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New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Wags
Date: January 11, 2018 09:11PM
This is new to me. Very cool.



More:

[www.nationalgeographic.com]



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/12/2018 11:05AM by Wags.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Wags
Date: January 11, 2018 09:15PM
Sorry for the size of the pix, too much trouble to figure it out. Look at the article for better scale.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Winston
Date: January 11, 2018 09:25PM
That's pretty cool.



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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Acer
Date: January 11, 2018 09:44PM
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: jdc
Date: January 11, 2018 09:55PM
To make an image a specifc size add this (but no spaces between brakets): [ img size=300 ]

You can go back and edit if you want... maybe 600?



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Edited 999 time(s). Last edit at 12:08PM by jdc.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Winston
Date: January 11, 2018 10:10PM
Does that replace the standard [ img ] lead for an image URL?



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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: jdc
Date: January 11, 2018 11:36PM
Quote
Winston
Does that replace the standard [ img ] lead for an image URL?

Yeah, quote Acers post and you will see the whole code



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Edited 999 time(s). Last edit at 12:08PM by jdc.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: steve...
Date: January 11, 2018 11:50PM
Quote
jdc
Quote
Winston
Does that replace the standard [ img ] lead for an image URL?

Yeah, quote Acers post and you will see the whole code

Thanks, good to know. thumbs up




Northern California Coast
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Winston
Date: January 11, 2018 11:57PM
Likewise. I've avoided linking to large photos in the past - this will save some trouble!



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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: space-time
Date: January 12, 2018 05:36AM
Beautiful. Pure Math.

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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Lizabeth
Date: January 12, 2018 07:49AM
There's a quilt in this...
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Winston
Date: January 12, 2018 08:36AM
Quote
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/01/photo-journal-birds-paths-migration-starling/
If birds left tracks in the sky, what would they look like? For years Barcelona-based photographer Xavi Bou has been fascinated by this question.
. . .
Ultimately he chose to work with a video camera, from which he extracts high-resolution photographs. After he films the birds in motion, Bou selects a section of the footage and layers the individual frames into one image. He finds the process similar to developing film: He can’t tell in advance what the final result will be. There’s one magical second, he says, when the image—chimerical and surreal—begins to emerge.

Before Bou began this project, which he calls “Ornitografías, . . .





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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/12/2018 08:36AM by Winston.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: GuyGene
Date: January 12, 2018 09:02AM
Looks good to me, Wags. I have books about early American wildlife and they say bird migration would block the sun for hours as they flew across. If I could wish for a fantasy dream, it would be to go back to see America about 700-1,000 years ago. Wow!!



That old man - he don't think like no old man...
Now I wouldn't want to be within 400 - 500 yards of one of them nuclear bombs when it goes off! WW1 Vet Old Man
"He's pinned under an outcropping of rock. Lucky for him, the rock kept the dirt from burying him alive."
If idiots could fly, this place would be an airport. And I'd be a TSA agent.
A bonified member of The Mystic Knights of The Sea, George P. Stevens, President. Andy Brown, Treasurer, Algonquin J. Calhoun, Legal Consultant.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: DP
Date: January 12, 2018 10:01AM
That's a lot of work! It reminds of the old days when we spent hours in the darkroom doing composite photographs, like Ryszard Horowitz, e.g., before Photoshop. That's a lot of work picking out individual images and piecing them together. Nice results, tho!




Disclaimer: This post is checked for correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Any attempts at humor are solely the responsibility of the author and bear no claim that any and all readers will approve or appreciate said attempt at humor.
My name is DP, and I approve this message.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Pam
Date: January 12, 2018 10:21AM
Wow!
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: mikebw
Date: January 12, 2018 10:25AM
Quote
space-time
Beautiful. Pure Math.


Circularly polarized sine wave!
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Wags
Date: January 12, 2018 10:58AM
Quote
GuyGene
Looks good to me, Wags. I have books about early American wildlife and they say bird migration would block the sun for hours as they flew across. If I could wish for a fantasy dream, it would be to go back to see America about 700-1,000 years ago. Wow!!

Me, too. On a smaller but still amazing scale I remember when I first moved to Portland, Ore in the early 70's. In fall or spring you would be inside and start to hear a loud cacophony of honking. Outside the sky would literally be filled from horizon to horizon with Canada geese, making an unbelievable amount of noise, midway in their migration. It'd take an hour or so for them to fly by. I'd say now it's down to about 5% of what it was then.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Winston
Date: January 12, 2018 11:54AM
Quote
GuyGene
Looks good to me, Wags. I have books about early American wildlife and they say bird migration would block the sun for hours as they flew across. If I could wish for a fantasy dream, it would be to go back to see America about 700-1,000 years ago. Wow!!

Passenger Pigeons.

Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passenger_pigeon
The pigeon migrated in enormous flocks, constantly searching for food, shelter, and breeding grounds, and was once the most abundant bird in North America, numbering around 3 to 5 billion at the height of its population.



