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I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: January 11, 2019 04:24AM
There was right and there was wrong. There was no in between. You knew what was right, and you did the right thing.

One of the coolest TV cowboys ever to walk a western set was Hoby Gillman, Texas Ranger, on Trackdown.

Here's a little sample of that show:

[youtu.be]

I have fond memories of that show. One day my girlfriend gave me a DVD of a few episodes. As good as I remembered.




When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men
except by believing all possible evil
of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

Perfection is the enemy of progress. -Winston Churchill

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

Mister, that's a ten-gallon hat on a twenty-gallon head.

I *love* Sigs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: mstudio
Date: January 11, 2019 05:41AM
I totally agree, nothing compares today. I always liked The Rifleman, always a lesson to learn. A good father teaching his son what was right and what was wrong.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: Michael
Date: January 11, 2019 05:51AM
Rawhide!

And I loved the Rawhide song that the Blues Brothers did (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri83v76PXdE).
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: SteveO
Date: January 11, 2019 06:07AM
Quote
RAMd®d
There was right and there was wrong. There was no in between. You knew what was right, and you did the right thing.

One of the coolest TV cowboys ever to walk a western set was Hoby Gillman, Texas Ranger, on Trackdown.

Here's a little sample of that show:

[youtu.be]

I have fond memories of that show. One day my girlfriend gave me a DVD of a few episodes. As good as I remembered.

POMTL. That. Is. Awesome.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: MrNoBody
Date: January 11, 2019 06:07AM
You are the target demographic for Heroes & Icons, Grit, and MeTV networks.
Shows include:
Maverick
Wanted Dead or Alive
Have Gun, Will Travel
Rawhide
Trackdown
The Rifleman
Zane Grey Theater
Death Valley Days
The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp
Wagon Train


COZI (NBC) also has westerns including The Lone Ranger !

Yippee Ki Yay



N39° 39.7234', W075° 33.9788'
"I Call Shenanigans!"
-Kyle Broflovski

“If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself.”
-Albert Einstein





Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/11/2019 06:21AM by MrNoBody.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: Bernie
Date: January 11, 2019 06:16AM
Okay.
I watched it.

The beauty of the times. No social programs, just Church and Family. Every gender identifying Man carried a gun and maybe a riffle too.

Cheating at cards or stealing a cow or horse would get you dead no questions asked.

There were no Gun free zones or safe places. Nine One One was probably a train locomotive.

No social programs, just Church and Family.

State and federal inheritance taxes began after 1900, while the states (but not the federal government) began collecting sales taxes in the 1930s. The United States imposed income taxes briefly during the Civil War and the 1890s. In 1913, the 16th Amendment was ratified, permanently legalizing an income tax.

Male lifespan, 50 years.

Edit....
I guess I was the only one that watched it?




Staunton, Virginia



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/11/2019 06:18AM by Bernie.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: January 11, 2019 06:27AM
....my heroes.....have always.....been cowboys.....



____________________________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: bazookaman
Date: January 11, 2019 07:53AM





__________________________________
Never underestimate the predictability of stupidity
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: Michael
Date: January 11, 2019 10:37AM
I went back and watched it, as well.

It's pretty cool.

Interesting that it was posted on Youtube on 11/4/2016, 4 days before, well, what day was that???
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: January 11, 2019 10:38AM
.....Justified......



____________________________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: rich in distress
Date: January 11, 2019 11:29AM
I wholeheartedly agree with the OP.
Yet, what I’m here to say is, in my best Apu impersonation:
Turu, tu turu, tu turu, tu turu, tu turu...



• back to confinement



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/11/2019 11:36AM by rich in distress.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: January 11, 2019 05:12PM
....assless chaps.....



____________________________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: January 11, 2019 07:12PM
Maverick
Wanted Dead or Alive
Have Gun, Will Travel
Rawhide
Trackdown
The Rifleman
Zane Grey Theater
Death Valley Days
The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp
Wagon Train


And that's maybe a quarter of the cowboy shows I watched.

I really liked The Rifleman but for a lesson at the end of each episode, nothing compares to The Lone Ranger. Clayton Moore walked the walk.




When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men
except by believing all possible evil
of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

Perfection is the enemy of progress. -Winston Churchill

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

Mister, that's a ten-gallon hat on a twenty-gallon head.

I *love* Sigs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: vision63
Date: January 11, 2019 07:52PM
Quote
RAMd®d
Maverick
Wanted Dead or Alive
Have Gun, Will Travel
Rawhide
Trackdown
The Rifleman
Zane Grey Theater
Death Valley Days
The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp
Wagon Train


And that's maybe a quarter of the cowboy shows I watched.

I really liked The Rifleman but for a lesson at the end of each episode, nothing compares to The Lone Ranger. Clayton Moore walked the walk.

Down in your heart, you're a sodbuster.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: Blankity Blank
Date: January 11, 2019 08:38PM
Thought The Rifleman was cool because of the one handed spin cock move. I kind of wanted to be Hoss from Bonanza.

I was once playing cowboy (Lone Rangerish) and German (We only had one cowboy get up and a plastic US Army helmet; which turned backwards made you a German. Duh.).

My erstwhile German nemesis reaped the whirlwind when, in a flash of nefarious inspiration, he declared I was out of bullets. Being an experienced cowboy, I short circuited his fiendish logic by doing what every quick thinking cowpoke does when caught embarrassed for ammo.

I threw my gun at him.

Note here, the danger of mixing your game playing universes. Being a filthy sausage eater, he was of course lacking the good old US ingenuity found even in cattle thieving no goods like cowboy bad guys that leads one to duck flying six shooters.

