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7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: Zoidberg
Date: January 28, 2020 02:12PM
Follow here: [www.independent.co.uk]



It's spelled " y'all "

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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: Ombligo
Date: January 28, 2020 03:20PM
So far no reports of death or severe damage. The quake was 10 mile deep and 75 miles off the coast. Lets hope the remains true



“No persons are more frequently wrong, than those who will not admit they are wrong.”
-- François de La Rochefoucauld

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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: timg
Date: January 28, 2020 03:54PM
How is it affecting the SuperBowl? That's all we really care about. smiling smiley



Skill without imagination is craftsmanship. Imagination without skill is Modern Art.
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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: pdq
Date: January 28, 2020 03:57PM
That’s a BIG quake.
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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: 3d
Date: January 28, 2020 04:02PM
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timg
How is it affecting the SuperBowl? That's all we really care about. smiling smiley

How dare you! Go Chiefs.
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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: timg
Date: January 28, 2020 04:13PM
Quote
3d
Quote
timg
How is it affecting the SuperBowl? That's all we really care about. smiling smiley

How dare you! Go Chiefs.

Sorry to inform you, but the earthquake probably gives San Francisco home field advantage...



Skill without imagination is craftsmanship. Imagination without skill is Modern Art.
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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: steve...
Date: January 28, 2020 04:19PM
That was a BIG one! Midway between Jamaica and Cuba.

USGS




Northern California Coast
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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: 3d
Date: January 28, 2020 04:20PM
Quote
timg
Quote
3d
Quote
timg
How is it affecting the SuperBowl? That's all we really care about. smiling smiley

How dare you! Go Chiefs.

Sorry to inform you, but the earthquake probably gives San Francisco home field advantage...

And with that perfect LOL comment, I am now officially rooting for SanFran and Jimmy Garofalo.
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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: Paul F.
Date: January 28, 2020 04:34PM
Man, I'll bet that sucked a lot worse for Grand Cayman than for Jamaica or Cuba!

Best wishes to the Islands down yonder... a 7-point-anything is decidedly unpleasant!



Paul F.
-----
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca c. 5 BC - 65 AD
----
Good is the enemy of Excellent. Talent is not necessary for Excellence.
Persistence is necessary for Excellence. And Persistence is a Decision.

--

--

--
Eureka, CA
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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: gabester
Date: January 28, 2020 09:27PM
Personally, I hope Joe Montana's team wins the Super Bowl...

But I'm more curious about this recent proliferation of significant earthquakes in the Caribbean lately. Is there any consensus on why the region seems to have become much more active? When was the last time they had so many similar magnitude quakes so close together? Fortunately overall fatalities don't seem to be terribly high, but it's tragic nonetheless.
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Re: 7.7 magnitude earthquake rocks Jamaica; buildings in Miami evacuated
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: January 28, 2020 09:41PM
Quote
gabester
Personally, I hope Joe Montana's team wins the Super Bowl...

But I'm more curious about this recent proliferation of significant earthquakes in the Caribbean lately. Is there any consensus on why the region seems to have become much more active? When was the last time they had so many similar magnitude quakes so close together? Fortunately overall fatalities don't seem to be terribly high, but it's tragic nonetheless.

[www.usgs.gov]

In the 20th century alone there have been several very large earthquakes north of Puerto Rico (Ms 7.3 in 1918; Ms 7.8 in 1943; Ms 8.0 in 1946 and four major aftershocks of Ms 7.6, 7.0, 7.3, 7.1 between 1946 and 1953). Large tsunamis have also hit Puerto Rico and Hispaniola, reportedly killing 1800 people in 1946 and 40 people in 1918. Images of the slope north of Puerto Rico disclose massive slope failure scars, as much as 50 km across, that probably generated tsunamis along the north shore of the island. Other margins of the island (west, south, and south west) are also associated with massive tectonic features and may pose addtional hazard.

...Historically, other large earthquakes have also struck the area, such as one in 1787 (magnitude~8.1), possibly in the Puerto Rico Trench, and one in 1867 (magnitude~7.5) between St. Thomas ad St. Croix in the Anegada Trough. A draft U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hazard map places equal probability for damaging ground motion for Mayaguez in western Puerto Rico as for Seattle, Washington. Other Puerto Rican cities also have substantial risk.

The hazard from tsunamis is also apparent. Immediately after the 1946 earthquake, a tsunami struck northeastern Hispaniola and moved inland for several kilometers. Some reports indicate that nearly 1,800 people drowned. A 1918 magnitude 7.5 earthquake resulted in a tsunami that killed at least 40 people in northwestern Puerto Rico. Eyewitness reports of an 1867 Virgin Islands tsunami gave a maximum wave height of >7 m in Frederiksted, St. Croix, where a large naval vessel was left on top of a pier. Essentially, all of the known causes of tsunamis are present in the Caribbean -- earthquakes, submarine landslides, submarine volcanic eruptions, subaerial pyroclastic flows into the ocean, and major tsunamis called teletsunamis. Because of its high population density and extensive development near the coast, Puerto Rico has a significant risk for earthquakes and tsunamis.




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