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Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: rapayn1
Date: March 16, 2018 12:14PM
Had a Nuclear Stress test done on Monday and an Echo test today. Both CDs were given to me formatted for Windows and I am all Apple here. Searching for heart and Echo keeps bringing me Amazon Echo results. :-)

Is there an app or program I can use that will allow me to view the Echo results without having to resort to installing Bootcamp on my iMac running OS 10.11.6? It is a 27-inch iMac Retina 5K (Late 2015) with 32GBs of RAM, a 4GHz Intel Core i7 processor and an AMD Radeon R9 M395X with 4MB of RAM. I was able to view the Nuclear Stress test files using a free program called OsiriX Lite. Can't find anything free or pay for play that will show me the files on that CD. The disc is named PROSOLV and launching it reveals the following:

_Run_Viewer.bat
autorun.inf
EXAM0
EXAM0.LST
multcom.ax
name
proview
SystemChecker.exe

Opening up the Proview folder reveals 134 files. Mostly .dll files but some ending in .map, .rlx, .ini, .psclic, .flt, .pge, .eqs, .ver, .proan infamous bunch of .exe files and then a read me text file that says:

Synapse Cardiovascular Client - 11/14/2014
_______________________________________________________

Version # 5.1.2000.140

Contact Information
___________________


FUJIFILM Medical Systems USA, Inc. Phone: (800) 755-2150
8021 Knue Road Fax: (317) 594-7439
Indianapolis, IN 46250 E-mail: synapsecv.support@fujifilm.com
Web Site: [www.fujimed.com]



Copyright
_________

Synapse Cardiovascular Client and all related files and documentation is
Copyright 2007-2014 FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

Going to the Synapse website on the FujiFilm website only gives me choices if I am an IT professional or a clinical professional. There does not seem to be a home user application or tool.

[cardiovascular.fujimed.com]
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: hal
Date: March 16, 2018 02:26PM
You need more than bootcamp, you'll need to buy a copy of windows! Is it worth it? I would certainly call that number and tell them that you don't have a windows machine and it would be nice to have a mac version of these files.

Try opening the LST file (and maybe the EXAM0 file) with Textedit - it may just be plain text, but most likely will look like gibberish.
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: davemchine
Date: March 16, 2018 02:43PM
I use OsiriX to read medical cds. Not sure if it would works with your disk but it’s free to try. [www.osirix-viewer.com]
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: Speedy
Date: March 16, 2018 03:11PM
I had a similar problem a decade and a half or so ago. The files put out by the brain scanner were DICOM, information provided to me by the med technician. However, the first CD they provided had some sort of Winblows viewer setup 'for my convenience' just like you were given. They had folded the DICOM images into the (in)convenient Winblows program, thus making them unavailable to my Mac DICOM viewer. I had to go back to the facility to get the plain old DICOM images put out by the scanner (again, on a CD) and then I was good to go, quite probably using OsiriX

I suggest you call to ask the format of the images put out by their scanner. Search the web for an appropriate Mac viewer and if you find one, ask them to burn a CD of just the images, no Winblows viewer needed, thank you very much. Then you should be good to go.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: rapayn1
Date: March 17, 2018 12:46AM
Hal.

I have a copy of Windows. Windows 7. I just didn't want to use it as the last time I did, it was a hassle. I'll try to install it again on an older Mac Mini and run Bootcamp. Was just really hoping for a more elegant solution. Thanks for taking the time to write though. I appreciate it.
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: rapayn1
Date: March 17, 2018 12:49AM
davemchine,

Yes, I have OsiriX. It works well, but only on the DICOM files from the stress test. It didn't do anything with these echo files.
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: rapayn1
Date: March 17, 2018 12:56AM
Speedy,

Yes, your situation sounds exactly like what happened to me. Looks like I have a computer project this Saturday. Reinstall BOOTCAMP and Windows 7 and view the disc that way. Thanks for sharing your story as well.
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: March 17, 2018 10:01AM
Another OsiriX user.

The still images from various scans will open in GraphicConverter.



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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: PeterW
Date: March 17, 2018 10:12AM
What is it in the results of your Stress and Echo that your cardiologist didn’t already bore you to tears about?
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: rapayn1
Date: March 17, 2018 10:18AM
Sarcany,

Thanks for that tip. I have had GraphicConverter for years. Good to know.
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Re: Medical Apps For the Mac?
Posted by: rapayn1
Date: March 17, 2018 11:03AM
PeterW,

What is it that I want to know that the cardiologist didn't already bore me with? Well everything. LOL!!

I am a naturally curious person. It is not every day that I get to see inside my body. So, seeing arteries and valves and how they open and close and know that it is my heart is neat to me.

Obviously nothing was too bad about either test since they have let me go home and to work without any restrictions. No one has said I need to be admitted to a hospital and to be prepped for immediate surgery. :-) Yet, I now have discs that have data on them that I could not easily see/read.

With a little Googling, watching YouTube videos and reading a few articles, I now understand more (better even then with my doctor) about what the DICOM imagery of my recent nuclear stress test means. I now get the meaning of the areas in yellow and purple, red or green. What the darker vs. lighter parts mean and can look at them in the privacy of my home, on my computer, without knowing another patient is out in the waiting room ready to come in next and so, my time is limited with the cardiologist. I now get the whole Perfusion, VLA, HSA, SA, resting image and stress image, short axis and vertical long rest, etc. 2D and 3D images. I can playback the video and animated gifs and see my heart and lungs and stomach in ways I have never seen before.

Bottom line is that the tests were normal. Well, at least the nuclear stress test was. Did not get that answer yet for yesterday's echo test. I just didn't like getting a disc that was made with the assumption I had a Windows computer and so, information on/about my body was inaccessible to me. I wouldn't want to pull up to a gas station needing regular unleaded gas and be given diesel instead. I went to the cardiologist and got a Windows CD when I am an Apple Macintosh guy.

I have the older Mac Mini up and running with Bootcamp and Windows 7 now. It has been a few years since it was used. So, it is in the process of doing about 50K updates and it is reminding me why I hate Windows. Apple updates, Bootcamp updates, Windows updates and service packs, anti-virus definition updates, etc. Sheesh! I hope it will all be finished by late this evening and I can look at the echo data on that CD.
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