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Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: 3d
Date: November 09, 2018 12:36PM
Facebook Marketplace shows a seller near me selling what he calls "Reclaimed Lumber".
It's tongue and groove. And extremely thick. 2.5" x 7.5" x 20'
Are these floorboards from a factory or something? Looks like maybe they survived a fire.

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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: Grateful11
Date: November 09, 2018 12:47PM
I'm with you, I think they came out of an old factory. If ran through a thickness sander or planer they
would probably be awesome. The growth rings look kinda wide, not sure if it's old growth timber or not.
The black stuff on them is probably from something that was applied to them at some point.



Grateful11
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: JoeH
Date: November 09, 2018 12:51PM
Factory flooring is a possibility, or gym floor.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: 3d
Date: November 09, 2018 12:56PM
Quote
Grateful11
I'm with you, I think they came out of an old factory. If ran through a thickness sander or planer they
would probably be awesome. The growth rings look kinda wide, not sure if it's old growth timber or not.

At 20' long, one board would span my entire living room. Interesting about the growth rings. One thing is for sure, walking on these floorboards will be squeak free smiling smiley
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: lost in space
Date: November 09, 2018 01:05PM
Looks like some kind of low grade softwood, like pine or fir. Gym floors are usually maple or some other hardwood and much thinner, so these are more likely factory or some such flooring, especially considering the thickness. Pretty wide spacing on the growth rings, and some were cut from the center of the tree, sign of low grade since it would not be dimensionally stable over time. You might have trouble finding someone with industrial planer capability to agree to run them due to the risk of nails or other old detritus nicking or gumming up their planer blades. Great potential for something . . . .



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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: November 09, 2018 01:13PM
Quote
lost in space
Looks like some kind of low grade softwood, like pine or fir. Gym floors are usually maple or some other hardwood and much thinner, so these are more likely factory or some such flooring, especially considering the thickness. Pretty wide spacing on the growth rings, and some were cut from the center of the tree, sign of low grade since it would not be dimensionally stable over time. You might have trouble finding someone with industrial planer capability to agree to run them due to the risk of nails or other old detritus nicking or gumming up their planer blades. Great potential for something . . . .

agree smiley

I'd guess the dark areas on the surface is the residue of an adhesive, tar paper or such.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: November 09, 2018 01:15PM
most likely Yellow pine, typically used as flooring because it's harder and stronger than other pine variations.

could be industrial flooring but, mebbe not...I've seen it in old Res buildings..though, usually not in 2by thickness..it's usually typical 3/4 tongue in groove yellow pine over rough board sub-floor.

i work quite a bit in a wood house that has 2x6 yellow pine sub-floor with ash over it as finish flooring..the ceilings below are the bottoms of the yellow pine sub floor, quite beautiful.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: 3d
Date: November 09, 2018 01:24PM
Ok, so I think it's safe to say these boards are not heirloom quality old growth heartwood from 500 year old Appalachian trees. I'll pass.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: mikebw
Date: November 09, 2018 01:24PM
Quote
DeusxMac
Quote
lost in space
Looks like some kind of low grade softwood, like pine or fir. Gym floors are usually maple or some other hardwood and much thinner, so these are more likely factory or some such flooring, especially considering the thickness. Pretty wide spacing on the growth rings, and some were cut from the center of the tree, sign of low grade since it would not be dimensionally stable over time. You might have trouble finding someone with industrial planer capability to agree to run them due to the risk of nails or other old detritus nicking or gumming up their planer blades. Great potential for something . . . .

agree smiley

I'd guess the dark areas on the surface is the residue of an adhesive, tar paper or such.

Yeah, I am thinking these were on a roof. Softer woods are not great for floors, but are fine up top where you would have tar paper and slate or shingles over them. I've seen tongue and groove used on roofs (rooves?) on older homes where plywood was not really available yet. Also, for that length it would make more sense to have come from a roof instead of a single room inside a building.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: JoeH
Date: November 09, 2018 01:27PM
Originally tongue and groove hardwood flooring was 5/4" lumber, and that meant exactly that - 1.25" thick. Yellow pine was available with the same thickness, used in non-main rooms or as the center for a floor that was going to have a rug with hardwood flooring showing around it.

5/4" lumber was also used for hardwood and yellow pine stair treads. Working in older homes I have dealt with this. Finding a lumber yard that carries 5/4"boards now can be a pain, it was a lot easier back in the '70's and '80's. Now it usually is a special order.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: billb
Date: November 09, 2018 01:39PM
Before 5/4 became a standard for god knows why it was common to engineer for spans and loads. That could have been a flat roof with thick boards for snow loads and that is tar or adhesive ( or both ) .



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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: November 09, 2018 02:20PM
.....Apple prefers.....thin.....ner.......



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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: November 09, 2018 02:34PM
Metal detector BEFORE planing.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: mikebw
Date: November 09, 2018 02:40PM
Quote
cbelt3
Metal detector BEFORE planing.

What, no incredible story to go with this undoubtedly learned advice?? smiling smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/09/2018 02:41PM by mikebw.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: November 09, 2018 02:59PM
Quote
mikebw
Quote
cbelt3
Metal detector BEFORE planing.

What, no incredible story to go with this undoubtedly learned advice?? smiling smiley
Surprisingly no.... my father in law just beat that idea into my head. I once took an entire 2x10 deck apart and planed all the boards to renew it. And I was super careful to check each board for bits. Apparently a planer will usually eat a low grade nail, but it notches the blade and spews shrapnel into the guards.
Not ALL my tool usage results in blood sacrifices to the Tool Gods.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: November 09, 2018 03:51PM
I was thinking shipping dock/warehouse built around 1935.



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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: Speedy
Date: November 09, 2018 04:35PM
Ask the seller.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: bruceko
Date: November 09, 2018 08:37PM
probably car decking. used alot for roofing when you want it exposed as the ceiling. black on it is probably residue from tar paper on the roof side
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Re: Tongue and Groove reclaimed lumber is THICK. Are these floorboards??
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: November 10, 2018 12:57PM
Quote
mikebw
Quote
DeusxMac
Quote
lost in space
Looks like some kind of low grade softwood, like pine or fir. Gym floors are usually maple or some other hardwood and much thinner, so these are more likely factory or some such flooring, especially considering the thickness. Pretty wide spacing on the growth rings, and some were cut from the center of the tree, sign of low grade since it would not be dimensionally stable over time. You might have trouble finding someone with industrial planer capability to agree to run them due to the risk of nails or other old detritus nicking or gumming up their planer blades. Great potential for something . . . .

agree smiley

I'd guess the dark areas on the surface is the residue of an adhesive, tar paper or such.

Yeah, I am thinking these were on a roof. Softer woods are not great for floors, but are fine up top where you would have tar paper and slate or shingles over them. I've seen tongue and groove used on roofs (rooves?) on older homes where plywood was not really available yet. Also, for that length it would make more sense to have come from a roof instead of a single room inside a building.

Most likely the planks from a plank and timber structure. The planks were much thicker than most other tongue and groove planks due to the greater span between support structure. Based upon their appearance, I wouldn't be surprised if they were the roof deck planks.
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