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Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 15, 2018 11:37AM
What's everyone using these days? I have the usual, build up of dirt and some areas with mold. We got it semi cleaned up using a 1400 psi power washer with a 40 degree nozzle. Don't want to hurt the wood. That got a lot up, but clearly I need a cleaner. And soon, a sealer. I'd prefer semi transparent. It seems they last 2 years where opaque lasts 3. The wood still looks pretty good so I'd rather save opaque until much later in the wood's life. If I remember correctly, the deck builder used a Cabot semi transparent coating. That was probably 8 or so years ago.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: space-time
Date: April 15, 2018 11:50AM
Quote
Pam
What's everyone using these days? ...

"everyone" uses the cheapest, lowest quality product they find at walmart. You want something of higher quality, therefore, I would not use what "everyone" is using these days. smiling smiley
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 15, 2018 11:52AM
Quote
space-time
Quote
Pam
What's everyone using these days? ...

"everyone" uses the cheapest, lowest quality product they find at walmart. You want something of higher quality, therefore, I would not use what "everyone" is using these days. smiling smiley

But people here aren't "everyone" grinning smiley
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: rgG
Date: April 15, 2018 11:57AM
The Cabot should be a good choice. It is sold at HD, at least one of the Cabot line is.
I have used Flood products in the past and was happy with them, but it has been a few years since I stained a deck





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: space-time
Date: April 15, 2018 12:01PM
Quote
Pam
Quote
space-time
Quote
Pam
What's everyone using these days? ...

"everyone" uses the cheapest, lowest quality product they find at walmart. You want something of higher quality, therefore, I would not use what "everyone" is using these days. smiling smiley

But people here aren't "everyone" grinning smiley

I stand corrected and I apologize!
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: April 15, 2018 12:04PM
Zep deck cleaner in the power washer. Love that stuff on decks and wood siding.

Can't recommend a modern sealer. Been too long since I've sealed a deck.



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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: April 15, 2018 12:16PM
Hi Pam..

don't use a deck cleaner.

What kind of wood?
Size of deck?
Is it a Sunny deck?

After 8 years...


I would suggest that you go to your local tool rental and rent a 12 x 16 or thereabouts, orbital sander..it'll save you a lot of unknowns..most of these 'washing' agents are harmful and really not what you want to do with wood...

Dry the deck out and sand it..find a good clearish coating..the darker the better because, as you noticed, the ones with pigment offer a 'bit' more longevity and certainly more protection..pigment is the protector..not the plasticized coating..gone are the days of real, slow drying and longer lasting, oil based products..the stuff you get these days is basically plastic that dries so fast that it never, ever, gets a chance to bond properly..

These sanders are easy to operate once you get the hang of it and they do a great job...any detailing can be done with hand tool..a random orbital sander..

The greater goal here is to completely remove that 8 year old finish..Even in a 2 year cycle for avid maintenance of a deck..it's best to sand..be a rebel..dont fall for this power wash /power wash with cleanser thing..and don't forget to sand in the cracks like your Aunty told you..



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/15/2018 12:19PM by Kraniac.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 15, 2018 12:29PM
Quote
Kraniac
Hi Pam..

don't use a deck cleaner.

What kind of wood?
Size of deck?
Is it a Sunny deck?

After 8 years...


I would suggest that you go to your local tool rental and rent a 12 x 16 or thereabouts, orbital sander..it'll save you a lot of unknowns..most of these 'washing' agents are harmful and really not what you want to do with wood...

Dry the deck out and sand it..find a good clearish coating..the darker the better because, as you noticed, the ones with pigment offer a 'bit' more longevity and certainly more protection..pigment is the protector..not the plasticized coating..gone are the days of real, slow drying and longer lasting, oil based products..the stuff you get these days is basically plastic that dries so fast that it never, ever, gets a chance to bond properly..

These sanders are easy to operate once you get the hang of it and they do a great job...any detailing can be done with hand tool..a random orbital sander..

