advertisement
Forums

The Forum is sponsored by 
 

AAPL stock: Click Here

You are currently viewing the Tips and Deals forum
Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Drew
Date: January 20, 2019 03:37AM
Seattle Times article:
"Outrageous! Seattle isn’t the best coffee city in the country, says new survey"

[www.seattletimes.com]
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: January 20, 2019 07:52AM
At least they're still home to one of the worst roasted coffee chains in the world.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: stephen
Date: January 20, 2019 08:15AM
When he says citric acid coffee, I wonder if he's talking about third-wave roasters.

Seattle definitely owned the second wave.

Roasters like Intelligentsia, Stumptown, Counter Culture and La Colombe seem to be players in the third-wave.

I like both kinds, depending on when and where I am drinking it.

I actually think lowly supermarket Peet's is a great value when it comes to second-wave. Still love Batdorf & Bronson as well.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Winston
Date: January 20, 2019 08:28AM
Quote
stephen
I actually think lowly supermarket Peet's is a great value when it comes to second-wave. Still love Batdorf & Bronson as well.


thumbs up

Until recently I'd thought Batdorf & Bronson was an Atlanta company, because they are mentioned so regularly by our local NPR station. And great names: Dancing Goats, Whirling Dervish . . .


Recently found a great roaster in Grand Rapids, MI: Schuil Coffee Co.
[schuilcoffee.com]
They are not too far from the Grand Rapids airport. Worth a detour if a trip ever takes you to GR.



Good luck.

- Winston



------------------------
Be seeing you.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: January 20, 2019 09:50AM
Not in the top-ten cities ranked by number of coffee shops per capita.

Is this even a thing to worry about?

They need more coffee shops, regardless of quality?

They need fewer people?



Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: DinerDave
Date: January 20, 2019 10:06AM
There is a difference between best city for coffee, and best coffee.
Just because you have a better business to consumer ratio does not mean that you have great coffee. That just means you have more lazy people that can't make a cup at home, and are willing today $5 for a cup on the run.

My preference is 100% Kona coffee from the big island. I use no sugar and just a light splash of milk, just enough so it is not black. I want my coffee to taste like coffee. 100% Kona is so smooth, I sometime don't even use the splash of milk. Is it expensive? Yes. But being the only coffee drinker in the house, unless a friend is over and I treat them to a cup, the amount I brew at home is worth it to me.

Dave



Welcome to Dave's BBQ!

Many have eaten here....

Few have died
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: January 20, 2019 10:25AM
Quote
stephen
When he says citric acid coffee, I wonder if he's talking about third-wave roasters.

Seattle definitely owned the second wave.

Roasters like Intelligentsia, Stumptown, Counter Culture and La Colombe seem to be players in the third-wave.

I like both kinds, depending on when and where I am drinking it.

I actually think lowly supermarket Peet's is a great value when it comes to second-wave. Still love Batdorf & Bronson as well.

I like Peet's too and but would not call it "lowly supermarket" coffee smiling smiley We coffee lovers owe a debt to Alfred Peet; a Dutchman who saw how terrible American coffee was in the 60s and went about changing that.

It's one of Berkeley's original craft coffee companies.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: MrNoBody
Date: January 20, 2019 10:49AM




39°36'17"N 75°44'43"W

The search engine that doesn't track you.

Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: January 20, 2019 10:59AM
If you're really curious about the Seattle coffee scene, read the book, Starbucked. It's a pretty good timeline of that era.

I find most "American" espresso awful, over extracted, and made with overroasted beans, which is why I make my coffee at home.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: M A V I C
Date: January 20, 2019 11:23AM
I think a better stat would be manual coffee machines per capita. There's plaenty of cities elsewhere that have a cafe or coffee shop with a crappy machine. Around here, every grocery store has a real machine and someone who knows how to use it.

As far as Peet's goes, they also have standalone stores. They're certainly a few steps up from Starbucks.

We have about 10 places to get coffee within a 15 minute walk. All of which are better than the average Paris coffee shop.




Help MacInTouch: Buy from Amazon? use this link [amazon.com]
Mac News & Info: [macintouch.com] [macnn.com] [tuaw.com]
Mac Benchmarks: [barefeats.com]
Used Mac Stuff [FS/T]: LowEndMac Swap List
Mac Software Updates: [macupdate.com]
Fonts: [dafont.com] [fontspace.com]
Online Computer Store With Mac Support: [macsales.com]
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: January 20, 2019 11:36AM
Quote
mrbigstuff
If you're really curious about the Seattle coffee scene, read the book, Starbucked. It's a pretty good timeline of that era.

