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Getting electric water heater with aluminum anode rod. Should I replace with magnesium from the get-go?
Posted by: Dennis S
Date: September 08, 2017 12:22AM
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Re: Getting electric water heater with aluminum anode rod. Should I replace with magnesium from the get-go?
Posted by: freeradical
Date: September 08, 2017 12:38AM
Isn't Mg just a little bit too high on the activity series?

Mg reacts with hot water. The products are hydrogen gas and Magnesium Hydroxide.

Mg(s) + 2H2O(l)>Mg(OH)2(s)+H2(g)

Do you want this to happen?
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Re: Getting electric water heater with aluminum anode rod. Should I replace with magnesium from the get-go?
Posted by: Racer X
Date: September 08, 2017 01:06AM
Usually zinc is used.
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Re: Getting electric water heater with aluminum anode rod. Should I replace with magnesium from the get-go?
Posted by: Dennis S
Date: September 08, 2017 01:51AM
From what I can tell magnesium is a common alternative:

[www.google.com]

I guess the question is: is aluminum a big no-no?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/08/2017 01:52AM by Dennis S.
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Re: Getting electric water heater with aluminum anode rod. Should I replace with magnesium from the get-go?
Posted by: Speedy
Date: September 08, 2017 04:56AM
I believe the difference between a six year warranty water heater and a 12 year warranty is that one has one anode and the other has two anodes. Check to see if there is a fitting that takes a second anode. Go electric powered anode and never have your water heater rust and leak:

[www.waterheaterrescue.com]



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/08/2017 04:59AM by Speedy.
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Re: Getting electric water heater with aluminum anode rod. Should I replace with magnesium from the get-go?
Posted by: billb
Date: September 08, 2017 05:24AM
Quote
Dennis S
From what I can tell magnesium is a common alternative:

[www.google.com]

I guess the question is: is aluminum a big no-no?
not really, there's three options, magnesium ( the most common ) and then aluminum and an aluminum/zinc alloy. Magnesium alloy can sometimes present a problem with iron/sulfur rich water and iron bacteria. The aluminum or aluminum/zinc is often substituted when you have rotten egg smelling hot water. Although
keeping the stored water above the 100-115ºF threshold (usually 135 to 140ºF) to prevent Legionnaire's also helps prevent the iron bacteria from colonizing .
Aluminum/Al-zinc might also be preferred in areas where soft water treatment is common, I'd have to look that up.
My tank has two anodes and I almost switched them to Al-zinc , but draining the tank to check them and replacing the bottom one as it was about 1/2 to 2/3 gone seems to have flushed the tank out sufficiently well that the iron bacteria problem seems to have gone away. Didn't see any sediment in the bottom of the tank.

Pretty sure magnesium alloy costs more and I wouldn't go swapping the anodes out perchance there's a reason beyond cost for your tank to be supplied with al or al-zinc instead of magnesium. Theoretically the aluminum or al-zinc (probably labelled ZA) should last a little longer.



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Re: Getting electric water heater with aluminum anode rod. Should I replace with magnesium from the get-go?
Posted by: JoeH
Date: September 08, 2017 11:41AM
Water heaters in this area are usually supplied with aluminum or aluminum/zinc anodes, most water supplies are high in iron content leached from the rocks. So unless you know ahead of time that your water is compatible with Mg anodes, I would not recommend switching. But if you are getting a new water heater installed, you can install a second anode, it is easier doing that before the heater is in place.
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