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We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 12, 2018 05:44PM
[www.redfin.com]

I am so tempted to buy this houses but I don't know if i have the energy to keep up with repairs on such an old house. We saw the house yesterday and it looks even better than in these pictures.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Rick-o
Date: March 12, 2018 05:49PM
Nice! thumbs up

It looks like a major renovation has already taken place. It should be no more difficult than maintaining any other house. What did the mechanical systems look like, everything modernized?

Nearly 4000sf? Going to take a lot to keep it heated, I would think.



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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 12, 2018 05:52PM
regarding utilities, I got this from the agent. Take it with a grain of salt. I guess I could ask to see the bills if I decided to buy the house.

Also, the seller had sent me the below with regards to the utilities:

*Electric bill ranges from $150/mo in the winter to $400/mo in summer (pool pump running every day for 8-10 hrs and keeping the house at a really comfortable temp). Avg for the whole year is $260/mo.



*Propane (clothes dryer and stove top) is on automatic delivery and they seem to come 3 times a year and every time it's been around $60-80 I think. Heating oil is the biggest bill in (usually only for Jan and Feb and maybe the beginning of Mar). Being from Florida we like to keep the house warm. I would say during Jan and Feb expect to pay around $700/mo for oil. You can also substantially decrease this cost if you like to burn wood in the stoves. The heat is great and two years ago I didn't use any oil until the last half of Feb, only because I ran out of seasoned wood. Burning wood you will go through a chord plus a month. A chord of wood costs anywhere from $200-250.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: archipirata
Date: March 12, 2018 05:58PM
The $14,000 a year in property taxes alone is more than my mortgage on a similar sized house here in the middle of nowhere. Guess I'm glad I live where I do.



Athens, OH
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: deckeda
Date: March 12, 2018 05:58PM
Picture #24: Does it come with the vineyard? Nevermind

Yeah, looks like the modernizing was done long ago. That’s not a “hint” that it’s become “old” again; we have no way of knowing that. You could EASILY buy a “typical” 15-20 yr old house and have more problems.

But don’t listen to me, unless you also picked the CX-5. smiling smiley
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: mikebw
Date: March 12, 2018 06:00PM
Lotsa house lotsa work, even just keeping it clean. Looks very nice though!
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Forrest
Date: March 12, 2018 06:00PM
Sold 2011
Sold 2015
On the market again in 2018
What's wrong with this house?

The property taxes are $14,187 per year!
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: pdq
Date: March 12, 2018 06:01PM
Around here it's a "cord" of wood.

That's a very pretty house, though. Very classic.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: btfc
Date: March 12, 2018 06:02PM
A chord of wood:



smiling smiley
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: deckeda
Date: March 12, 2018 06:13PM
Difficult to put some of this in perspective as most everything about that house is out of my affordability.

For example, why would saving money by burning wood matter to someone who could afford $700 JUST for heating oil? My thoughts regarding that, are that wood consumption requires significant user participation but that the financial rewards are substantial. Certainly when compared to the heating oil. I’m talking about being tasked with lighting/relighting a stove(s) or something in the basement each day/night.

Forget those fireplaces; they will heat nearby rooms (maybe) and slurp heat away from far rooms. But if you heat the basement the whole house is warm, evenly.

We had that sort of heat last year when our inlaws lived in the basement. They tended the fire! Heat was awesome. Warm floors are the best. And then they basically moved and we knew we’d never tend the fire —-even though we’re both home all day. Heat from the heat pump and living room gas fireplace are a withering pathetic joke.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: C(-)ris
Date: March 12, 2018 06:26PM
If I could afford that house and $14k in property taxes a year, $700 for heating oil wouldn't phase me...but since I can't... eye popping smiley A house that size here in WI is about $250k.



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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: March 12, 2018 06:28PM
.....fa' ged....'bout it......way too much......



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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: March 12, 2018 06:32PM
You really need a spreadsheet to work out the total energy bill. It reminds me a little of... rgG's(?) old place.

...and tough to find the tax records. I had to search and double back a couple of times. It's actually listed in Plainsboro tax records, not Cranbury. ~$17,125 per year assuming the listing price is close to the new sale price. Water coming from a well implies they somehow fit in the septic field around the well, house, garage, trees, pool, and driveway... dunno smiley



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Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 03/12/2018 06:36PM by Filliam H. Muffman.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: billb
Date: March 12, 2018 07:05PM
Quote
deckeda
Difficult to put some of this in perspective as most everything about that house is out of my affordability.