The greater goal here is to completely remove that 8 year old finish..Even in a 2 year cycle for avid maintenance of a deck..it's best to sand..be a rebel..dont fall for this power wash /power wash with cleanser thing..and don't forget to sand in the cracks like your Aunty told you..

I have two decks. Both are large, pressure treated lumber. Nothing fancy. The upper deck receives a lot of sun. A third of the lower deck sees a lot of sun. No doubt sanding would be best. That's not too bad on the large horizontal surfaces. The vertical part of the railings would be a pita.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: PeterW
Date: April 15, 2018 12:41PM
Sanding pressure treated pine is a really good way to die. I cannot believe anyone would be so stupid to even try.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: April 15, 2018 12:48PM
Quote
PeterW
Sanding pressure treated pine is a really good way to die. I cannot believe anyone would be so stupid to even try.


It's perfectly fine..wear a good quality dust mask as you should with all wood..being outside helps too..It's done all the time by stupid people like me and many others all over who want to do the job properly.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: April 15, 2018 12:55PM
Quote
Pam
Quote
Kraniac
Hi Pam..

don't use a deck cleaner.

What kind of wood?
Size of deck?
Is it a Sunny deck?

After 8 years...


I would suggest that you go to your local tool rental and rent a 12 x 16 or thereabouts, orbital sander..it'll save you a lot of unknowns..most of these 'washing' agents are harmful and really not what you want to do with wood...

Dry the deck out and sand it..find a good clearish coating..the darker the better because, as you noticed, the ones with pigment offer a 'bit' more longevity and certainly more protection..pigment is the protector..not the plasticized coating..gone are the days of real, slow drying and longer lasting, oil based products..the stuff you get these days is basically plastic that dries so fast that it never, ever, gets a chance to bond properly..

These sanders are easy to operate once you get the hang of it and they do a great job...any detailing can be done with hand tool..a random orbital sander..

The greater goal here is to completely remove that 8 year old finish..Even in a 2 year cycle for avid maintenance of a deck..it's best to sand..be a rebel..dont fall for this power wash /power wash with cleanser thing..and don't forget to sand in the cracks like your Aunty told you..

I have two decks. Both are large, pressure treated lumber. Nothing fancy. The upper deck receives a lot of sun. A third of the lower deck sees a lot of sun. No doubt sanding would be best. That's not too bad on the large horizontal surfaces. The vertical part of the railings would be a pita.

Pam..how large..rough square footage of both?

Treat your verticals and your horizontals as two different things..

The horizontals (deck, duh, i know) are the most important..so sand those..

Come up with a scheme for the verticals n railings..if it's pressure cleansing or whatever..maybe get those prepped and finished, first..

then do your deck..you could probably flip that around but you'd want to protect the finished deck from the cleaning agent if it was me i'd the railings first.

Is there a ton of cupping in the deck boards..you know..where the board becomes concave?

If, over the last 8 years, you've developed serious cupping, then you might want to go the route of cleaning and finishing..bad cupping can be a difficult to sand..reaching the low spots..I've done it many times with typical cupping though.. and usually a couple of passes gets most of it off and then detail with a large random orbital..
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: billb
Date: April 15, 2018 12:58PM
If it's a pre-2003 CCA treated deck you might not want to sand. Just get a cleaner and scrub the mold and mildew off.

For a post-2003 deck likely ACQ or CA treated you could still use a cleaner to get the mold and mildew off, but if you've got opaque stain to remove and especially if you're changing or deleting colored stain, you might want to sand it.

I used to get a year or two more out of Cabot than the cheap stuff except for on horizontal surfaces that baked in the sun .
I,ve also just rolled another coating on in the Fall or Spring where needed without even cleaning when I used to use Thompson's.

Now all I have is a 6x6 'deck' ( more of a stair landing really ) and four steps that have been "painted" with a semi-opaque stain to match the paint of the house. I just clean where the paint hasn't maintained adherence scrape off anything loose and repaint it. Last done over 5 yeas ago.



