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What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: February 12, 2018 01:57PM
So I'm reading the article "Jambusters" in the current edition of The New Yorker magazine. It's a piece on how Xerox engineers confront and sometimes solve paper jam in their machines.



Notice anything?
PS-if you look it up on line it reads differently. That's why I scanned the print edition page.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: February 12, 2018 02:08PM
The description of the shape of an airplane wing is backwards.



It is what it is.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: pdq
Date: February 12, 2018 02:13PM
You guys are both sharper-eyed than me.

But you're right. That's an oopsie.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: February 12, 2018 02:23PM
The New Yorker is famous for its rigorous fact-checking.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: February 12, 2018 03:01PM
I would guess the New Yorker doesn't have a lot of engineers in their fact checking department.



In tha 360. MRF User Map
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: ka jowct
Date: February 12, 2018 04:50PM
I've been seeing some obvious errors from publications that really should be able to do better: for example, to know the difference between "lie" and "lay" and to be able to conjugate them correctly.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: February 12, 2018 04:55PM
Quote
Filliam H. Muffman
I would guess the New Yorker doesn't have a lot of engineers in their fact checking department.

Perhaps not (and I am an engineer, which does explain why I grokked this right away), but a ten second Google search would have set things straight.



It is what it is.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: February 12, 2018 06:55PM
Quote
Filliam H. Muffman
I would guess the New Yorker doesn't have a lot of engineers in their fact checking department.

You don't need to be an engineer to know the correct shape of an airplane's wing.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: space-time
Date: February 12, 2018 07:19PM
speaking about the shape of an airplane wing: there is a famous Physics problem that ask students to calculate how fast should a turtle move in order to be airborne. That's all that is given, nothing more.

You need to make some reasonable assumptions about shape, size and weight of the animal and then you come up with the correct answer. Incidentally, I forgot what the speed was, and I don't think I can solve it again (I forgot a lot of that stuff).
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: MGS_forgot_password
Date: February 12, 2018 08:42PM
To be fair, they may only be reporting how Ruiz and Thompson described airplane wings.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: blooz
Date: February 12, 2018 09:32PM
I know little about engineering, so i tend to believe "experts." But i did wonder about the "top of an airplane wing is flat" business since i just flew day before yesterday and was looking at the wings. Didn't look flat to me.



And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once.
—Friedrich Nietzsche
Western Massachusetts
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: Acer
Date: February 12, 2018 09:40PM
I'm trying to get upset about this, but it's just not flying for me.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: space-time
Date: February 12, 2018 09:54PM
Quote
Acer
I'm trying to get upset about this, but it's just not flying for me.

LOL
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: February 12, 2018 10:39PM
All I could think of was an old external storage solution....
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: February 12, 2018 11:15PM
Quote
space-time
speaking about the shape of an airplane wing: there is a famous Physics problem that ask students to calculate how fast should a turtle move in order to be airborne. That's all that is given, nothing more.

You need to make some reasonable assumptions about shape, size and weight of the animal and then you come up with the correct answer. Incidentally, I forgot what the speed was, and I don't think I can solve it again (I forgot a lot of that stuff).

Based on the old Gamera movies I watched as a kid... 40 MPH?



It is what it is.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: February 12, 2018 11:27PM
Quote
blooz
I know little about engineering, so i tend to believe "experts." But i did wonder about the "top of an airplane wing is flat" business since i just flew day before yesterday and was looking at the wings. Didn't look flat to me.

For the most part (there are always exceptions) always believe what you see with your own eyes.



It is what it is.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/12/2018 11:28PM by N-OS X-tasy!.
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Re: What is the matter with this excerpt from The New Yorker?
Posted by: Racer X
Date: February 13, 2018 01:17AM
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Quote
space-time
speaking about the shape of an airplane wing: there is a famous Physics problem that ask students to calculate how fast should a turtle move in order to be airborne. That's all that is given, nothing more.

You need to make some reasonable assumptions about shape, size and weight of the animal and then you come up with the correct answer. Incidentally, I forgot what the speed was, and I don't think I can solve it again (I forgot a lot of that stuff).

Based on the old Gamera movies I watched as a kid... 40 MPH?

goodone
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