For example, why would saving money by burning wood matter to someone who could afford $700 JUST for heating oil? My thoughts regarding that, are that wood consumption requires significant user participation but that the financial rewards are substantial. Certainly when compared to the heating oil. I’m talking about being tasked with lighting/relighting a stove(s) or something in the basement each day/night.

Forget those fireplaces; they will heat nearby rooms (maybe) and slurp heat away from far rooms. But if you heat the basement the whole house is warm, evenly.

We had that sort of heat last year when our inlaws lived in the basement. They tended the fire! Heat was awesome. Warm floors are the best. And then they basically moved and we knew we’d never tend the fire —-even though we’re both home all day. Heat from the heat pump and living room gas fireplace are a withering pathetic joke.


The "fireplaces" have EPA approved wood stoves installed in them. Likely burn 24/7 once it gets cold. Relights every three or four weeks for ash removal. The ashes are fertilizer. Garden or lawn. Likely reloads 2 or 3 times a day depending on outside temps . Probably 4 to 8 cords a year, with a cord BTU equivalent of 100 to 150 gallons of oil per cord depending on wood species.



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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/12/2018 07:06PM by billb.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: rgG
Date: March 12, 2018 07:35PM
If you are young enough and good at DIY and don’t mind the maintenance of an older house, maybe go for it.
I would get a damn good inspection first though. Personally, I was always scared of a place that old. My MIL had a house of about that vintage. She had it updated after they moved in, but it was due for another one when she sold it. Unless all the systems and even the interior finishes, like does it have lead paint on the trim or asbestos anywhere, then you could be looking at a lot of work at some point. The other thing about old houses, the word “custom” becomes part of your standard vocabulary as nothing is a standard fit for stuff made today.

MIL once asked if we would want to live in her house when she was gone, I said definitely not, actually I think I said Helll No, but some people really like an old house with all its quirks. I am not up for that much work. Our old house was a new build when we bought it and it was way more upkeep and maintenance than I thought it would be.





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: parsaplenty
Date: March 12, 2018 07:44PM
Believe it or not for that house in a town like Cranbury, its fairly reasonable. Would probably be 100K-200K more if it was closer to main street and on a side street. Property taxes are a big issue in NJ. If I don't complain about them at least once a week something is definitely wrong! I live about 15 mins away in a neighboring town in a home less than half the size, on a lot thats about 6K square feet and my tax bill is 9K!
I'd be wary of the pool. Concrete pools are expensive to refinish. I speak of experience.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: jdc
Date: March 12, 2018 07:49PM
Looks move in ready to me. I wouldnt be a fan of the road out front, looks busy, same with intersection.



----


Edited 999 time(s). Last edit at 12:08PM by jdc.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: March 12, 2018 07:57PM
Ummm...

[www.youtube.com]



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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: chopper
Date: March 12, 2018 08:27PM
Man I was just bitching about my property taxes being $2400 a year.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Speedy
Date: March 12, 2018 09:14PM
$769,900? Can I come live there? I'll feed the wood stoves.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 12, 2018 09:23PM
Quote
Speedy
$769,900? Can I come live there? I'll feed the wood stoves.

LOL... yeas, prices are ridiculous in this area. A few miles down the road houses are 500s. But school district is not as good they say.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: mattkime
Date: March 12, 2018 09:30PM
I know someone who just bought a 4 year old apartment and it needs a new roof. was more expensive than that house as well.

just because a place is old doesn't mean it needs a lot of work. just because a place is new doesn't mean it doesn't have a ton of broken @#$%&.



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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Yoyodyne ArtWorks
Date: March 12, 2018 10:43PM
Quote
Forrest
Sold 2011
Sold 2015
On the market again in 2018
What's wrong with this house?

The property taxes are $14,187 per year!

Bingo, we have a winner! That many short-term owners is a HUGE red flag!



Once we place nonhuman animals outside our sphere of moral consideration
and treat them as things we use to satisfy our own desires,
the outcome is predictable.
- Peter Singer
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: March 13, 2018 12:19AM
I live in a slightly older house than that, and I think the lumber used to construct houses of this era is better than what is used today, provided termites have not deemed it delicious (or that it's not a balloon frame). My house does not creak and has not settled on the field stone and brick foundation. The oil heat was replaced with gas, and the house was originally heated by coal. Insulating can be an issue, and make sure there is no knob and tube still in use.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Speedy
Date: March 13, 2018 03:36AM
Quote
mrbigstuff
I live in a slightly older house than that, and I think the lumber used to construct houses of this era is better than what is used today, provided termites have not deemed it delicious (or that it's not a balloon frame). My house does not creak and has not settled on the field stone and brick foundation. The oil heat was replaced with gas, and the house was originally heated by coal. Insulating can be an issue, and make sure there is no knob and tube still in use.