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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: space-time
Date: April 15, 2018 12:59PM
Quote
PeterW
Sanding pressure treated pine is a really good way to die. I cannot believe anyone would be so stupid to even try.

is it just the dust or there are nasty chemicals in this pressure treated wood?

Thanks
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 15, 2018 01:15PM
Quote
billb
If it's a pre-2003 CCA treated deck you might not want to sand. Just get a cleaner and scrub the mold and mildew off.

For a post-2003 deck likely ACQ or CA treated you could still use a cleaner to get the mold and mildew off, but if you've got opaque stain to remove and especially if you're changing or deleting colored stain, you might want to sand it.

I used to get a year or two more out of Cabot than the cheap stuff except for on horizontal surfaces that baked in the sun .
I,ve also just rolled another coating on in the Fall or Spring where needed without even cleaning when I used to use Thompson's.

Now all I have is a 6x6 'deck' ( more of a stair landing really ) and four steps that have been "painted" with a semi-opaque stain to match the paint of the house. I just clean where the paint hasn't maintained adherence scrape off anything loose and repaint it. Last done over 5 yeas ago.

We're talking post 2003. What I have now replaced the CCA treated lumber.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: PeterW
Date: April 15, 2018 01:16PM
Without “nasty chemicals”, termites turn southern yellow pine into sawdust within a year or two. The current chemicals are not as bad as CCA was (used prior to 2004) but they still are not something you want to breathe. And those particle masks they sell in the big box stores do very little to stop small dangerous particles. With dust, it’s not the particles you can see that you need to worry about.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 15, 2018 01:18PM
Quote
Kraniac
Quote
Pam
Quote
Kraniac
Hi Pam..

don't use a deck cleaner.

What kind of wood?
Size of deck?
Is it a Sunny deck?

After 8 years...


I would suggest that you go to your local tool rental and rent a 12 x 16 or thereabouts, orbital sander..it'll save you a lot of unknowns..most of these 'washing' agents are harmful and really not what you want to do with wood...

Dry the deck out and sand it..find a good clearish coating..the darker the better because, as you noticed, the ones with pigment offer a 'bit' more longevity and certainly more protection..pigment is the protector..not the plasticized coating..gone are the days of real, slow drying and longer lasting, oil based products..the stuff you get these days is basically plastic that dries so fast that it never, ever, gets a chance to bond properly..

These sanders are easy to operate once you get the hang of it and they do a great job...any detailing can be done with hand tool..a random orbital sander..

The greater goal here is to completely remove that 8 year old finish..Even in a 2 year cycle for avid maintenance of a deck..it's best to sand..be a rebel..dont fall for this power wash /power wash with cleanser thing..and don't forget to sand in the cracks like your Aunty told you..

I have two decks. Both are large, pressure treated lumber. Nothing fancy. The upper deck receives a lot of sun. A third of the lower deck sees a lot of sun. No doubt sanding would be best. That's not too bad on the large horizontal surfaces. The vertical part of the railings would be a pita.

Pam..how large..rough square footage of both?

Treat your verticals and your horizontals as two different things..

The horizontals (deck, duh, i know) are the most important..so sand those..

Come up with a scheme for the verticals n railings..if it's pressure cleansing or whatever..maybe get those prepped and finished, first..

then do your deck..you could probably flip that around but you'd want to protect the finished deck from the cleaning agent if it was me i'd the railings first.

Is there a ton of cupping in the deck boards..you know..where the board becomes concave?

If, over the last 8 years, you've developed serious cupping, then you might want to go the route of cleaning and finishing..bad cupping can be a difficult to sand..reaching the low spots..I've done it many times with typical cupping though.. and usually a couple of passes gets most of it off and then detail with a large random orbital..

We're talking 200 sqft. Each. No cupping.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: April 15, 2018 01:25PM
Quote
Pam
Quote
Kraniac
Quote
Pam
Quote
Kraniac
Hi Pam..

don't use a deck cleaner.

What kind of wood?
Size of deck?
Is it a Sunny deck?

After 8 years...


