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RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: July 16, 2017 09:14PM
......due to complications......will always remember 'Mission: Impossible'....'Space: 1999'.......and in Hitchcock's 'North by Northwest'......


....and George A. Romero.....77.....due to lung cancer....



Martin Landau Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘Ed Wood’ Actor Was 89

.....Academy Award winning actor of Ed Wood, Martin Landau has died at the age of 89. Also known for his versatile roles in classic films like Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest and for his role in the Mission: Impossible television series as master of disguise Rollin Hand , the actor died Saturday of “unexpected complications.”

Landau’s death, which was confirmed by his publicist Dick Guttman, occurred after a brief stay at the UCLA Medical Center. He was born in Brooklyn, NY on June 20, 1928 and went on to study at the Pratt Institute. The year he auditioned for the Actors Studio, he and Steve McQueen were accepted out of 2000 applicants. This was the start of his successful acting career.

His career in television, film, and stage spanned over five decades. “Martin Landau is living proof that Hollywood will find great roles for great actors at any stage of their careers,” said Guttman in a release.

He made his big screen debut the Gregory Peck war film Pork Chop Hill in 1959, but his first major film appearance was North by Northwest, a role he nabbed when Hitchcock after saw his stage performance with Edward G. Robinson in Paddy Chayefsky’s Middle of the Night. In addition to the classic film and TV’s Mission: Impossible, he starred opposite Jeff Bridges in Francis Ford Coppola’s Tucker: The Man His Dream in 1988, where he received his first Oscar nomination. The following year he earned his second Oscar nod for his role as Judah Rosenthal in Woody Allen’s Crimes and Misdemeanors. In 1994, when he received a third nom and won for Best Supporting Actor in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood where he played Bela Lugosi.

His performance in Ed Wood also earned him a Golden Globe Award the Screen Actor Guild’s first annual award, The American Comedy Award, The New York Film Critics Award, The National Society of Film Critics Award, The Chicago Film Critics Award, The Los Angeles Film Critics Award, and every other award for Best Supporting Actor in 1994. He collaborated with Burton again as a voice actor for his animated features 9 and Frankenweenie.

More recently, he starred opposite with Paul Sorvino in the dramedy The Last Poker Game, which bowed earlier this year at Tribeca Film Festival. Deadline had the honor of interviewing him for the film which centered on the challenges and complexities of old age but emphasizing that life must be lived fully at any age. He also starred with legendary actor Christopher Plummer in the 2015 indie Holocaust drama Remember from director Atom Egoyan. He also starred in The Red Maple Leaf with Kris Kirstofferson and James Caan as well as the critically acclaimed Lovely with Ellen Burstyn.

Before his death, Landau was the Artistic Director of the Actors Studio alongside director Mark Rydell. He was a very active member of the Studio for over sixty years. After encouragement my Lee Strasberg, he became a sought-after acting teacher training actors such as Jack Nicholson and Angelica Houston.

Landau’s versatile talents shined on TV as he made appearances on the small screen after his memorable role on Mission: Impossible. He nabbed six Emmy nominations including two for guest starring appearances on Without A Trace as well as the HBO comedy Entourage.

As a writer, Landau was working on a yet-untitled memoir which detailed his accomplishments in theatre, film and television. He also wrote the foreword of Life Magazine’s book on his friend and fellow Hollywood icon James Dean. In addition a documentary entitled An Actor’s Actor: The Life of Martin Landau was in development.

He is survived by his daughters Susie Landau Finch and Juliet Landau, his sons-in-law Roy Finch and Deverill Weekes, former wife and co-star Barbara Bain, godson Dylan Becker, friend Gretchen Becker, sister Elinor Schwartz and his 8-year-old granddaughter Aria Isabel Landau Finch.




another one passes away........?!



George A. Romero Dies: ‘Night Of The Living Dead’ Director Was 77

....George A. Romero, the director who all but invented the modern zombie genre with his 1968 horror classic Night of the Living Dead, has died at 77 of lung cancer.

nfused with social commentary and a realistic, midnight-movie terror, Romero’s brazenly stark thriller, and the sequels that followed, made as large an impact on the genre and a culture’s nightmares as any horror film since the Universal Studios monster chillers of the 1930s.

His death was confirmed by his manager Chris Roe, who released the following statement on behalf of the family:

“Legendary filmmaker George A. Romero passed away on Sunday July 16, listening to the score of ‘The Quiet Man,’ one of his all-time favorite films, with his wife, Suzanne Desrocher Romero, and daughter, Tina Romero at his side. He died peacefully in his sleep, following a brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer, and leaves behind a loving family, many friends, and a filmmaking legacy that has endured, and will continue to endure, the test of time.”