Good point and perhaps the reason the house has turned over often:

"As existing K&T wiring gets older, insurance companies may deny coverage due to a perception of increased risk.[6] Several companies will not write new homeowners policies at all unless all K&T wiring is replaced, or an electrician certifies that the wiring is in good condition. Also, many institutional lenders are unwilling to finance a home with the relatively low-capacity service typical of K&T wiring, unless the electrical service is upgraded.[4][7][12] Partial upgrades, where low demand lighting circuits are left intact, may be acceptable to some insurers."



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Ombligo
Date: March 13, 2018 05:53AM
I'll bet one of two earlier buyers was a flipper who took longer than expected, most likely the 2011 buyer. Check out the selling prices on those sales to know for sure.



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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: tenders
Date: March 13, 2018 06:19AM
Nothing obviously wrong with that house if you like the location. That would be double the price and triple the property taxes in my neighborhood, and the reason the taxes can be that high is because it's cheaper to use a good public school system than it is to send kids to private school. The real estate market is extremely efficient that way.

People move in and out of houses all the time for investment, family, and work reasons. Unless it's haunted I wouldn't think much of it, unless it were very VERY haunted, in which case you negotiate down the price to the point that you don't mind any more.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Michael
Date: March 13, 2018 07:03AM
Pretty cool house. It looks to me like there's water stains on the ceiling above the wood stove in pics 3 and 4. It might be shadows but since the pictures are from opposite perspectives I'd wonder about it.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: 3d
Date: March 13, 2018 07:58AM
It needs more windows.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Fritz
Date: March 13, 2018 08:09AM
nice place and location.



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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: 3d
Date: March 13, 2018 08:18AM
Quote
Forrest
Sold 2011
Sold 2015
On the market again in 2018
What's wrong with this house?

The property taxes are $14,187 per year!

It looks like the "charm" of living in a 1900 house, in the middle of farmland wears off in 3 years like clockwork. A family that is able to afford a $750k house and $14k in annual taxes usually wants more modern comforts.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: mikebw
Date: March 13, 2018 09:35AM
Quote
3d
Quote
Forrest
Sold 2011
Sold 2015
On the market again in 2018
What's wrong with this house?

The property taxes are $14,187 per year!

It looks like the "charm" of living in a 1900 house, in the middle of farmland wears off in 3 years like clockwork. A family that is able to afford a $750k house and $14k in annual taxes usually wants more modern comforts.

I would agree!
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: vicrock
Date: March 13, 2018 11:01AM
Couple of questions I'd ask about - plumbing - has it been updated? Houses of this vintage usually had cast iron pipes which will eventually need replacement due to scale and calcification. Wiring - updated? Most houses of this vintage have barely adequate wiring, few outlets and fuse boxes with limited capacity.

I grew up in a house built in 1908, and remember some of the associated problems.

Closet space? Our house had minimal closet size, so unless extensive remodeling has been done, you may find that a problem.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: Lew Zealand
Date: March 13, 2018 01:20PM
Quote
Yoyodyne ArtWorks
Quote
Forrest
Sold 2011
Sold 2015
On the market again in 2018
What's wrong with this house?

The property taxes are $14,187 per year!

Bingo, we have a winner! That many short-term owners is a HUGE red flag!

The house next door to us has a similar sales history and it's in excellent shape, 1940s with a recent update by the contractor who lived in it for 3 years. No complaints about the house from anyone who's lived in it but people keep moving in and out.

Must be the neighbors.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: davester
Date: March 13, 2018 02:15PM
I've owned to old (1906 and 1939) houses, and barring inspection findings, I would not hesitate to buy that house. Your concern is misplaced...worry about condition, not year of build. A 10 or 20 year old house is likely to have the same maintenance costs, perhaps more due to the low quality of home construction since roughly the 1960s. Of course, you should get a detailed inspection first which might point out problem areas where renovation hasn't been completed, but then that's true of any house.



"In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion." (1987) -- Carl Sagan



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/13/2018 02:15PM by davester.
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Re: We really liked this house built in 1900
Posted by: bfd
Date: March 13, 2018 08:42PM
In Cali, you wouldn't get a good 2BR condo for that amount. It's all in the comps.

Looks beautiful, though. Concerns might be with plumbing/electrical, but seems like the place has been kept up well. Around here, it'd be labeled "historic', and you'd be really limited on any modifications!
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