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Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: July 22, 2020 02:10PM
So, the internet informs us that
:While dances held in stocking feet were known back to the early 40's (USO and Red Cross sponsored dances in smaller towns without dancehalls used local gymnasiums) - the term "hop" to describe a dance didn't come around until 1952 with the song "Bunny Hop".

wrong wrong wrong

This is the opening of the O Henry short story "The coming Out of Maggie" seen in a collection O. Henry, The Four Million published in 1906
Here's the full short story (plus a 14 minute audio version)=>
[etc.usf.edu]

Every Saturday night the Clover Leaf Social Club gave a hop in the hall of the Give and Take Athletic Association on the East Side. In order to attend one of these dances you must be a member of the Give and Take—or, if you belong to the division that starts off with the right foot in waltzing, you must work in Rhinegold's paper–box factory. Still, any Clover Leaf was privileged to escort or be escorted by an outsider to a single dance. But mostly each Give and Take brought the paper–box girl that he affected; and few strangers could boast of having shaken a foot at the regular hops.

Maggie Toole, on account of her dull eyes, broad mouth and left–handed style of footwork in the two–step, went to the dances with Anna McCarty and her "fellow." Anna and Maggie worked side by side in the factory, and were the greatest chums ever. So Anna always made Jimmy Burns take her by Maggie's house every Saturday night so that her friend could go to the dance with them.

The Give and Take Athletic Association lived up to its name. The hall of the association in Orchard street was fitted out with muscle–making inventions. With the fibres thus builded up the members were wont to engage the police and rival social and athletic organisations in joyous combat. Between these more serious occupations the Saturday night hop with the paper–box factory girls came as a refining influence and as an efficient screen. For sometimes the tip went 'round, and if you were among the elect that tiptoed up the dark back stairway you might see as neat and satisfying a little welter–weight affair to a finish as ever happened inside the ropes.

as usual an entertaining O Henry story- give the linked version a try on a quarantined afternoon.
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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: testcase
Date: July 22, 2020 03:25PM
Did Anna "come out" with Maggie?
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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: July 22, 2020 03:36PM
Quote
testcase
Did Anna "come out" with Maggie?
read the story
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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: July 22, 2020 08:25PM
Well someplace on the Internet may claim that, but there's lots more to show it's wrong.

"Hop 'a small jump, a leap on one foot,' c. 1500, from hop (v.). Slang sense of 'informal dancing party' is from 1731 (defined by Johnson as 'a place where meaner people dance'). "




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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: Rolando
Date: July 22, 2020 08:36PM
I recall my mother told me about going to sock hops in the 50's. They danced in socks to avoid scratching and scuffing the Gym floor.



San Antonio, TX (in the old city)


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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: July 22, 2020 10:53PM
Quote
DeusxMac
Well someplace on the Internet may claim that, but there's lots more to show it's wrong.

"Hop 'a small jump, a leap on one foot,' c. 1500, from hop (v.). Slang sense of 'informal dancing party' is from 1731 (defined by Johnson as 'a place where meaner people dance'). "

that's great! Thanks.
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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: RgrF
Date: July 22, 2020 11:02PM
When or wherever it originated, it came into the American music lexicon during the 1950s.
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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: Racer X
Date: July 23, 2020 12:51AM
Any idea where "At The Jump!" Came from? Late 1800s to early 1900s meant in a hurry, don't waste time. Origin?



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The police have no duty to respond. See Castle Rock v. Gonzales, 545 U.S. 748 (2005) or Warren v. District of Columbia[1] (444 A.2d. 1, D.C. Ct. of Ap. 1981)
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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: RgrF
Date: July 23, 2020 01:29AM
Quote
Racer X
Any idea where "At The Jump!" Came from? Late 1800s to early 1900s meant in a hurry, don't waste time. Origin?

First date?
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Re: Language: 'at the hop'
Posted by: btfc
Date: July 23, 2020 12:26PM
Hopheads!
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