The Pittsburgh native’s low-budget, black and white film went from cult favorite to blockbuster franchise with Romero’s 1978 sequel Dawn of the Dead, 1985’s Day of the Dead (1985), Land of the Dead (2005), Diary of the Dead (2007) and finally 2009’s Survival of the Dead. His take on the vampire genre, Martin, was released in 1978, and he wrote the 1990 Night remake, directed by Tom Savini.

As a producer, Romero delivered TV’s seminal 1980s horror anthology Tales From the Dark Side.

“Hard to quantify how much he inspired me & what he did for cinema,” tweeted Hostel director Eli Roth. (See other Hollywood reactions here.)

After graduating from Carnegie Mellon University in 1960, Romero started a small commercial production company before undertaking his 1968 $114,000 midnight movie groundbreaker, a film that not only set zombie genre rules that survive today with The Walking Dead, but also was hailed for its casting of African-American actor Duane Jones in a heroic role.

Other Romero directing credits include Creepshow (1982), Monkey Shines (1988), The Dark Half (1993), and Bruiser (2000).

But it was Night of the Living Dead that changed the horror game, with its slow-moving, gut-chomping zombies terrorizing a disparate group of survivors gathered in a remote Pennsylvania farmhouse. Surprise deaths, racial undertones, anti-establishment fervor and a stylish, gory-for-the-time relentlessness revolutionized the B-movie genre, taking it from drive-in theaters to shopping mall cineplexes – the very places he satirized with savage glee in 1978’s Dawn of the Dead.

Today’s zombies might be faster and grislier, brought to life with special effects that would have been unimaginable in 1968, but The Walking Dead, Get Out and 28 Days Later, to name just a very few, would be unthinkable without Romero’s dark vision of life after death.



from lung cancer.......?!



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Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 07/16/2017 09:21PM by NewtonMP2100.
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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89........
Posted by: Bernie
Date: July 16, 2017 09:20PM





Staunton, Virginia
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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: July 16, 2017 10:34PM
Two greats lost.

Landau's turn as Bela Lugosi was astonishing; a very well-deserved Oscar role.



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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: ka jowct
Date: July 16, 2017 11:21PM
I loved Martin Landau playing Lugosi in "Ed Wood" ("Boris Karloff is a cork stacker!" is a forum-friendly version of one of his lines.) He was also terrific as a washed up, desperate producer, amongst a very good cast, in "Mistress". If you've never seen it, check it out.
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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: Ombligo
Date: July 17, 2017 05:36AM
Landau was a wonderful understated performer.
Romero created a whole genre of films and television.

I have a medical procedure scheduled this week that will keep me immobile for a day, I think I will add Ed Wood and Night of the Living Dead to my watch list. Perhaps Tucker - A Man and his Dream, and even Space-1999 too.



“No persons are more frequently wrong, than those who will not admit they are wrong.”
-- François de La Rochefoucauld
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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: July 17, 2017 10:39AM
Only Landau movie on Netflix right now is Rounders, which I've never seen. Looks good. Great cast.



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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: decay
Date: July 17, 2017 11:32AM
I plan to watch Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) which was highly recommended to me.

[www.imdb.com]

Landau was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actor in a Supporting Role



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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: ka jowct
Date: July 17, 2017 11:36AM
I liked Crimes and Misdemeanors; I should watch it again. I saw it years ago.

iTunes has "Mistress" available.
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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: ztirffritz
Date: July 17, 2017 11:55AM
Pittsburgh lost a legend with Romero.



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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: Rick-o
Date: July 17, 2017 12:33PM
Dang! Two bits of bad news!

R.I.P. to both celebrities. You have entertained me with your work for many years.

(I was confused when I first read this. I was thinking of Ceasar Romero, whom I though had already passed)



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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: AllGold
Date: July 17, 2017 05:50PM
A bit of trivia about Martin Landau. He was offered the role of Spock on the original Star Trek series but said he turned it down because (paraphrasing) he wanted to act not play an emotionless character.



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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: July 17, 2017 11:46PM
Quote
AllGold
A bit of trivia about Martin Landau. He was offered the role of Spock on the original Star Trek series but said he turned it down because (paraphrasing) he wanted to act not play an emotionless character.

I read that. And it was always funny watching Nimoy try to play a character with emotion. He was as perfectly cast as a 2 x 4 in a wall.



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Re: RIP: Martin Landau....89.......and George Romero....77....
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: July 18, 2017 11:14AM
.....he and his wife, Barbara Bain, divorced in 1993.......their daughter, Juliet Landau, was Drusilla on 'Buffy'......



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