I find most "American" espresso awful, over extracted, and made with overroasted beans, which is why I make my coffee at home.


The East and West coasts vary in many ways and coffee history and preferences are one of them. The East coast of the US has a much longer history with coffee, including periods of shortages when coffee was cut with chicory and other things that created preferences for lighter, milder, sweeter tastes.

On the West coast a preference for darker roasts emerged as settlers who traveled long distances made it really strong so it would last longer. Then European influences, especially from Italy, brought in craft coffee house culture to places like San Francisco and Seattle and Portland, and that continues now. The preference is still for darker roast and stronger taste than on the East coast.

Starbucks coffee is not "burned," but for people who are used to lighter, milder coffee taste it can seem that way because it is a darker roast.

Like all things; wine, ice cream, oatmeal; have it the way you like it!
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: PizzaGod
Date: January 20, 2019 11:49AM
Quote
Winston
Recently found a great roaster in Grand Rapids, MI: Schuil Coffee Co.
[schuilcoffee.com]
They are not too far from the Grand Rapids airport. Worth a detour if a trip ever takes you to GR.



Good luck.

- Winston

I'm not big on flavored brews, but I think Schuil's are among the best. For what ever that is worth.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: January 20, 2019 01:43PM
Quote
Lemon Drop
Quote
mrbigstuff
If you're really curious about the Seattle coffee scene, read the book, Starbucked. It's a pretty good timeline of that era.

I find most "American" espresso awful, over extracted, and made with overroasted beans, which is why I make my coffee at home.


The East and West coasts vary in many ways and coffee history and preferences are one of them. The East coast of the US has a much longer history with coffee, including periods of shortages when coffee was cut with chicory and other things that created preferences for lighter, milder, sweeter tastes.

On the West coast a preference for darker roasts emerged as settlers who traveled long distances made it really strong so it would last longer. Then European influences, especially from Italy, brought in craft coffee house culture to places like San Francisco and Seattle and Portland, and that continues now. The preference is still for darker roast and stronger taste than on the East coast.

Starbucks coffee is not "burned," but for people who are used to lighter, milder coffee taste it can seem that way because it is a darker roast.

Like all things; wine, ice cream, oatmeal; have it the way you like it!

You should read that book I mentioned, the topics you mention are integral to the theme.

Fwiw, my opinion on the burned taste is exclusive to the making of espresso, not brewed coffee. And the coffee I tried in Seattle suffered the same fate. The best I've had, which still wasn't the espresso one can find at a gas station in Italy, was in NYC.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: hal
Date: January 20, 2019 01:44PM
Who ever thought Seattle was the best coffee city because it's home to Starbucks?

What an absurd idea - Seattle was never #1.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: January 20, 2019 02:29PM
Quote
mrbigstuff
Quote
Lemon Drop
Quote
mrbigstuff
If you're really curious about the Seattle coffee scene, read the book, Starbucked. It's a pretty good timeline of that era.

I find most "American" espresso awful, over extracted, and made with overroasted beans, which is why I make my coffee at home.


The East and West coasts vary in many ways and coffee history and preferences are one of them. The East coast of the US has a much longer history with coffee, including periods of shortages when coffee was cut with chicory and other things that created preferences for lighter, milder, sweeter tastes.

On the West coast a preference for darker roasts emerged as settlers who traveled long distances made it really strong so it would last longer. Then European influences, especially from Italy, brought in craft coffee house culture to places like San Francisco and Seattle and Portland, and that continues now. The preference is still for darker roast and stronger taste than on the East coast.

Starbucks coffee is not "burned," but for people who are used to lighter, milder coffee taste it can seem that way because it is a darker roast.

Like all things; wine, ice cream, oatmeal; have it the way you like it!

You should read that book I mentioned, the topics you mention are integral to the theme.

Fwiw, my opinion on the burned taste is exclusive to the making of espresso, not brewed coffee. And the coffee I tried in Seattle suffered the same fate. The best I've had, which still wasn't the espresso one can find at a gas station in Italy, was in NYC.

I actually have read that and I enjoyed it but I'm confused by your take on it. The book is surprisingly flattering to Starbucks and paints it as a great American success story, despite the title which suggests it's going to be a hit piece.

