advertisement
Forums

 

AAPL stock: Click Here

You are currently viewing the 'Friendly' Political Ranting forum
relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: hal
Date: May 21, 2020 11:19AM
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: wave rider
Date: May 21, 2020 12:27PM
Funny and accurate!



=wr=
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: timg
Date: May 21, 2020 01:59PM
Makes sense the alcohol went up. It's obviously all the hand sanitizer, right???



Skill without imagination is craftsmanship. Imagination without skill is Modern Art.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: Markintosh
Date: May 21, 2020 02:25PM
We're certainly not alcoholics, but our alcohol consumption is up probably about 300%. Last month's gas bill was 10% of normal.



“Live your life, love your life, don’t regret…live, learn and move forward positively.” – CR Johnson
Loving life in Lake Tahoe, CA
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: Speedy
Date: May 21, 2020 06:25PM
TP is still in short supply.

“Where is all the toilet paper going? Charmin and other manufacturers say they are producing 24/7. I haven't been able to buy any since March 6. I realize this is not the No. 1 problem we face, but I'm still curious as to how so much could be produced and not show up on grocery shelves.” —Eileen in Minnesota

Ah yes, the elusive roll of toilet paper, universal symbol of American quarantine culture. TP shortages have been a constant since the early days of the pandemic, when manufacturers assured us they'd be temporary. They were not. Why?

"Early on it was straight-up panic hoarding, but more recently it's gotten a little complicated," Post business reporter Laura Reiley said.

It's a three-ply problem, if you will. First, all those stay-at-home orders have led to more stay-at-home pooping. "Companies have estimated that 40 percent more toilet paper is being used at home than during normal times," Reiley said.

Second, retailers can't simply restock their shelves with office-grade toilet paper when they run out of the plush stuff. "Toilet paper destined for commercial use is different than the Charmin, etc., we use at home," Reiley said. "It is often made of recycled material and isn't the quilted multi-ply we buy for home. Often those rolls are bigger, fit into different kinds of dispensers, and so forth. So that toilet paper destined for commercial use is sitting in limbo with no takers."

And the final layer of the problem: "Because profit margins are low for toilet paper, the companies that produce it have just enough equipment to fill ordinary orders," Reiley said. "Even running the machinery around the clock, companies haven't been able to keep up with retail demand."

If you're in desperate need, she recommends scouting out smaller shops, convenience store and dollar stores that might not have been picked clean. "Everyone has been swarming the big box stores for it, so outsmart them and look elsewhere."



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: SDGuy
Date: May 21, 2020 07:27PM
Quote
Speedy
TP is still in short supply...

That's the one thing that really surprised me - when the big panic finally became reality, it's toilet paper that was the first to go.

Thinking ahead a bit, I can't wait to see future disaster movies - be it an impending meteor or asteroid strike, zombie apocalypse, nuclear war, or (of course) pandemic - the obligatory scenes of panicked mobs escaping in their vehicles will now have to more realistically portrayed with minivans and compact SUVs packed to the gills with toilet paper - the inevitable vehicle crash scenes will be even more enjoyable, with veritable explosions made up of toilet paper rolls being flung out of vehicles (like the Death Star exploding - but with all the debris made up of massive quantities of individual rolls of TP, and of course, the hero's vehicle nimbly dodging around the flying TP obstacles).
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: deckeda
Date: May 21, 2020 10:17PM
Nothing about that TP supply excuse makes any sense. It’s not that Walmart wants to stock industrial paper but can’t figure out how. Also, if profits are low, you effing RAISE prices sufficient to build orders. This isn’t hard to figure out.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: RgrF
Date: May 23, 2020 12:39AM
It was not an American thing, the instant run on toilet paper was pretty much worldwide. Third world counties who never saw a roll to begin with weren't bothered by the shortage.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: hal
Date: May 23, 2020 02:27PM
it's the run on bottled water that makes me scratch my head...
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: May 23, 2020 06:00PM
Quote
hal
it's the run on bottled water that makes me scratch my head...

Fears of worst case scenario:
- Covid-19 turns out to be highly contagious; easily transmitted in a number of ways
- Casualty rate or incapacitation rate is very high
- All sectors of society are impacted
- Afflicted includes employees/operators of vital public infrastructure; i.e. public utilities
- Insufficient workforce available to operate and maintain those public utilities
- Systems suffer reduced capabilities and outages
- Full, normal availability of potable water lost
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: relative importance in 2020 so far (a graph for graph lovers)
Posted by: RgrF
Date: May 23, 2020 07:51PM
Either that or Nestle succeeds in privatizing supplies.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login

Online Users

Guests: 124
Record Number of Users: 186 on February 20, 2020
Record Number of Guests: 2330 on October 25, 2018