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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: January 12, 2018 12:17PM
Quote
space-time
Beautiful. Pure Math.


A friend sent me this link the other day..the one Space posted is one of my favs..I like the minimal ones..Very cool stuff. I'd love to a nice print of one of these.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: GuyGene
Date: January 12, 2018 08:20PM
Yeah Winston, passenger pigeons, but also many other kinds of birds just filled the skies back then. Trees were so big they dwarfed people. Hardly any (I'd like to say, zero) non native species of plant nor animal. Buffalo. Oh me, just to have seen all the buffalo (I know, it's bison, but...). All kinds of things I'd like to have seen. I have some very old books published back in mid 1800s, and even the language they used back then was so different. Words that people today don't even know. Words that represent objects and methods no longer around, and in one of those books, it talks about how Chesapeake Bay was full of oysters that were a foot long. From natural, clean water that was so full of fish, even the water would turn dark.



That old man - he don't think like no old man...
Now I wouldn't want to be within 400 - 500 yards of one of them nuclear bombs when it goes off! WW1 Vet Old Man
"He's pinned under an outcropping of rock. Lucky for him, the rock kept the dirt from burying him alive."
If idiots could fly, this place would be an airport. And I'd be a TSA agent.
A bonified member of The Mystic Knights of The Sea, George P. Stevens, President. Andy Brown, Treasurer, Algonquin J. Calhoun, Legal Consultant.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Winston
Date: January 12, 2018 11:31PM
Quote
GuyGene
Yeah Winston, passenger pigeons, but also many other kinds of birds just filled the skies back then. Trees were so big they dwarfed people. Hardly any (I'd like to say, zero) non native species of plant nor animal. Buffalo. Oh me, just to have seen all the buffalo (I know, it's bison, but...). All kinds of things I'd like to have seen. I have some very old books published back in mid 1800s, and even the language they used back then was so different. Words that people today don't even know. Words that represent objects and methods no longer around, and in one of those books, it talks about how Chesapeake Bay was full of oysters that were a foot long. From natural, clean water that was so full of fish, even the water would turn dark.


Not sure what era the sources you were looking at focussed on, but I'd not be surprised if some of them are full of myths.

For example, the Wikipedia article on passenger pigeons says there is speculation that their population was much, much smaller in pre-Columbian times. Diseases killing off Native Americans and changes in agricultural practices brought by European settlers created a lot more food, and, initially, less hunting of the passenger pigeons. (Their extermination came with wholesale slaughter for commercial processing, after railroads and canneries were created.)

Another falacy: That the continental U.S. was full of untouched primeval forests. In New England, the Native Americans practiced intensive farming, and there were very few trees pre-Columbus. In many other areas slash and burn agriculture was used, which also tended to keep the tree population down. Settlers arriving in the 1600s or 1700s (or later) found 100-300 year old trees in places where the native population had died out. Note that estimates are that the Native American population was 10% or less of what it had been pre-Columbus when the Pilgrims landed. They found a perfect site for a village because the natives had abandoned it.

Possibly the largest society in the Americas, and certainly the largest in North America, was the Mississippian culture.
[en.wikipedia.org]
It was completely gone by the time Europeans arrived in the center of the U.S. Because they didn't build with stone, very little is left of their civilization, but it was apparently quite sophisticated, with a widespread trading network in the Mississippi valley and along its tributaries.



That's not to say that modern society hasn't had a huge impact on the environment. But the idea that America was untouched before Europeans arrived just isn't so.


- W



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Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 01/12/2018 11:43PM by Winston.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: Winston
Date: January 12, 2018 11:36PM
And about those giant trees: a lot of them were chestnuts, which were killed off quite rapidly after the chestnut blight was accidentally introduced in 1904.
[en.wikipedia.org]
Quote

Within 40 years the nearly four-billion-strong American chestnut population in North America was devastated [15] — only a few clumps of trees remained in California, Michigan, Wisconsin and the Pacific Northwest.
. . .
It is estimated that in some places, such as the Appalachian Mountains, one in every four hardwoods was an American chestnut. Mature trees often grew straight and branch-free for 50 feet and could grow up to 100 feet tall with a trunk diameter of 14 feet at a few feet above ground level. For three centuries many barns and homes near the Appalachian Mountains were made from American chestnut.


100 feet tall with a trunk diameter of 14 feet at a few feet above ground level
Giant trees indeed.



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Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/12/2018 11:38PM by Winston.
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Re: New bird photography technique - sky tracks
Posted by: billb
Date: January 13, 2018 06:06PM
A little bit longer than 40 year.
I grew up with roasting chestnuts in the oven and the fireplace as well as popcorn in a fireplace.
The chestnut tree in the back yard finally fell down in the mid-60ies.
But I remember knocking chestnuts out of the tree with rocks and sticks in the late fifties and early 60ies.
Taking rocks and hammers to get the brown chestnuts out of the green covers.



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