BTW: I don't get coffee at Starbucks unless there are no other options and I've got to have coffee (this usually happens at airports). I'm not coming at this as a Starbucks booster or customer. I just love really good coffee and I like what I like and I'm instantly skeptical of people who claim they can't find good coffee in a place like Seattle.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: January 20, 2019 03:07PM
Quote
Lemon Drop
Quote
mrbigstuff
Quote
Lemon Drop
Quote
mrbigstuff
If you're really curious about the Seattle coffee scene, read the book, Starbucked. It's a pretty good timeline of that era.

I find most "American" espresso awful, over extracted, and made with overroasted beans, which is why I make my coffee at home.


The East and West coasts vary in many ways and coffee history and preferences are one of them. The East coast of the US has a much longer history with coffee, including periods of shortages when coffee was cut with chicory and other things that created preferences for lighter, milder, sweeter tastes.

On the West coast a preference for darker roasts emerged as settlers who traveled long distances made it really strong so it would last longer. Then European influences, especially from Italy, brought in craft coffee house culture to places like San Francisco and Seattle and Portland, and that continues now. The preference is still for darker roast and stronger taste than on the East coast.

Starbucks coffee is not "burned," but for people who are used to lighter, milder coffee taste it can seem that way because it is a darker roast.

Like all things; wine, ice cream, oatmeal; have it the way you like it!

You should read that book I mentioned, the topics you mention are integral to the theme.

Fwiw, my opinion on the burned taste is exclusive to the making of espresso, not brewed coffee. And the coffee I tried in Seattle suffered the same fate. The best I've had, which still wasn't the espresso one can find at a gas station in Italy, was in NYC.

I actually have read that and I enjoyed it but I'm confused by your take on it. The book is surprisingly flattering to Starbucks and paints it as a great American success story, despite the title which suggests it's going to be a hit piece.

BTW: I don't get coffee at Starbucks unless there are no other options and I've got to have coffee (this usually happens at airports). I'm not coming at this as a Starbucks booster or customer. I just love really good coffee and I like what I like and I'm instantly skeptical of people who claim they can't find good coffee in a place like Seattle.

You're probably skeptical of those people the same way that I'm skeptical of this who think the espresso that is available in 99% of the cafes is even close to the run of the mill stuff one finds in Italy. I guess it's espresso, but it's a lesser imitation. For the record, one can make an excellent coffee (and even espresso) at home with the proper tools, techniques, and coffee.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: January 20, 2019 03:17PM
Quote
mrbigstuff
Quote
Lemon Drop
Quote
mrbigstuff
Quote
Lemon Drop
Quote
mrbigstuff
If you're really curious about the Seattle coffee scene, read the book, Starbucked. It's a pretty good timeline of that era.

I find most "American" espresso awful, over extracted, and made with overroasted beans, which is why I make my coffee at home.


The East and West coasts vary in many ways and coffee history and preferences are one of them. The East coast of the US has a much longer history with coffee, including periods of shortages when coffee was cut with chicory and other things that created preferences for lighter, milder, sweeter tastes.

On the West coast a preference for darker roasts emerged as settlers who traveled long distances made it really strong so it would last longer. Then European influences, especially from Italy, brought in craft coffee house culture to places like San Francisco and Seattle and Portland, and that continues now. The preference is still for darker roast and stronger taste than on the East coast.

Starbucks coffee is not "burned," but for people who are used to lighter, milder coffee taste it can seem that way because it is a darker roast.

Like all things; wine, ice cream, oatmeal; have it the way you like it!

You should read that book I mentioned, the topics you mention are integral to the theme.

Fwiw, my opinion on the burned taste is exclusive to the making of espresso, not brewed coffee. And the coffee I tried in Seattle suffered the same fate. The best I've had, which still wasn't the espresso one can find at a gas station in Italy, was in NYC.

I actually have read that and I enjoyed it but I'm confused by your take on it. The book is surprisingly flattering to Starbucks and paints it as a great American success story, despite the title which suggests it's going to be a hit piece.

BTW: I don't get coffee at Starbucks unless there are no other options and I've got to have coffee (this usually happens at airports). I'm not coming at this as a Starbucks booster or customer. I just love really good coffee and I like what I like and I'm instantly skeptical of people who claim they can't find good coffee in a place like Seattle.

You're probably skeptical of those people the same way that I'm skeptical of this who think the espresso that is available in 99% of the cafes is even close to the run of the mill stuff one finds in Italy. I guess it's espresso, but it's a lesser imitation. For the record, one can make an excellent coffee (and even espresso) at home with the proper tools, techniques, and coffee.

