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Cost of Adding AC/HEat to existing 1952 Built Home in Southern Cal
Posted by: Microman
Date: March 31, 2020 11:00AM
Guy wants to put a Goodman with a seer rating of 14. House has no ducts, it has a floor heater. So we would get a heater and AC... price quoted is in the $6800 range.

Contractor that is doing the roof extension , I suppose will repair the spot where they take out the old floor heater.

We pay for permit from city, and for that test for efficiency....

Anything else I should be think..
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Re: Cost of Adding AC/HEat to existing 1952 Built Home in Southern Cal
Posted by: Ombligo
Date: March 31, 2020 11:54AM
Have you considered a split system or dual zone? No ductwork needed. They can be quite a bit cheaper to install retroactively and are also efficient since you can just the cool/heat the area you need instead of the who house.



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Re: Cost of Adding AC/HEat to existing 1952 Built Home in Southern Cal
Posted by: MikeF
Date: March 31, 2020 11:59AM
Single storey? Unit/ducting in attic? Ceiling vents? Return? Split A/C system?

Think about where you want the vents in all the rooms (don't leave it for chance). The return should be in a central location so the air flows from all the rooms to it. Make sure the return uses a standard size filter so you can get it anywhere. Make sure your attic access point is large enough should the unit ever need to be replaced. Heater will require roof penetration for exhaust; think about where you want that as well. Will require dedicated power outlet in attic and circuit breaker. The outside A/C unit will also require a dedicated power outlet and breaker. May require a separate concrete pad. If it's conventional A/C system (compressor outside), there will be refrigerant lines that need to be run. Think about where you want them, also. Basically, think about every single piece of the system and decide ahead of time where you want things.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/31/2020 12:01PM by MikeF.
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Re: Cost of Adding AC/HEat to existing 1952 Built Home in Southern Cal
Posted by: Gareth
Date: March 31, 2020 01:31PM
Quote
MikeF
Make sure your attic access point is large enough should the unit ever need to be replaced.

Yup. My contractor and his AC guy effed me on the AC install. Cost me extra thousands and many months in permit delays, and now I have a pointless skylight in the roof that is the "attic access" for the furnace.

In retrospect, had I known ahead of time, I would have gone with a combo unit on the roof (furnace/AC) and then the only thing in the attic would be the ducting. It's what I ended up replacing one of the units with as part of the solution (I have a duplex, so 2 systems). I didn't know combo units existed and nobody thought to mention it as a possibility upfront.
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Re: Cost of Adding AC/HEat to existing 1952 Built Home in Southern Cal
Posted by: AllGold
Date: March 31, 2020 02:26PM
I'm not sure what a floor heater is.



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Re: Cost of Adding AC/HEat to existing 1952 Built Home in Southern Cal
Posted by: Gareth
Date: March 31, 2020 04:29PM
Quote
AllGold
I'm not sure what a floor heater is.

Like a wall heater (in function, a standalone gas furnace), but under the floor with a large grate (i.e. 1.5'-2' x 2'-3'). Pretty common in older SoCal houses to have just 1 for the whole house.
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Re: Cost of Adding AC/HEat to existing 1952 Built Home in Southern Cal
Posted by: Thrift Store Scott
Date: March 31, 2020 05:00PM
Quote
Gareth
Quote
AllGold
I'm not sure what a floor heater is.

Like a wall heater (in function, a standalone gas furnace), but under the floor with a large grate (i.e. 1.5'-2' x 2'-3'). Pretty common in older SoCal houses to have just 1 for the whole house.

Ahhh! Down here we call that a "floor furnace". They are, or were, extremely common in the kit houses built around here in the teens and twenties. They're reasonably efficient at heating a small house, too, as long as the doors to each room from the hall stay open. While they may not get heat to every corner of every room in the house as forced air heating does, they do provide a place to stand and get warm when you've just come in from the cold, a feature that forced air systems lack.

I thought those were strictly a Southern thing because any time I've mentioned them or tried to describe one to someone from another part of the US I've only been met with uncomprehending blank stares.

If the OP has a floor furnace, then his house is probably equipped with a decent-sized crawl space as well which would make installation of a forced air HVAC system much easier.



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