advertisement
Forums

The Forum is sponsored by 
 

AAPL stock: Click Here

You are currently viewing the Tips and Deals forum
Help me identify this battery
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: December 29, 2018 01:07PM
After reading MrNoBody's post, I figured I would try resurrecting my wife's pore cleaner.

Took it apart to find a Panasonic 1.2 v ni-cad battery with pins on either end. Pins appear to be part of the battery. The size of the battery appears to be AA. Google search revealed nothing. Tried posting a picture, but for some reason, it won't show up.

Any idea what type of battery this is and where I could get one?
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: space-time
Date: December 29, 2018 01:17PM
Quote
macphanatic
After reading MrNoBody's post, I figured I would try resurrecting my wife's pore cleaner.

Took it apart to find a Panasonic 1.2 v ni-cad battery with pins on either end. Pins appear to be part of the battery. The size of the battery appears to be AA. Google search revealed nothing. Tried posting a picture, but for some reason, it won't show up.

Any idea what type of battery this is and where I could get one?

[www.parts-express.com]


google "AA with tabs" for more pictures, more options. Make sure you get NiCd and not MiNH
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: GGD
Date: December 29, 2018 01:18PM
Something like this? (Solder tabs is the term used for these)



[www.amazon.com]

Or these



[www.amazon.com]
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: Pat
Date: December 29, 2018 01:41PM
With pins
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: MrNoBody
Date: December 29, 2018 01:43PM
Make sure you get NiCd and not MiNH
s-t is correct unless you're willing to replace the stock charger
with a NiMH unit of the same voltage. A cheap, NiCad charger will
eventually ''cook" a NiMH.
btw, just because it's a 1.2v battery doesn't mean the charger will
have the same voltage. My Braun uses 2.4v total batteries but the charger is rated @ 12vdc!



N39° 39.7234', W075° 33.9788'
"I Call Shenanigans!"
-Kyle Broflovski

“If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself.”
-Albert Einstein

Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: space-time
Date: December 29, 2018 01:51PM
Quote
Pat
With pins

excellent find, but most (all?) of those images are NiMH. I didn't see a NiCd in there, but that doesn't mean they don't exist.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/29/2018 01:53PM by space-time.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: JoeH
Date: December 29, 2018 02:11PM
Quote
MrNoBody
Make sure you get NiCd and not MiNH
s-t is correct unless you're willing to replace the stock charger
with a NiMH unit of the same voltage. A cheap, NiCad charger will
eventually ''cook" a NiMH.
btw, just because it's a 1.2v battery doesn't mean the charger will
have the same voltage. My Braun uses 2.4v total batteries but the charger is rated @ 12vdc!

That probably means the charging circuit is built into your Braun, not based on the power adapter.

Sometimes research will show that a particular device was designed to use either NiCd or NiMH cells. If that is the case, then you can substitute NiMH for NiCd batteries. For example, I bought Uniden wireless phones for my home 8 years ago. The original NiCd batteries included for the handsets showed a significant loss of capacity after a year plus of use. I replaced them with NiMH batteries, that also happened to be of higher capacity, those are still doing quite well 7 years later. I usually get about a week between recharges, initially it was about 10 days.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: space-time
Date: December 29, 2018 02:18PM
Quote
JoeH
Quote
MrNoBody
Make sure you get NiCd and not MiNH
s-t is correct unless you're willing to replace the stock charger
with a NiMH unit of the same voltage. A cheap, NiCad charger will
eventually ''cook" a NiMH.
btw, just because it's a 1.2v battery doesn't mean the charger will
have the same voltage. My Braun uses 2.4v total batteries but the charger is rated @ 12vdc!

That probably means the charging circuit is built into your Braun, not based on the power adapter.