I would suggest that you go to your local tool rental and rent a 12 x 16 or thereabouts, orbital sander..it'll save you a lot of unknowns..most of these 'washing' agents are harmful and really not what you want to do with wood...

Dry the deck out and sand it..find a good clearish coating..the darker the better because, as you noticed, the ones with pigment offer a 'bit' more longevity and certainly more protection..pigment is the protector..not the plasticized coating..gone are the days of real, slow drying and longer lasting, oil based products..the stuff you get these days is basically plastic that dries so fast that it never, ever, gets a chance to bond properly..

These sanders are easy to operate once you get the hang of it and they do a great job...any detailing can be done with hand tool..a random orbital sander..

The greater goal here is to completely remove that 8 year old finish..Even in a 2 year cycle for avid maintenance of a deck..it's best to sand..be a rebel..dont fall for this power wash /power wash with cleanser thing..and don't forget to sand in the cracks like your Aunty told you..

I have two decks. Both are large, pressure treated lumber. Nothing fancy. The upper deck receives a lot of sun. A third of the lower deck sees a lot of sun. No doubt sanding would be best. That's not too bad on the large horizontal surfaces. The vertical part of the railings would be a pita.

Pam..how large..rough square footage of both?

Treat your verticals and your horizontals as two different things..

The horizontals (deck, duh, i know) are the most important..so sand those..

Come up with a scheme for the verticals n railings..if it's pressure cleansing or whatever..maybe get those prepped and finished, first..

then do your deck..you could probably flip that around but you'd want to protect the finished deck from the cleaning agent if it was me i'd the railings first.

Is there a ton of cupping in the deck boards..you know..where the board becomes concave?

If, over the last 8 years, you've developed serious cupping, then you might want to go the route of cleaning and finishing..bad cupping can be a difficult to sand..reaching the low spots..I've done it many times with typical cupping though.. and usually a couple of passes gets most of it off and then detail with a large random orbital..

We're talking 200 sqft. Each. No cupping.

Easy Peasy, IMO..I'd sand.

Are you doing this project? hub? Flock of cousins?

take some pics, could you? I'd be interested in seeing the deck surfaces and the railing set up..
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 15, 2018 01:52PM
[s296.photobucket.com]

Only one board on the upper deck has popped up. That'll be easy to nail back down.

Edit: only pressure washed the lower deck so far



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/15/2018 01:56PM by Pam.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: J Marston
Date: April 15, 2018 03:29PM
A very large majority of deck cleaners use sodium hypochlorite or its variants: in other words, bleach. It's not good for wood (or composite decking). Sand it.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 15, 2018 03:35PM
Quote
J Marston
A very large majority of deck cleaners use sodium hypochlorite or its variants: in other words, bleach. It's not good for wood (or composite decking). Sand it.

Definitely not using sodium hypochlorite or a chlorine bleach product. I had considered a homemade potion of 1/2 cup of oxyclean to 2 gallons of water.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: April 15, 2018 08:05PM
had a chance to look..Top deck ..sand it for sure...it's taken quite a bit of weathering and is silvering out..not good to blast it with cleaning products and pressure.

If you're doing this soon, I'd do the railings first..dry out the deck well..then sand it and get finish on ASAP..if it gets a good rain on it after sanding? you'll be sanding it again if you care about the job..which you do.

You're looking for about a 12 x 16 orbital sander..flat plate that vibrates/oscillates..On most decks i take it to 80 grit and put finish down..Usually a couple of passes with 80 are what it takes..You will have some detailing to do around posts and corners etc..no biggy..

Like said before, if you're going for one more round of the 'wood' look upstairs..get the darkest one for max protection..

If the weather gets dodgy after sanding put down plastic and tarp the deck by tenting it best you can..watch the weather tho.

As for the lower deck..doesn't look it takes much real weather..sun is being diffused by screen which actually does quite a bit..

But..if you're gonna refinish it..sand it..Looks that finish is on pretty good as it gets closer to the house.. i mean..it doesn't look all that bad in the pics..
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 15, 2018 08:35PM
Quote
Kraniac
had a chance to look..Top deck ..sand it for sure...it's taken quite a bit of weathering and is silvering out..not good to blast it with cleaning products and pressure.