Really? I've never heard of making coffee at home.

Seriously though, I've been to Italy and love the coffee. Love the coffee in Paris, Amsterdam, and Berlin too. Also New York, San Francisco, Asheville, NC, and Lawrence KS too. So much good coffee, so little time.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: dk62
Date: January 20, 2019 03:32PM
I am half-Italian and I grew up in Europe, with a lot of European travel. I was shocked when I came to the US and could not find any espresso anywhere and most coffee was this under-roasted, over-acidic swill. So I am definitely grateful to Starbucks for bringing espresso to most corners of the US. It also helps that I always liked deeply roasted coffee. Now, if they would only stop making those stupid complicated drinks that increase line waiting time for those of us who just want a simple honest espresso.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: January 20, 2019 03:44PM
Quote
dk62
I am half-Italian and I grew up in Europe, with a lot of European travel. I was shocked when I came to the US and could not find any espresso anywhere and most coffee was this under-roasted, over-acidic swill. So I am definitely grateful to Starbucks for bringing espresso to most corners of the US. It also helps that I always liked deeply roasted coffee. Now, if they would only stop making those stupid complicated drinks that increase line waiting time for those of us who just want a simple honest espresso.

Truth.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: January 20, 2019 03:56PM
Peet's Coffee used to be amazing. They lost a bit of quality when they started working to expand from the store in Walnut Square in the mid 80's.



In tha 360. MRF User Map
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Drew
Date: January 20, 2019 04:55PM
Quote
dk62
I am half-Italian and I grew up in Europe, with a lot of European travel. I was shocked when I came to the US and could not find any espresso anywhere and most coffee was this under-roasted, over-acidic swill. So I am definitely grateful to Starbucks for bringing espresso to most corners of the US. It also helps that I always liked deeply roasted coffee. Now, if they would only stop making those stupid complicated drinks that increase line waiting time for those of us who just want a simple honest espresso.

Yes, truth.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: August West
Date: January 20, 2019 06:05PM
I've settled on Peet's major Dickinson 3/2 with a lighter roasted columbian for my everyday drip. Everyone who's had it remarks positively. Espresso doesn't really seem to be a problem, but I have lived in major urban areas my adult life. Meh.



Picasso in his studio after the liberation of Paris, taken by my friend and mentor.

Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: vision63
Date: January 20, 2019 06:34PM
Quote
August West
I've settled on Peet's major Dickinson 3/2 with a lighter roasted columbian for my everyday drip. Everyone who's had it remarks positively. Espresso doesn't really seem to be a problem, but I have lived in major urban areas my adult life. Meh.

So you're blendin' the blend.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: August West
Date: January 20, 2019 07:07PM
Heh, been like that all my life!



Picasso in his studio after the liberation of Paris, taken by my friend and mentor.

Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: January 20, 2019 07:44PM
Quote
August West
I've settled on Peet's major Dickinson 3/2 with a lighter roasted columbian for my everyday drip. Everyone who's had it remarks positively. Espresso doesn't really seem to be a problem, but I have lived in major urban areas my adult life. Meh.

That's also what I use, but I don't cut it. The other excellent coffee sold by Costco is the Rwandan. It's even better, imo, than the Peet's. And you can make an excellent espresso with this. In fact, it's the closest I've found to the Italian coffee taste.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Mike Johnson
Date: January 21, 2019 01:41AM
Here's an interesting article from just last week which isn't so kneejerkingly effusive about Italy's espresso culture [www.washingtonpost.com]

I generally prefer coffee to espresso. At home I drink Peet's Cafe Domingo, though I sometimes treat myself to some Mountain Thunder Kona. But the best coffee I ever had was from Ethiopian beans. While we'd been to a few coffee ceremonies in Ethiopia -- it's a whole big thing where they roast the beans in front of you and it takes forever and even longer if if there's no common language and it's also quite rude to decline an invitation -- it was fine coffee but weird and smoky and they insist on lots of sugar. But while we were there my wife did some volunteering at a convent run by Italian nuns. Fortunately some of the nuns spoke French, so we were able to enjoy a nice afternoon with them before leaving the country. They made some fine coffee in a beautiful ancient Moka pot. I was so appreciative to get some good coffee without the host adding tablespoons of sugar, and we bonded over that.

