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A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Greg
Date: May 26, 2009 09:23PM
[gallery.me.com]

A thousand words, and all that.

Thanks for your time!
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: BillMac
Date: May 26, 2009 09:30PM
Seems to make sense to me. Install a trap on the left side, run it over to the right, intersect with a "T", and let it go out the lower drain. I'm not sure, and I'm not an expert (by ANY stretch of the word!), but does that seem too simple?

People with more experience? Help?



-Bill
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Jack D.
Date: May 26, 2009 09:31PM
You could do that but the left side sink drain should be level with and at a 90 to the accordion tube going to the wall drain. It looks like the PVC coming from the bottom of the sink drain is too long if I'm seeing this right. Just cut some off the long straight tube, attach to the accordion section and you should be good to go.



- Jack D.




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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Black
Date: May 26, 2009 09:52PM
Quote
Jack D.
You could do that but the left side sink drain should be level with and at a 90 to the accordion tube going to the wall drain. It looks like the PVC coming from the bottom of the sink drain is too long if I'm seeing this right. Just cut some off the long straight tube, attach to the accordion section and you should be good to go.

The flex section effectively forms the p-trap. Cut the downpipe and you'll lose your trap.
There's no reason you shouldn't be able to get it tightly sealed in its current configuration, weird as it is. Are you using new washers? Are all the connectors well-aligned, rather than tightened down while slightly crooked? There's no sealant or silicone anywhere in the setup, is there?
Ghetto plumbing trick-- once you've got it all together as best you can, wind mass-quantities of teflon tape around the -outside- of the joints.




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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: May 26, 2009 09:54PM
It is a good idea to have the disposer and other drain separate like has been done. Otherwise when you turn on the disposer, it can blow stuff back up the drain of the other sink. My guess is there is a local code regulation for this.

Not a plumber.



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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: mattkime
Date: May 26, 2009 10:10PM
>>My guess is there is a local code regulation for this.

Yes, thats what i thought when i saw the flexitube. i know that stuff isn't up to code here. i'm all for diy but it might be worthwhile to call a plumber and watch them fix this in less time than we've spend discussing it.



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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Racer X
Date: May 26, 2009 10:18PM
just my 2 cents. Those flex pipes as part of the trap trap all sorts of crap, and can start to smell. Especially if the P-trap dries out during a long trip, or if you don't use that side of the sink for a while. I have to take mine off about twice a year and brush it out and soak in bleach water to kill the funk.
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Ken Sp.
Date: May 26, 2009 10:19PM
Quote
Filliam H. Muffman
It is a good idea to have the disposer and other drain separate like has been done. Otherwise when you turn on the disposer, it can blow stuff back up the drain of the other sink. My guess is there is a local code regulation for this.

Not a plumber.

There are T or Y fittings that have a fixed deflector inside to prevent this--and are very common.

I would run it like this
[www.nettally.com]

You would modify it a bit.

Those flex pipes should not be used and a P-trap for at least 2 reasons.
1. The corrugation creates a great place for gunk to start building up.
2. The flex creates lateral pressure on the joint nearby and likes to distort do that it leaks at the joint.


If you cannot get it all sealed-you can use silicone caulk in the joint--but that is last resort, since it it difficult to work with later if you have to take it apart.
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Ken Sp.
Date: May 26, 2009 10:21PM
This cleanable P-Trap looks interesting

[www.pfwaterworks.net]
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: May 26, 2009 10:24PM
The problem with flex tube is that stuff collects in the corrugations over time. There's no reason the layout can't be replaced with non-flex pipe with a little cutting and gluing of pvc. Get a P trap set up from home depot or lowes, plus some pvc that is the same diameter as the existing drain line, an elbow (90 degree), a 45 or two, and a coupler plus pvc cleaner and glue. Cut the pvc with a saw. Use a knife, sandpaper, etc to remove the rough edges and burrs. This is really import for the pipes going into the P-trap so that they don't nick the washer that provides the water tight seal. Put the P trap on the tail pipe (pipe down from the sink -you may need to shorten the drain pipe so that the P trap discharge is in line with the drain pipe. Then play around with the angles to get it to line up.
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Greg
Date: May 26, 2009 11:44PM
Thanks, everyone.