If you're doing this soon, I'd do the railings first..dry out the deck well..then sand it and get finish on ASAP..if it gets a good rain on it after sanding? you'll be sanding it again if you care about the job..which you do.

You're looking for about a 12 x 16 orbital sander..flat plate that vibrates/oscillates..On most decks i take it to 80 grit and put finish down..Usually a couple of passes with 80 are what it takes..You will have some detailing to do around posts and corners etc..no biggy..

Like said before, if you're going for one more round of the 'wood' look upstairs..get the darkest one for max protection..

If the weather gets dodgy after sanding put down plastic and tarp the deck by tenting it best you can..watch the weather tho.

As for the lower deck..doesn't look it takes much real weather..sun is being diffused by screen which actually does quite a bit..

But..if you're gonna refinish it..sand it..Looks that finish is on pretty good as it gets closer to the house.. i mean..it doesn't look all that bad in the pics..

The lower deck needs a better cleaning. There is some mold in the furthest corner and some areas where the dirt didn't come up. Even with a deck brush. I may try the water/oxiclean in that corner first. Upper deck, I may go for an opaque. It takes a brutal beating. The horizontal portions of the railing too. I have to stick with semi transparent elsewhere otherwise the two-tone look will look silly. And give unnecessary fodder to the HOA.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: April 15, 2018 09:38PM
....to clean a deck of cards....??


....my cards are dirty......



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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: tortoise
Date: April 15, 2018 11:07PM
We have a deck similar to yours and have maintained it using Penofin products over the past eight years. They have two chemical cleaners that do a nice job preparing and restoring the redwood for refinishing. The #2 cleaner does lightly discolored and tannin coated woods, while the #3 brightener brings back the lightness of the original redwood. They are in powder form then mixed with water and applied with common spray tanks and scrubbed with brushes and rinsed with water. Link to their main page below, scroll down for the cleaners and read more. It is a fair amount of work but the results are always amazing, when our deck once again looks almost as good as when it was brand new.

[www.penofin.com]
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 16, 2018 05:59AM
Quote
tortoise
We have a deck similar to yours and have maintained it using Penofin products over the past eight years. They have two chemical cleaners that do a nice job preparing and restoring the redwood for refinishing. The #2 cleaner does lightly discolored and tannin coated woods, while the #3 brightener brings back the lightness of the original redwood. They are in powder form then mixed with water and applied with common spray tanks and scrubbed with brushes and rinsed with water. Link to their main page below, scroll down for the cleaners and read more. It is a fair amount of work but the results are always amazing, when our deck once again looks almost as good as when it was brand new.

[www.penofin.com]

I've read good things about Penofin. Their #2 is like my oxiclean mix. I think the #3 is an oxalate to restore ph. Although some feel it's not necessary. I assume you used one of their stains post cleaning?
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: tortoise
Date: April 16, 2018 09:35AM
Quote
Pam
Quote
tortoise
We have a deck similar to yours and have maintained it using Penofin products over the past eight years. They have two chemical cleaners that do a nice job preparing and restoring the redwood for refinishing. The #2 cleaner does lightly discolored and tannin coated woods, while the #3 brightener brings back the lightness of the original redwood. They are in powder form then mixed with water and applied with common spray tanks and scrubbed with brushes and rinsed with water. Link to their main page below, scroll down for the cleaners and read more. It is a fair amount of work but the results are always amazing, when our deck once again looks almost as good as when it was brand new.

[www.penofin.com]

I've read good things about Penofin. Their #2 is like my oxiclean mix. I think the #3 is an oxalate to restore ph. Although some feel it's not necessary. I assume you used one of their stains post cleaning?

