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What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: 3d
Date: August 01, 2019 11:45AM
What's the difference between these two nuts?
As far as I can tell, the nut is to hold the pin snug up against the receiver so it doesn't rattle. But why include 2 different looking nuts? Do the 2 nuts work differently? For different situations?

The product is a Stainless Steel Trailer Hitch Pin
[www.amazon.com]

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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: Forrest
Date: August 01, 2019 12:00PM
The nut with the black insert is a self locking nut. I would use install the self locking nut and keep the other nut/clip as a spare
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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: michaelb
Date: August 01, 2019 12:06PM
I would use the nonlocking one if you plan to pull the hitch on and off periodically, and the locking one if you never plan to remove it.
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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: 3d
Date: August 01, 2019 12:19PM
Ahhh... thanks guys. I was more focused on the shape of the nut. And didn't notice the inside threads were different. I like that there's also a cotter pin as a last resort safety in case the nut gets loosened on the road when in use.
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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: August 01, 2019 12:50PM
Not to put two fine of a point on it, the lock nut has a nylon or similar insert to capture the threads, once one puts a few turns on it.

I agree- if you seldom remove that nut, use the lock nut. You'll need a wrench or socket to remove it up until the very last few turns.

The non-lock nut will spin freely once you break it loose.




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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: August 01, 2019 01:02PM
Sometimes it feels like a nut, sometimes it don't?
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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: deckeda
Date: August 01, 2019 02:14PM
In my experience, the receiver will bounce around inside the hitch regardless, because there's a greater gap area throughout that than there is where the pin goes through it at the end.

I can see how a bolt/nut that's snug might mitigate that somewhat however.

The biggest advantage to this setup is likely that it would deter a quick theft (whereas a keyed lock pin would be even more secure.)

Out here in the sticks, any kind is "secure," because everybody already has a receiver on their hitch. The only one I had stolen was in a suburban/urban area.
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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: 3d
Date: August 01, 2019 02:45PM
Quote
deckeda
The biggest advantage to this setup is likely that it would deter a quick theft (whereas a keyed lock pin would be even more secure.)

Heh, you pretty much guessed it smiling smiley 2-3 times a month I use a hitch mounted bike rack so the kids can take their bikes out to the park or beach. For that I use a keyed lock pin. For the other 350 days of the year there's a friction rubber cap on the receiver. This hitch pin is a small deterrent for that random loser walking by who might want to steal the rubber cap out of boredom.
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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: August 01, 2019 02:57PM
I need to see the bottom of the nut with the flared base. Sometimes they will have a toothed texture designed to be sort of a lock washer. Those are usually torqued down to a set rating or maybe a quarter to half turn after it starts to get tight.



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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: Golfer
Date: August 01, 2019 04:45PM
The flared nut is called a flange nut.

"A flange nut is a nut that has a wide flange at one end that acts as an integrated washer. This serves to distribute the pressure of the nut over the part being secured, reducing the chance of damage to the part and making it less likely to loosen as a result of an uneven fastening surface."
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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: August 01, 2019 06:07PM
I love this forum.

LOL, that cracked me up.

I'm leaning more towards ambivalence.




When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men except
by believing all possible evil of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

Perfection is the enemy of progress. -Winston Churchill

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

Mister, that's a ten-gallon hat on a twenty-gallon head.

I *love* SIGs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: What's the difference between these two nuts?
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: August 03, 2019 02:20AM
....the same...both have been fondled......



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