The horn on the hammer of my trusty peacemaker struck him square center of the forehead, producing, briefly, a thin, perfect arc of bright red Gerry juice.

Mothers from four houses down swept aside window blinds hearing the banshee like peal he unleashed. No “Yanni”, no “Laurel”, just a wail that temporarily blinded the poodle next door.

Peanut butter sandwiches all around made the world right again.

The poodle recovered just fine.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/11/2019 08:39PM by Blankity Blank.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: MrNoBody
Date: January 12, 2019 09:48AM
I can't believe in a thread titled I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies,
not one of us mentioned Gunsmoke. Re-runs now on MeTV.

Quote
wikipedia -
The radio series ran from 1952 to 1961. John Dunning wrote that among radio drama enthusiasts, "Gunsmoke is routinely placed among the best shows of any kind and any time." The television series ran for 20 seasons from 1955 to 1975, and lasted for 635 episodes. At the end of its run in 1975, Los Angeles Times columnist Cecil Smith wrote: "Gunsmoke was the dramatization of the American epic legend of the west. Our own Iliad and Odyssey, created from standard elements of the dime novel and the pulp Western as romanticized by [Ned] Buntline, [Bret] Harte, and [Mark] Twain. It was ever the stuff of legend."
banghead smiley



N39° 39.7234', W075° 33.9788'
"I Call Shenanigans!"
-Kyle Broflovski

“If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself.”
-Albert Einstein

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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: January 12, 2019 09:53AM
The genre was 100 years old by the 1950's. Combination of pulps and movies made it a natural for TV.


wikipedia
1850s–1900
The Western as a specialized genre got its start in the "penny dreadfuls" and later the "dime novels". Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel. These cheaply made books were hugely successful and capitalized on the many stories that were being told about the mountain men, outlaws, settlers, and lawmen who were taming the western frontier. Many of these novels were fictionalized stories based on actual people, such as Billy the Kid, Buffalo Bill, Wyatt Earp (who was still alive at the time), Wild Bill Hickok, and Jesse James.

1900s–1930s
By 1900, the new medium of pulp magazines helped to relate these adventures to easterners. Meanwhile, non-American authors, like the German Karl May, picked up the genre, went to full novel length, and made it hugely popular and successful in continental Europe from about 1880 on, though they were generally dismissed as trivial by the literary critics of the day.

Popularity grew with the publication of Owen Wister's novel The Virginian (1902) and especially Zane Grey's Riders of the Purple Sage (1912). The first Hopalong Cassidy stories by Clarence Mulford appeared in 1904, both as dime novels and in pulp magazines. When pulp magazines exploded in popularity in the 1920s, Western fiction greatly benefited (as did the author Max Brand, who excelled at the western short story). Pulp magazines that specialised in Westerns include Cowboy Stories, Ranch Romances, Star Western, West, and Western Story Magazine. The simultaneous popularity of Western movies in the 1920s also helped the genre.
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: January 12, 2019 12:19PM
I can't believe in a thread titled I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies,
not one of us mentioned Gunsmoke. Re-runs now on MeTV.


Indeed.

I thoroughly enjoyed it, especially Amanda Blake. Chester became McCloud and Quint became Dan August and a bunch of others. The story was John Wayne was approached for the role and (maybe not wanting to settle for TV) recommended James Arness.

The one thing that really annoyed me about it, though, was the opening. Matt blinks as he fires. I guess Arness was not a gun guy. That should have been reshot (npi) to get an opening where he doesn't blink, or at least not until after he shoots.

But yes, that was a great show. For awhile, I think it was the longest running show on TV.




When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men
except by believing all possible evil
of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

Perfection is the enemy of progress. -Winston Churchill

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

Mister, that's a ten-gallon hat on a twenty-gallon head.

I *love* Sigs. It's Glocks I hate.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: January 12, 2019 01:06PM
Cheyenne
Sugarfoot
Bronco Lane
The Rebel
Stoney Burke
The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp
Tombstone Territory
The Virginian
Tales of the Texas Rangers
Wanted: Dead or Alive
Colt .45
Batt Masterson
etc, etc. ...

“The movement in westerns, which ABC is credited for having started, represented a fifth of all primetime series on American television in January 1959.”

[en.wikipedia.org]
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Re: I always loved cowboy TV shows and movies.
Posted by: vision63
Date: January 12, 2019 08:14PM
Quote
Blankity Blank
Thought The Rifleman was cool because of the one handed spin cock move. I kind of wanted to be Hoss from Bonanza.

I was once playing cowboy (Lone Rangerish) and German (We only had one cowboy get up and a plastic US Army helmet; which turned backwards made you a German. Duh.).

My erstwhile German nemesis reaped the whirlwind when, in a flash of nefarious inspiration, he declared I was out of bullets. Being an experienced cowboy, I short circuited his fiendish logic by doing what every quick thinking cowpoke does when caught embarrassed for ammo.

I threw my gun at him.

Note here, the danger of mixing your game playing universes. Being a filthy sausage eater, he was of course lacking the good old US ingenuity found even in cattle thieving no goods like cowboy bad guys that leads one to duck flying six shooters.

The horn on the hammer of my trusty peacemaker struck him square center of the forehead, producing, briefly, a thin, perfect arc of bright red Gerry juice.

Mothers from four houses down swept aside window blinds hearing the banshee like peal he unleashed. No “Yanni”, no “Laurel”, just a wail that temporarily blinded the poodle next door.

Peanut butter sandwiches all around made the world right again.

The poodle recovered just fine.

This is excellent!
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