Sometimes research will show that a particular device was designed to use either NiCd or NiMH cells. If that is the case, then you can substitute NiMH for NiCd batteries. For example, I bought Uniden wireless phones for my home 8 years ago. The original NiCd batteries included for the handsets showed a significant loss of capacity after a year plus of use. I replaced them with NiMH batteries, that also happened to be of higher capacity, those are still doing quite well 7 years later. I usually get about a week between recharges, initially it was about 10 days.

was the Uniden specifically labeled as taking both NiCd or MiHN?
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: December 29, 2018 02:20PM
Quote
Pat
With pins

Thanks. That's exactly what the battery looks like. Cheapest I can find one for is $18. Not sure that I want to try to resurrect the device for that price as a new one is just less than twice the cost of the battery. Big gamble to take that it's only the battery that's bad.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: space-time
Date: December 29, 2018 02:32PM
you can use a normal AA with some wires soldered on to check if the motor is still running, before you spend $18 on a new battery

Also like I mentioned, the shape may be the same, but most of the images showed NiMH when I opened that link, you said you need NiCd
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: JoeH
Date: December 29, 2018 02:57PM
Quote
space-time
Quote
JoeH
Quote
MrNoBody
Make sure you get NiCd and not MiNH
s-t is correct unless you're willing to replace the stock charger
with a NiMH unit of the same voltage. A cheap, NiCad charger will
eventually ''cook" a NiMH.
btw, just because it's a 1.2v battery doesn't mean the charger will
have the same voltage. My Braun uses 2.4v total batteries but the charger is rated @ 12vdc!

That probably means the charging circuit is built into your Braun, not based on the power adapter.

Sometimes research will show that a particular device was designed to use either NiCd or NiMH cells. If that is the case, then you can substitute NiMH for NiCd batteries. For example, I bought Uniden wireless phones for my home 8 years ago. The original NiCd batteries included for the handsets showed a significant loss of capacity after a year plus of use. I replaced them with NiMH batteries, that also happened to be of higher capacity, those are still doing quite well 7 years later. I usually get about a week between recharges, initially it was about 10 days.

was the Uniden specifically labeled as taking both NiCd or MiHN?

Not specifically on the handsets, but a little research found information that the same handsets took an optional NiMH battery pack as an upgrade from the NiCd one. About the only difference I see is that the discharge curve is a bit different so the battery level shown drops from "Full" to about half quickly. Then it stays there much longer than when the NiCd pack was used.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: MrNoBody
Date: December 29, 2018 05:23PM
Quote
macphanatic
...
Thanks. That's exactly what the battery looks like. Cheapest I can find one for is $18. Not sure that I want to try to resurrect the device for that price as a new one is just less than twice the cost of the battery. Big gamble to take that it's only the battery that's bad.

If you're comfortable with soldering, you can get a lead-less NICD,
(2 for $4 Amz) pull the + pin & rubber cap from the original, solder that pin to the
+ terminal of the new btry., slide the cap over it and reinstall. The
negative end will work as-is. Just make sure you 'rough up' the
+ terminal of the new battery and the base of the pulled pin with
an emery board/fine file and a hemostat would also make the job easier.

There's also a YouTube vid that shows replacing that style battery in a Panasonic ES LT 41 Shaver using a 'tab lead' AA by folding the tabs to where they resemble accordian springs. That model uses a lithium btry but the principle is the same. No soldering required too!



N39° 39.7234', W075° 33.9788'
"I Call Shenanigans!"
-Kyle Broflovski

“If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself.”
-Albert Einstein

Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: December 29, 2018 07:24PM
......is it assaultAnd.......battery....??



____________________________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help me identify this battery
Posted by: GGD
Date: December 29, 2018 08:10PM
Quote
MrNoBody
If you're comfortable with soldering, you can get a lead-less NICD,
(2 for $4 Amz)

The Amazon product description for that battery is pretty impressive. I do wonder what will arrive if you order. Lots of room for "Product not as described".

Quote

Product description

This is a CMOS 8-bit successive approximation A/D converter that uses a differential potentiometric ladder-similar to the 256R products. This converter is designed to allow operation with the NSC800 and INS8080A derivative control bus with TRI-STATE output latches directly driving the data bus. This A/D appears like memorylocations or I/O ports to the microprocessor and no interfacing logic is needed.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login

Online Users

Guests: 284
Record Number of Users: 52 on November 20, 2014
Record Number of Guests: 2330 on October 25, 2018