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A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: June 28, 2019 01:49PM
Guilty verdict today for Bill Tabott, age 56, in Everett WA for the 1987 murders of a young couple.

"They were found brutally murdered, their bodies dumped in Snohomish and Skagit counties. This was not just a sordid murder case.
This was the first time a suspect found using genetic genealogy has been put on trial.

After the Golden State Killer was nabbed last year, Washington state law officials saw an opportunity. They uploaded the DNA profile of the mysterious man, dubbed “Individual A,” into a genetic database.

Two second cousins popped up, a genetic genealogist perused his family tree, and within days, Bill Talbott of Monroe, Washington, became suspect number 1."


[kuow.org]

In depth story on the case:
[www.kuow.org]
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: June 28, 2019 01:51PM
Genetic genealogy? Is that akin to a decisive decision?



It is what it is.
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: June 28, 2019 01:57PM
On a more serious note: This is a good example of why I will never submit to testing by 23andMe or its ilk -- when combined with the storage of genealogy information about one's family in the, they represent a profound loss of privacy and anonymity.



It is what it is.
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: rjmacs
Date: June 28, 2019 02:56PM
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
On a more serious note: This is a good example of why I will never submit to testing by 23andMe or its ilk -- when combined with the storage of genealogy information about one's family in the, they represent a profound loss of privacy and anonymity.

It's not you you have to worry about - it's all your relatives making it easier to triangulate in on your DNA!!!

Edit: this is where the genealogy part matters. They don't need YOUR genetic material to figure out who you are. Once they're 'in the genetic neighborhood,' they just use logic and process of elimination combined with genealogical records to figure out who the mystery sample-provider is!



rj
AKA
Vreemac, Moth of the Future




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/28/2019 02:57PM by rjmacs.
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: Ombligo
Date: June 28, 2019 03:03PM
This was for a cold case double murder and it may be easy to say that the creep deserved to be caught. But now that it was successful, do you think this crime-solving tool will be limited to such extreme cases?

It could easily become a factor in any case that has DNA evidence.



“No persons are more frequently wrong, than those who will not admit they are wrong.”
-- François de La Rochefoucauld

"WE CALL BS!" -- Emma Gonzalez
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: testcase
Date: June 28, 2019 03:37PM
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
On a more serious note: This is a good example of why I will never submit to testing by 23andMe or its ilk -- when combined with the storage of genealogy information about one's family in the, they represent a profound loss of privacy and anonymity.


I worked for city, county and state governments for well over 30 years. There is ALWAYS someone in a position of power who knows that they're right, even (especially?) when they're not.


It's just a matter of time before some over aggressive government minion will access stored DNA and plant same to frame help convict someone who should NOT have been convicted. Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely. old fogey smiley
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: June 28, 2019 03:42PM
I'm on the fence, though it really doesn't matter.

I would never submit my DNA to the odd genealogy website.

But my DNA is already a matter of record (job record, not criminal record) so I ether can't commit criminal acts or better be very careful.

That said, have no problem with law enforcement winnowing the suspect field with DNA Triangulation.

Huh. A new acronym – DNAT.




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all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

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by believing all possible evil of evil men.

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And hope is a lousy defense.

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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: June 28, 2019 04:10PM
I'm glad to see Mr. Talbott headed to jail for the remainder of his life. Ultimately it wasn't his cousins who did him in, it was littering. Even though the genetic database led to him as the prime suspect, a detective still had to trail him until they could get a DNA sample to confirm a match with the evidence from the murders.

He finally threw a cup out his truck window, and the detective picked it up.
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: Janit
Date: June 29, 2019 07:37AM
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Genetic genealogy? Is that akin to a decisive decision?

Nope. Classic genealogy relies on written records and oral histories. Genetic genealogy adds DNA biochemistry into the mix.
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: MrNoBody
Date: June 29, 2019 08:25AM
Quote
testcase
...
I worked for city, county and state governments for well over 30 years. There is ALWAYS someone in a position of power who knows that they're right, even (especially?) when they're not.

It's just a matter of time before some over aggressive government minion will access stored DNA and plant same to frame help convict someone who should NOT have been convicted. Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely. old fogey smiley

Exhibit #1: Mike Nifong
'nuff said



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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: C(-)ris
Date: June 29, 2019 01:34PM
Quote
Lemon Drop
I'm glad to see Mr. Talbott headed to jail for the remainder of his life. Ultimately it wasn't his cousins who did him in, it was littering. Even though the genetic database led to him as the prime suspect, a detective still had to trail him until they could get a DNA sample to confirm a match with the evidence from the murders.

He finally threw a cup out his truck window, and the detective picked it up.

Unless you burn all your trash, never venture outside, and keep everything it would probably take them all of 4 hours to get a DNA sample from anyone. The only reason they don't just show up with a warrant is that they want the element of surprise so you don't flee. DNA testing takes time, they can't show their cards or the guilty party could be in Mexico before the test is done.



C(-)ris
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Re: A first: Genetic genealogy used to convict a killer, resolve 1987 double murder
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: June 30, 2019 11:01AM
At least one of the genetic database organizations has changed its policy about giving law enforcement unfettered access to the information. Florida-based GEDmatch has changed to an "opt in" policy and now its users can restrict law enforcement access to their DNA data.

If others follow suit this avenue for solving cold cases may be limited significantly.
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