Yes I have been using their Premium Blue Label stain and will likely do it again this year, but I confess I am considering using a deck paint for longer life and reduced expense. The natural Redwood is beautiful but only looks that way for one or two years. It is a lot of work to clear the deck and do all the treatments and stains and frankly I am getting lazy and may consider a less elegant but more practical and longer lasting finish. By the way after the cleaning it is necessary to use some sort of stain as the redwood is almost a bleached appearance and the oils in the stains are necessary to protect the now exposed wood.

[www.dropbox.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/16/2018 10:16AM by tortoise.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: Pam
Date: April 16, 2018 10:26AM
Quote
tortoise
Quote
Pam
Quote
tortoise
We have a deck similar to yours and have maintained it using Penofin products over the past eight years. They have two chemical cleaners that do a nice job preparing and restoring the redwood for refinishing. The #2 cleaner does lightly discolored and tannin coated woods, while the #3 brightener brings back the lightness of the original redwood. They are in powder form then mixed with water and applied with common spray tanks and scrubbed with brushes and rinsed with water. Link to their main page below, scroll down for the cleaners and read more. It is a fair amount of work but the results are always amazing, when our deck once again looks almost as good as when it was brand new.

[www.penofin.com]

I've read good things about Penofin. Their #2 is like my oxiclean mix. I think the #3 is an oxalate to restore ph. Although some feel it's not necessary. I assume you used one of their stains post cleaning?

Yes I have been using their Premium Blue Label stain and will likely do it again this year, but I confess I am considering using a deck paint for longer life and reduced expense. The natural Redwood is beautiful but only looks that way for one or two years. It is a lot of work to clear the deck and do all the treatments and stains and frankly I am getting lazy and may consider a less elegant but more practical and longer lasting finish. By the way after the cleaning it is necessary to use some sort of stain as the redwood is almost a bleached appearance and the oils in the stains are necessary to protect the now exposed wood.

[www.dropbox.com]

It's a terrible shame a look like that cannot be preserved for longer periods of time. Painting just seems sacrilegious.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: tortoise
Date: April 16, 2018 10:50AM
Quote
Pam
Quote
tortoise
Quote
Pam
Quote
tortoise
We have a deck similar to yours and have maintained it using Penofin products over the past eight years. They have two chemical cleaners that do a nice job preparing and restoring the redwood for refinishing. The #2 cleaner does lightly discolored and tannin coated woods, while the #3 brightener brings back the lightness of the original redwood. They are in powder form then mixed with water and applied with common spray tanks and scrubbed with brushes and rinsed with water. Link to their main page below, scroll down for the cleaners and read more. It is a fair amount of work but the results are always amazing, when our deck once again looks almost as good as when it was brand new.

[www.penofin.com]

I've read good things about Penofin. Their #2 is like my oxiclean mix. I think the #3 is an oxalate to restore ph. Although some feel it's not necessary. I assume you used one of their stains post cleaning?

Yes I have been using their Premium Blue Label stain and will likely do it again this year, but I confess I am considering using a deck paint for longer life and reduced expense. The natural Redwood is beautiful but only looks that way for one or two years. It is a lot of work to clear the deck and do all the treatments and stains and frankly I am getting lazy and may consider a less elegant but more practical and longer lasting finish. By the way after the cleaning it is necessary to use some sort of stain as the redwood is almost a bleached appearance and the oils in the stains are necessary to protect the now exposed wood.

[www.dropbox.com]

It's a terrible shame a look like that cannot be preserved for longer periods of time. Painting just seems sacrilegious.

I agree with you Pam 100%, however at age 74, my priorities are changing and I just have better things to do with my time than the annual spring rite of doing the deck, our garden keeps me busy enough without the deck.
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: April 16, 2018 11:30AM
......hit the.....deck......



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I reject your reality and substitute my own!
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: decay
Date: April 16, 2018 01:30PM
I find the old-fashioned way of using a deck brush works better than powerwashing, with less chance of damage.

[www.quickie.com]

Yes, it's hard work. But the results are great. I have used a simple bucket of hot water & Dawn liquid.



---
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Re: Deck cleaners and sealers
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: April 16, 2018 01:41PM
.....would Dusk liquid work just as well.....???



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