They gave my wife a bag of freshly roasted beans the day before we left. Normally that's not the greatest thing to bring through customs -- while roasted beans are legal to import, they are highly suspicious -- but the beans smelled fantastic. I'd expected a more ragtag bag of beans, since the best stuff always gets exported, but these were clearly hand picked and sorted, no broken beans, all a uniform size. The roasting was less uniform but that's because they were roasted by hand. So we brought the bag with us, and when I used them in my Aeropress, it really was magnificent coffee.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/21/2019 12:19PM by Mike Johnson.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: dk62
Date: January 21, 2019 07:20AM
Link above just goes to the front page
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: MrNoBody
Date: January 21, 2019 07:34AM
Quote
dk62
Link above just goes to the front page
Mike pasted the article in, no need to use the link (it was for reference?).



39°36'17"N 75°44'43"W

The search engine that doesn't track you.

Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: January 21, 2019 08:21AM
If the link is the one about the hipster coffee bar in Italy that was in the Post recently, it's boneheadedly thin on facts, as if the writer was searching for something to bill his expenses toward.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Mike Johnson
Date: January 21, 2019 12:20PM
No, the article is at [www.washingtonpost.com] sorry about that

edit lol that you’d see my ramblings as something from wapo



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/21/2019 12:23PM by Mike Johnson.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Mike Johnson
Date: January 21, 2019 12:27PM
Quote
mrbigstuff
If the link is the one about the hipster coffee bar in Italy that was in the Post recently, it's boneheadedly thin on facts, as if the writer was searching for something to bill his expenses toward.

Proving the point that it’s taboo to say anything negative about Italy’s coffee culture, whether or not it’s true.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: January 21, 2019 12:50PM
Quote
Mike Johnson
Quote
mrbigstuff
If the link is the one about the hipster coffee bar in Italy that was in the Post recently, it's boneheadedly thin on facts, as if the writer was searching for something to bill his expenses toward.

Proving the point that it’s taboo to say anything negative about Italy’s coffee culture, whether or not it’s true.

That makes no sense. Read the comments on that article, for an additional viewpoint.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: richorlin
Date: January 21, 2019 06:38PM
Call me a snob, but I like Kirkland Colombian coffee in the three pound can. Can’t beat 3 lbs for $9.



richorlin

[DrawingMyLife.com]

[www.dudeism.com]
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: vision63
Date: January 21, 2019 10:19PM
Quote
richorlin
Call me a snob, but I like Kirkland Colombian coffee in the three pound can. Can’t beat 3 lbs for $9.

It's good stuff
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Sam3
Date: January 22, 2019 05:46AM
Per doctors orders, I can't drink caffeinated coffee. I've had the hardest time finding a decaf that doesn't taste like chemicals or soury acidic, so I've landed on Starbucks as my regular brand. I like the "burnt" darker roast coffees, they have a fuller taste in my book, without the citrusy acidity of a lighter roast. The Starbucks Cafe Verona decaf is usually my daily driver, it has a certain sweetness that their other decafs don't have. My backup brand is Peet's, they have a couple of decafs that are nice.

I need to try Schuil's again, their grocery market blends are just flavored, or "breakfast", neither of which I care for. However, looking at their website, it shows that they have quite a variety of decafs. I may have to stop by their location.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: January 22, 2019 10:13AM
Love Starbucks Verona, that was my go to years ago before I switched to trying local small batch roasters (although Starbucks is roasted locally too).

Comment on my neighborhood FB page this morning:

Morning! Is there anywhere to buy flavored coffee beans? Or is that just a New York thing? lol

Most favored response:
This question pains me so.

Answer - you can buy it everywhere but it's not the prevailing local preference...
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Say it ain't so! Seattle not #1 for coffee?
Posted by: vision63
Date: January 22, 2019 12:42PM
Quote
Lemon Drop
Love Starbucks Verona, that was my go to years ago before I switched to trying local small batch roasters (although Starbucks is roasted locally too).

Comment on my neighborhood FB page this morning:

Morning! Is there anywhere to buy flavored coffee beans? Or is that just a New York thing? lol

Most favored response:
This question pains me so.

Answer - you can buy it everywhere but it's not the prevailing local preference...

Cafe Verona is my Starbucks favorite. There is a spot in San Leandro which is just south of Oakland where you can smell coffee being roasted by Peet's sent by the wind from their roasting facility in nearby Alameda combined with chocolate being made at the Ghirardelli Chocolate factory there in San Leandro. Roasting smells different than "roasted." I do like the phenomena when it occurs. Ghirardelli has a factory store there.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login

Online Users

Guests: 156
Record Number of Users: 186 on February 20, 2020
Record Number of Guests: 2330 on October 25, 2018