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How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: WHiiP
Date: June 13, 2018 07:08AM
This article is from Appleworld Today. Dennis Sellers mentions the source: Since the Malwarebytes app showed that my iMac was “clean,” I decided to check things out manually using instructions I found at the very useful Dr. Cleaner website.

Here’s how to do this:

First, open the Finder and type Shift+command+G. A pop-up box dubbed “Go to the folder” will appear.

Then, type the following three commands respectively:

~/Library/LaunchAgents

/Library/LaunchAgents

/Library/LaunchDaemons

Click “Go” and check whether there is any weird looking plists or ones with garbled/random file name. If you find some, delete ‘em and restart your Mac. Removing all plists with adobe in the name fixed my problem.

By the way, a plist file is a settings file, also known as a "properties file," used by macOS applications. It contains properties and configuration settings for various programs.



FYI

Found this posting on MacSurfer.



Bill
Flagler Beach, FL 32136

Carpe Vino!

Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire.
— David Rains Wallace



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/13/2018 07:13AM by WHiiP.
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Re: How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: June 13, 2018 09:39AM
Wow. Dennis Sellers.

There's a name I haven't seen in like— forever. I remember him from MacCentral and that big tabloid-style, free computer newpaper.




When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men
except by believing all possible evil
of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

Mister, that's a ten-gallon hat on a twenty-gallon head.

I *love* Sigs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: June 13, 2018 10:23AM
Quote
RAMd®d
Wow. Dennis Sellers.

There's a name I haven't seen in like— forever. I remember him from MacCentral and that big tabloid-style, free computer newpaper.

Might you be thinking of MacWeek? That was a tabloid-size print publication.
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Re: How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: Buck
Date: June 13, 2018 11:30AM
Thank you. All I found were files from Dropbox, Microsoft, and Malwarebytes.
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Re: How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: June 13, 2018 12:29PM
Might you be thinking of MacWeek?

No...

It might have been something like Computer Shopper, the US version.

I remember it being free, in a a help-yourself news stand, along with other newspaper stands at a local post office. There were the regular newspapers, The Classified Flea Market, and this computer newspaper.

It was black and white though, and maybe a little bigger than tabloid, but smaller than full size. It was PC centric and I don't remember much Mac stuff in it, ever.




When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men
except by believing all possible evil
of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

Mister, that's a ten-gallon hat on a twenty-gallon head.

I *love* Sigs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: btfc
Date: June 13, 2018 01:11PM
Some other places to check:

[www.thesafemac.com]

The article is dated, so the names of items may have changed, but the mentioned locations are still relevant.
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Re: How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: June 13, 2018 09:52PM
Quote
WHiiP
This article is from Appleworld Today. Dennis Sellers mentions the source: Since the Malwarebytes app showed that my iMac was “clean,” I decided to check things out manually using instructions I found at the very useful Dr. Cleaner website.

Here’s how to do this:

First, open the Finder and type Shift+command+G. A pop-up box dubbed “Go to the folder” will appear.

Then, type the following three commands respectively:

~/Library/LaunchAgents

/Library/LaunchAgents

/Library/LaunchDaemons

Click “Go” and check whether there is any weird looking plists or ones with garbled/random file name. If you find some, delete ‘em and restart your Mac. Removing all plists with adobe in the name fixed my problem.

By the way, a plist file is a settings file, also known as a "properties file," used by macOS applications. It contains properties and configuration settings for various programs.



FYI

Found this posting on MacSurfer.

Great way to hose a bunch of apps.

Don't toss anything without Googling first to see what you're tossing.



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Re: How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: freeradical
Date: June 13, 2018 11:22PM
I thought you could safely delete any .plist file, and the app would simply make a new one.
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Re: How to check for malware and ‘bad’ plists manually on your Mac
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: June 14, 2018 12:13AM
Quote
freeradical
I thought you could safely delete any .plist file, and the app would simply make a new one.

"Plist" files in the LaunchAgents and LaunchDaemons folders are special. They are support files for Launch Daemons and Launch Agents. Launch Daemons are faceless background tasks that run all the time. Launch Agents are similar tasks that run when the user is logged in. If you remove the plist files from those folders, you will (in most cases) prevent those tasks from running and any program that depends upon them will end up having problems.

Plist files in your hidden ~/Library/Preferences folder are mostly just ordinary pref files (and occasionally contain registration info so you should be careful about what you toss from there, too). It's sometimes helpful to remove preference files to troubleshoot an application, tho more often than not the fix will be tossing the application's cache and/or rebooting.



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