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One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: Paul F.
Date: August 05, 2009 12:29AM
So I was googling for some darn thing or other... Something about food - I think.

I ran across a recipe for Beef Burgundy (more properly, boeuf bourguignon - [en.wikipedia.org] )... and from there an article about Julia Childs time in the OSS. Yes, really - Julia Child was in the OSS before she was in Julia's Kitchen... But I digress...

Whatever recipe page I was on got me thinking about food traditions that are being slowly lost to "easier" and more trendy foods - to say nothing of "fast foods".

There are reasons that spit roasted boar over an open fire is no longer done so often...
[fxcuisine.com] (Warning... some icky pics before the pig is on the spit over the fire..)
Some things are just not easy to do any more. Some foods (Haggis, for example, all joking aside) were created to make best use of various bits that no longer need to be eaten - so some foods have languished that way.
Likewise, "quick cured" meats have taken the place of long, slow, cures of bacon, salami's and the like.

Even the simple Cheese Fondue seems to be fading away...
(this has very little to do with cheese fondue, but is really cool anyway... [fxcuisine.com] ) I'd really like a house like that one day - only maybe with better central heat, and a bigger kitchen...

Buried in my Tivo "archives" is an episode of Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (Travel Channel... an insufferably "New York sarcastic" chef, but he visits some very neat places) - "Disappearing Manhattan", and in that show he discusses the "traditional" chop-house and dishes that are hardly ever found on menu's any more: Marrow bones, and Mutton Chops for example.

I have to admit I've wanted to try Mutton for a long time, but have never found a place to get any. I think I could special order it from a local butcher shop, but I haven't decided if I want to try it badly enough to special-order it.. Someplace or other, have General Washintons favorite recipe: Stoved Potatoes and Mutton Chops. No one eats Mutton any more, but before WWII, it was on almost every table quite commonly!

This is all bringing me around to a convoluted question for you all....
We have a pretty wide variety of people here... quite a number of regions, internationally...

So I felt like asking; What sort of food, or dish, or particular recipe, that was once considered something of a "staple" food - is now hardly ever prepared in home or restaurant?
What dish would you nominate of your experience, region, or culture, or even just childhood memory, to be put into a hypothetical "Ark" of Recipe's to be "saved" for eternity in addition to what's "popular" today?

I'll toss out an example (maybe not the best one... but it's a bit late and I was up early...).
From my Fathers, Mothers, side of the Family:
Palt (Scandinavian origin...)
[www.grouprecipes.com]
[www.cooks.com]

I don't know how Palt fares in the old country, but in the upper plains states where Swedes settled, it's not found on many tables any more. My dad had it all the time growing up, but I've only had it a few times in my life (but liked it!).

Give me more ideas for culinary "roads less traveled" to try!
Not necessarily down the "Haggis lane" sort of things... just those back roads that used to be the main road before the railroad went in over the hill... so to speak..

So?



Paul F.
-----
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca c. 5 BC - 65 AD
----
Good is the enemy of Excellent. Talent is not necessary for Excellence.
Persistence is necessary for Excellence. And Persistence is a Decision.

--

--

--
Eureka, CA
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: M>B>
Date: August 05, 2009 01:32AM
Worlds largest recipe archive...

[www.recipesource.com]
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: btfc
Date: August 05, 2009 01:49AM
On the scandinavian theme: Æbleskiver

[scandinavianfood.about.com]

Yorkshire pudding?

[britishfood.about.com]

I'll come back tomorrow when I'm not so tired and can be more imaginative.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/05/2009 01:55AM by btfc.
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: Octave Doctor
Date: August 05, 2009 02:34AM
My mom used to bake bread once a week, she baked all the time, but Wednesday was Bread Day--she'd bake a couple loaves of plain bread, then three pans of rolls with raisins, but no cinnamon (my dad didn't go for cinnamon). She'd make a thin glaze of brown sugar to make up for the cinnamon--these were great just barely cold from the oven.
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: Don C
Date: August 05, 2009 07:21AM
I have to second the homemade bread. My tasty recollection is Mother baking two or three loaves of bread plus cinnamon rolls while Dad, brother, maybe younger sister, and I took down the wood frame screens from all the windows and washed and put up the wood frame storm windows. Usually Dad would have his University of Iowa football game on the transistor radio (anybody remember Coach Evashevski?).

After a few years of this, Mother decided that it was way too much work for something that would be devoured so quickly.

Hand cranked ice cream is certainly something we don't do any more.

Looking through the church fund raiser cook books reveals a wealth of recipes that we don't do much any more, often for health reasons as much as effort required.
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: Lee3
Date: August 05, 2009 09:58AM
Hand making bread is a lot of work...sure tastes good though.
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: JoeH
Date: August 05, 2009 10:34AM
There are dishes my 2nd generation German-American grandma made I don't even know the names of that I miss a bit. She learned them from her mother and grandmother. But what I really miss are the molasses cookies and Boston brown bread she used to make. The cookies relied on a form of molasses that is very difficult to find these days, and were delicious. The brown bread recipe she got from her sister who married a Boston native, and the recipe was in his family. The commercial cans of it are good, but not even close to this fresh from the oven.

P.S. Brown bread has raisins, the stuf without is imitation! angry villagers smiley



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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: btfc
Date: August 05, 2009 12:20PM
Here's a bread recipe my family used to make. Great for rolls, too.

Anadama Bread

[www.nytimes.com]
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: freeradical
Date: August 05, 2009 12:45PM
Quote
Paul F.

So I felt like asking; What sort of food, or dish, or particular recipe, that was once considered something of a "staple" food - is now hardly ever prepared in home or restaurant?

Foods that are normally roasted or braised are typically not on restaurant menus with the exception of roast beef. These foods take too long to cook, so grilling is very popular. If you make too much of something that is roasted or braised, a restaurant will lose money unless they can find a use for the leftovers. If a restaurant does not make enough of a braised or roasted food, customers will complain if they see someone else eating something that they can't order.

For the record, I have braised cow tongue at home. It takes a LONG time.
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: August 05, 2009 01:36PM
....probably not to pleasant for the cow either.......



_____________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: pdq
Date: August 05, 2009 01:47PM
We went back to the old farmhouse last year. Noone lives there anymore, and it was falling apart- you could see the sky through parts of the roof. But we happened upon a box of Grandma's old recipes!

Thinking sure we found a treasure, we rescued them from certain decay and took the box home. On the way, I started looking through them to see what we had. Much to my chagrin, most of the recipes were for various pickled things, or different ways of using jello (including main dishes).

See, Grandma was a depression era farm wife, and her family just barely scraped through the drought years back then. I guess when you're in that situation, you have to put the boeuf bourguignon aside, and see if your kids can survive on jello and pickled beets.
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Re: One of those "What out-of-the-ordinary dish or recipe should I try next" sorts of threads. (Complete with links and ramblings)
Posted by: JoeH
Date: August 05, 2009 02:58PM
Well, good pickled beets have their own place as well. Same for many of the other pickled foods, some of those flavors have just disappeared from our diets. But every so often some chef brings one back as if it is new, as an edible garnish or condiment for a dish. So look carefully through them. She may have had another collection for better times and meals, instead of the every day, and kept those elsewhere.



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