That this isn't up to code wouldn't be surprising, as it was cobbled together by yours truly.

I think I'll try cutting that pipe from the sink short, and seeing whether I can finagle a connection to the existing drain, without using the flex tube.

I'm hoping the local hardware store has a liberal return policy; this way, I can buy a good collection of PVC tubes and connectors and whatnot, and return what I don't use. I'm not so accomplished at this that I can imagine the pieces that the solution will require.

Again, thanks!
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Carm
Date: May 27, 2009 03:50AM
[visual.merriam-webster.com]


This is what it should look like. smiling smiley
If I had your situation. I would rip the drywall/sheetrock to get access to the funky pipes, cut and reconnect one drain. (just to clean it up)

Easiest to cut the top pipe back and seal it with a cap.
Get the parts you see in the picture above. Pipes should be slightly angled towards the drain.

Flex tube is a crap collector. Get a p trap with access on the bottom, easier to clean out, but make sure you always have teflon tape to seal the plug after you clean it out.

P.S. the pipes should be standard size.
The link Ken Sp. posted is interesting. In both of my houses, first built in 1992, second house built in 2002 had plumbing as pictured above. Both worked fine and I can only remember having to take plumbing apart two times that I lived there. (total of five years)
Joe



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/27/2009 04:09AM by Carm.
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: ztirffritz
Date: May 27, 2009 09:34AM
I'm on a first name basis with the staff at the local Ace Hardware store.



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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Plumbking
Date: May 27, 2009 09:42AM
Greg I PM'd you
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: billb
Date: May 27, 2009 09:52AM
This didn't get fixed 6 months (or so) ago ?
:-)
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Greg
Date: May 27, 2009 10:08AM
Plumbking: Thanks!
billb: Yes. This is to repair my crappy fix. (I was hoping no one remembered. :-) )
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: artie67
Date: May 27, 2009 07:37PM
The dishwasher discharge hose(black rubber on top left) should be connected to the inlet at the top of the disposal. Be sure to punch out the plug with a screwdriver. It's like a slug in an electrical box. Retrieve from the inside of the unit. This will allow the food waste from the dishwasher to be ground further and not settle in the drain.
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: JoeH
Date: May 27, 2009 08:02PM
Quote
Greg
Plumbking: Thanks!
billb: Yes. This is to repair my crappy fix. (I was hoping no one remembered. :-) )

I remembered also, just chose not to bring it up. jest smiley



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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Greg
Date: May 27, 2009 08:16PM
Quote
JoeH
Quote
Greg
Plumbking: Thanks!
billb: Yes. This is to repair my crappy fix. (I was hoping no one remembered. :-) )

I remembered also, just chose not to bring it up. jest smiley

And I can respect that! :-)
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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Black
Date: May 27, 2009 08:41PM
Quote
Carm
[visual.merriam-webster.com]


This is what it should look like. smiling smiley
If I had your situation. I would rip the drywall/sheetrock to get access to the funky pipes, cut and reconnect one drain. (just to clean it up)

Easiest to cut the top pipe back and seal it with a cap.
Get the parts you see in the picture above. Pipes should be slightly angled towards the drain.

Flex tube is a crap collector. Get a p trap with access on the bottom, easier to clean out, but make sure you always have teflon tape to seal the plug after you clean it out.

P.S. the pipes should be standard size.
The link Ken Sp. posted is interesting. In both of my houses, first built in 1992, second house built in 2002 had plumbing as pictured above. Both worked fine and I can only remember having to take plumbing apart two times that I lived there. (total of five years)
Joe

Ah yes, no home repair advice thread would be complete without the "rip it all out and start over" post :-)




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Re: A post, wherein Greg pictorially asks a question about kitchen plumbing
Posted by: Carm
Date: May 28, 2009 02:53AM
Damn Straight Black.
tongue sticking out smiley
Make a bigger mess out of it. Ha ha ha
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