and take one of the boat rides thru the canals and get to Anne Frank house before the crowds.
*** new ticket purchase policy at Anne Frank Museum : [www.annefrank.org]

DK has/had a great little travel book for Amsterdam with great maps and histories of many, many of the houses on the streets ( It's NOT the pocket guide ) . It's indispensable for walking around if you get to walk around. It was $25-$30 and worth every penny ( many for other cities are not as great ) .
If I can find mine I'll get the ISBN off of it.

Have fun !! Amsterdam and Copenhagen are great places to poke around. I haven't ben to Germany, yet.



The Phorum Wall keeps us safe from illegal characters and words
The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
BOYCOTT YOPLAIT [www.noyoplait.com]
[soundcloud.com]




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/11/2016 09:04PM by billb.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: max
Date: July 11, 2016 08:56PM
Quote
Buck
You'll see signs for "pinpas", which is chip-and-pin. They will intensist to er your PIN when using your credit card. In the USA we don't have that system, so always have cash in case your credit card won't work.

They may insist that you enter your PIN when you have none, just pressing Enter solves that easily, essentially skipping the requirement...

ATM are generally the best solution, but not always. I found couple Central European cities where one could get a much better deal at the street exchange shops, even better than the FX rate of exchange.
In Budapest the best deal was at the airport, a place you expect to be the worst.
I would think that Amsterdam might have some good deals on the street....
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: Speedy
Date: July 11, 2016 10:02PM
The exchange rate will be better in European airports than in USA airports.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: abevilac
Date: July 11, 2016 11:31PM
Just back from 3 wks in euro zone - I used my Capitol 1 card exclusively. I got 50E at an atm somewhere along the way and I think I still have some change left. It would take a few extra mins for the transaction to go thru and I would use the time to say that I will need to sign a receipt. Everyone was quite used to that with Americans.
Hope you have a great trip.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: billb
Date: July 12, 2016 12:04AM
oh at some restaurants and stores when using your CC they might offer or ask if you want to pay in dollars or euros. It is supposedly often less costly to pay in euros as the currency conversion fee is less ( or in your favor ) that way.



The Phorum Wall keeps us safe from illegal characters and words
The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
BOYCOTT YOPLAIT [www.noyoplait.com]
[soundcloud.com]
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: 3d
Date: July 12, 2016 05:17AM
Quote
Buck
It's best to get a few Euros before you leave ($100), and then use your ATM at a bank to withdraw more.

$100 could be cab fare and a meal. I would up the amount to about $500 before leaving. Try to get most of it in 5, 10, and 20s. You'll get the same universal eye-rolling as you do in the States when you try to pay for a coffee with a 100 ;)
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: billb
Date: July 12, 2016 08:22AM
Quote
3d
Quote
Buck
It's best to get a few Euros before you leave ($100), and then use your ATM at a bank to withdraw more.

$100 could be cab fare and a meal. I would up the amount to about $500 before leaving. Try to get most of it in 5, 10, and 20s. You'll get the same universal eye-rolling as you do in the States when you try to pay for a coffee with a 100 ;)
They have Starbucks in Europe.



The Phorum Wall keeps us safe from illegal characters and words
The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
BOYCOTT YOPLAIT [www.noyoplait.com]
[soundcloud.com]
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: Will Collier
Date: July 12, 2016 02:23PM
Don't buy Euros in the US. If you can even find anywhere to get them, you'll pay a ridiculous fee and exchange rate. Get your starter cash at an ATM in the airport when you arrive. Get "real money" at a bank ATM later. Never use the "Bureau de Change" booths in airports, that's the financial version of buying Monster Cable junk.

Get a Capital One card and use it whenever possible, that'll almost certainly give you the best exchange rate.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/12/2016 02:24PM by Will Collier.
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: billb
Date: July 12, 2016 03:14PM
How much is Capital One's cash advance fee and interest rate when used at an ATM vs your bank's debit card used at a qualified/partner ATM ?


DK travel guide at google link: [books.google.com]



The Phorum Wall keeps us safe from illegal characters and words
The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
BOYCOTT YOPLAIT [www.noyoplait.com]
[soundcloud.com]
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: davester
Date: July 12, 2016 04:37PM
Quote
Will Collier
Don't buy Euros in the US. If you can even find anywhere to get them, you'll pay a ridiculous fee and exchange rate.

Not necessarily. Some banks provide fee-free exchanges for their own customers and the exchange rate is pretty close to the ATM rate. I got a good rate and no fee from my bank (Wells Fargo) on my last trip when I needed a lot of cash in hand to pay an apartment deposit upon our arrival. Just call your own bank and ask them then compare.



"In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion." (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Re: going to europe
Posted by: Will Collier
Date: July 13, 2016 07:11AM
Quote
billb
How much is Capital One's cash advance fee and interest rate when used at an ATM vs your bank's debit card used at a qualified/partner ATM ?


DK travel guide at google link: [books.google.com]

Cash advance from any credit card is almost always a bad idea. Use a regular ATM card linked to a bank account instead.
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