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Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: PeterB
Date: March 17, 2020 02:29PM
Referenced in the NY Times article in freeradical's post below, ferrets can be a model for SARS-CoV-2...

[www.statnews.com]

... but to my great interest and surprise, guess which species has been studied to suffer lung pathology from SARS, yet NOT show any clinical symptoms, AND develop antibodies to fight off the virus and prevent reinfection...?

[www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

emoticon-animal-022 hamster dance emoticon-animal-022 hamster dance emoticon-animal-022 hamster dance emoticon-animal-022 hamster dance emoticon-animal-022 hamster dance




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: neophyte
Date: March 17, 2020 02:36PM
We used that species for a lot of our carcinogenesis studies 20 years ago. They are hard to hold onto (no tail), and quick to bite your hand. And first-time mothers often cannibalize their neonates.

But, yeah, they look cute.
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: rjmacs
Date: March 17, 2020 02:59PM
woot smiley



rj
AKA
Vreemac, Moth of the Future
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: PeterB
Date: March 17, 2020 03:01PM
Quote
neophyte
We used that species for a lot of our carcinogenesis studies 20 years ago. They are hard to hold onto (no tail), and quick to bite your hand. And first-time mothers often cannibalize their neonates.

But, yeah, they look cute.

Neo, you must be really new here (as your name suggests), or else you'd know ... I have a LOT of experience with this particular species. STF and you'll see... grinning smiley

As for being hard to hold onto, mine don't want to leave my hand (they want to play), I haven't been bitten for about 10 years now (and when I was bitten, it was from a pet store animal, not one of my own).

And as for the first-time mothers and their neonates: my experience with that has been that that really only happens if there is something genetically "wrong" with a pup, or if the mother is disturbed by human beings wanting to have a look. smiling smiley ... also it's very important for the mom to get sufficient protein for the milk for the pups, so I usually give her a bit extra in the way of vegetable or animal protein, e.g., almonds, milk-soaked bread, beans/legumes, or soy product (TSP or TVP).




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: SDGuy
Date: March 17, 2020 04:29PM
Thought for sure this was going to be about an alternative transportation choice, for when things start to get serious at the grocery store...

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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: March 17, 2020 04:40PM
Quote
SDGuy
Thought for sure this was going to be about an alternative transportation choice, for when things start to get serious at the grocery store...


There's one not too far from me, but unfortunately I don't think it's for sale.
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: neophyte
Date: March 17, 2020 05:03PM
Quote
PeterB
Quote
neophyte
We used that species for a lot of our carcinogenesis studies 20 years ago. They are hard to hold onto (no tail), and quick to bite your hand. And first-time mothers often cannibalize their neonates.

But, yeah, they look cute.

Neo, you must be really new here (as your name suggests), or else you'd know ... I have a LOT of experience with this particular species. STF and you'll see... grinning smiley

As for being hard to hold onto, mine don't want to leave my hand (they want to play), I haven't been bitten for about 10 years now (and when I was bitten, it was from a pet store animal, not one of my own).

And as for the first-time mothers and their neonates: my experience with that has been that that really only happens if there is something genetically "wrong" with a pup, or if the mother is disturbed by human beings wanting to have a look. smiling smiley ... also it's very important for the mom to get sufficient protein for the milk for the pups, so I usually give her a bit extra in the way of vegetable or animal protein, e.g., almonds, milk-soaked bread, beans/legumes, or soy product (TSP or TVP).

I have been around for quite a while, was on Dealmac too, but I admit not following your posts on these critters.

Research Syrian Hamsters were derived from only 6 animals, caught in the wild in the 1930s (or 40s?) and so are somewhat inbred. They are treated differently than pets: they are housed in cages without any distractions, just bedding, and are daily picked up and moved to new cages with fresh bedding. Then they are picked up and examined, palpated, and sometimes given an injection. The food is just standard pellet chow.

It's no surprise they seem meaner than your average pet. Mice and rats I had used in research were almost as disgruntled, but you can hold them securely with one hand by the scruff of the neck and hold their tail with your pinky. Syrian Hamsters are very agile when held by the scruff, and can twist around easily to bite because they have no tail you can hold.
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: Racer X
Date: March 17, 2020 05:46PM
Quote
macphanatic
Quote
SDGuy
Thought for sure this was going to be about an alternative transportation choice, for when things start to get serious at the grocery store...


There's one not too far from me, but unfortunately I don't think it's for sale.

at least not right now.
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: March 17, 2020 08:13PM
PeterB, have you seen the NOVA episode "Dog Tales" Season 47 Episode 2? Do you think your especially friendly critters might have a similar genetic change?



In tha 360. MRF User Map
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: March 17, 2020 09:45PM
i hear it's better when they can exercise



ferrets wheel
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Re: Forget the ferrets, consider using these instead
Posted by: PeterB
Date: March 17, 2020 11:04PM
Quote
neophyte
Quote
PeterB
Quote
neophyte
We used that species for a lot of our carcinogenesis studies 20 years ago. They are hard to hold onto (no tail), and quick to bite your hand. And first-time mothers often cannibalize their neonates.

But, yeah, they look cute.

Neo, you must be really new here (as your name suggests), or else you'd know ... I have a LOT of experience with this particular species. STF and you'll see... grinning smiley

As for being hard to hold onto, mine don't want to leave my hand (they want to play), I haven't been bitten for about 10 years now (and when I was bitten, it was from a pet store animal, not one of my own).

And as for the first-time mothers and their neonates: my experience with that has been that that really only happens if there is something genetically "wrong" with a pup, or if the mother is disturbed by human beings wanting to have a look. smiling smiley ... also it's very important for the mom to get sufficient protein for the milk for the pups, so I usually give her a bit extra in the way of vegetable or animal protein, e.g., almonds, milk-soaked bread, beans/legumes, or soy product (TSP or TVP).

I have been around for quite a while, was on Dealmac too, but I admit not following your posts on these critters.

Research Syrian Hamsters were derived from only 6 animals, caught in the wild in the 1930s (or 40s?) and so are somewhat inbred. They are treated differently than pets: they are housed in cages without any distractions, just bedding, and are daily picked up and moved to new cages with fresh bedding. Then they are picked up and examined, palpated, and sometimes given an injection. The food is just standard pellet chow.

It's no surprise they seem meaner than your average pet. Mice and rats I had used in research were almost as disgruntled, but you can hold them securely with one hand by the scruff of the neck and hold their tail with your pinky. Syrian Hamsters are very agile when held by the scruff, and can twist around easily to bite because they have no tail you can hold.

Actually, the research and pet animals are ALL derived from those six or so animals from Israel Aharoni, caught in Aleppo. So pretty much everything right now is massively inbred... I read that there were later collections of wild-caught animals in the 1980's and again in the 2000's, but not sure what happened to them (did they make it into the pet trade?). ... and I'm sure that if that's what's being done with them in research environments, that no, they aren't going to be particularly friendly... they need to be properly socialized by caring human beings. And yes, I'm well aware that they can twist and bite. Mine don't. grinning smiley

Quote
Filliam H. Muffman
PeterB, have you seen the NOVA episode "Dog Tales" Season 47 Episode 2? Do you think your especially friendly critters might have a similar genetic change?

I haven't ... I'll add it to my watch list. But I can guess what it's about, and indeed I suspect that my breeding program has resulted in mutations that affect behavior... for example, I'm sure that I've (indirectly) caused or selected for mutations in things like serotonin or dopamine receptors... by consistently breeding for friendlier animals, I'm probably selecting for natural variants.




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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