advertisement
Forums

The Forum is sponsored by 
 

AAPL stock: $140.70 ( -0.22 )

*Cached every 60 seconds. For live updating, Click Here

You are currently viewing the Tips and Deals forum
Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: Onamuji
Date: January 11, 2017 06:47AM
[www.nytimes.com]

The rusty-patched bumblebee, once common across the continental United States, has been designated an endangered species by the Fish and Wildlife Service: the country’s first bumblebee, and the first bee from the lower 48 states, to be added to the register. Seven bees were previously listed as endangered, but they are found only in Hawaii.

Since the late 1990s, the population of the rusty-patched bumblebee has declined by nearly 90 percent, a result of a combination of factors, including exposure to pesticides, climate change, habitat loss and disease, federal wildlife officials said. The species, once found in 28 states, the District of Columbia and two Canadian provinces, is found today only in small pockets of its once-sprawling habitat. The designation will accelerate efforts to protect the bees’ habitat and to reduce the use of pesticides that are killing them.

...The service is reviewing three other species of bees to determine whether they ought to be listed as endangered as well: Franklin’s bumblebee, the western bumblebee and the yellow-banded bumblebee.




Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: January 11, 2017 06:49AM
....saw that mentioned end of last year......shame that it has become 'endangered' but seems to represent the downward spiral of the world in general [ particularly with the upcoming political change ]......



____________________________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: m.paris
Date: January 11, 2017 07:36AM
Yet another indication that we may be past the "tipping point" and approaching the "great filter" :-(
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: Drew
Date: January 11, 2017 08:24AM
A quick Google search turns up quite a few articles stating that bees in general are doing fine. A few types may be in danger, but as a whole there is nothing to worry about. I'm not informed, so can't make a conclusion. Just wanted to point it out.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: pdq
Date: January 11, 2017 09:28AM
It's partly my fault.

When our old dog was young, she used to eat bumblebees. She'd come up on an unsuspecting busy bee, quickly mouth it, and immediately spit out the now-slimed-and-temporarily-incapacitated bee on the ground. Then she'd paw it to death, and eat it.

I don't know the details of why she finally gave up this behavior, but one can imagine.

While the story above is true, I don't mean to make light of the situation. I'm not sure if it makes any difference in the big picture, but planting pollinator gardens will certainly make the local bees happy. For whatever reason, the bees around here (MN) just go wild for sedum, which may not make the usual lists of bee-friendly plants. They also seem to like wildflowers.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: January 11, 2017 09:38AM
Reality ?

Think of it as evolution in action. (thanks, Larry Niven)

OK, the human race is one of the larger movers for environmental change in the Anthropocene. And the rest of the planet's lifeforms are evolving to deal with it. Part of the evolutionary process involves extinction of poorly adapted species and expansion of better adapted species in that particular environmental niche.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: Speedy
Date: January 11, 2017 10:24AM
Quote
cbelt3
Reality ?

Think of it as evolution in action. (thanks, Larry Niven)

OK, the human race is one of the larger movers for environmental change in the Anthropocene. And the rest of the planet's lifeforms are evolving to deal with it. Part of the evolutionary process involves extinction of poorly adapted species and expansion of better adapted species in that particular environmental niche.

You mean those who can feed on concrete and are not affected by pesticides?



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: August West
Date: January 11, 2017 10:46AM
Quote

Part of the evolutionary process involves extinction of poorly adapted species and expansion of better adapted species in that particular environmental niche.

I think that's the point of the OP, humans are not proving to be a "better adapted species." Your observations don't comfort me, belty!



Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: January 11, 2017 10:46AM
Quote
Drew
A quick Google search turns up quite a few articles stating that bees in general are doing fine. A few types may be in danger, but as a whole there is nothing to worry about. I'm not informed, so can't make a conclusion. Just wanted to point it out.

Care to point out some of those articles? I'm very curious about the sources. Also: you just made a conclusion. Even if only "a few types" are in danger, that is very bad and alarming news.



Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: January 11, 2017 10:49AM
...that.......xtincts [ stinks ].......



____________________________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: Article Accelerator
Date: January 11, 2017 12:09PM
Quote

…on the way to the end of the world…the downward spiral of the world…approaching the "great filter"…

My, aren't we a cheery bunch!
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: Robert M
Date: January 11, 2017 12:15PM
On,

Correction. One particular species is nearly extinct. Not sure of the status of the other 249 varieties.

Robert
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: freeradical
Date: January 11, 2017 12:36PM
Quote
Robert M
On,

Correction. One particular species is nearly extinct. Not sure of the status of the other 249 varieties.

Robert

Yeah, the title of the thread is kind of dishonest.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: sekker
Date: January 11, 2017 03:29PM
Bees in general are NOT doing well.

There is a LOT of political BS due to the strong likelihood that new pesticides hurt bees.

I honestly would not trust most of the standard internet sites to get the science right.

This designation is just the beginning for bees in general in the US if we do not deal with some important issues like over-use of pesticides and other damage to their natural environment.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: January 11, 2017 03:33PM
....there was a huge epidemic that wiped out a large amount of them......don't think they every figured out what exactly was causing it.......



____________________________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: freeradical
Date: January 11, 2017 03:51PM
Varroa Mites

When I was an amateur beekeeper back in the mid 70's, this threat did not exist in the United States.

I did have to worry about Foulbrood, but there is Terramycin for that.


Check out how many medications there are for bee diseases.


[www.dadant.com]
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: Onamuji
Date: January 11, 2017 06:10PM
Quote
Robert M
On,

Correction. One particular species is nearly extinct. Not sure of the status of the other 249 varieties.

These are the all-time American favorite big fat bumblebees that you and I both probably grew up with. (Disappeared from NY in 2001.)

Used to be one of the -- if not just plain the -- most common bees in the U.S. straight up the coast into Canada and West as far as the Mississippi.

And the population has declined 87% since they started counting.

There are colonies in llinois, Iowa, Maryland, and Ontario.

That's all there are left in the world.

On the Left coast, the Franklin's bumblebee has disappeared entirely. Not a one has been seen for a decade. Fin. It has ceased to be. This is an ex-species. Three more species disappeared from the UK recently.

All bumblebee species are in decline. Yes, a few are likely to remain for awhile. Cherish every big fat bumblebee you see. There's a fair chance that it'll be the last time.







Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/11/2017 06:15PM by Onamuji.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Pause for a moment on the way to the end of the world and consider: The bumblebee is nearly extinct
Posted by: JoeH
Date: January 11, 2017 10:46PM
Yeah, I have seen a lot fewer bumblebees, as well as other bees in the past decade than I recall seeing when I was younger. To encourage them a bit, I don't go for treating my lawn and it grows a mix of grass, clover and other ground covering plants. I do see the occasional bumblebee going for the clover blossoms.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login

Online Users

Guests: 391
Record Number of Users: 52 on November 20, 2014
Record Number of Guests: 847 on February 04, 2015