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Death Rally Days Rocky Raccoon edition: Fireworks in the Wilderness
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: July 03, 2020 07:10AM
In this version, Rocky goes to the revival...and dies of the plague.

Now somewhere in the Black Mountain Hills of Dakota
There lived a young boy named Rocky Raccoon

'we shoot guys wearin' masks around here, Stranger'


The Great Leader and 'my wife' wing in hundreds and hundreds of miles from any Democrats to see fireworks and ignore the native American owners of Mt Rushmore


We won't be social distancing," Republican Gov. Kristi Noem


"We're getting them at the great monument. We're getting them. I got fireworks. For 20 years or something it hasn't been allowed for environmental reasons. You believe that one? It's all stone. So I'm trying to say where's the environmental reason? Anyway, I got it approved, so I'm going to go there on July 3rd, and they're going to have the big fireworks," Trump said.

Death Rally Days-another chance to die for your Leader.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/03/2020 07:10AM by Steve G..
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Re: Death Rally Days Rocky Raccoon edition: Fireworks in the Wilderness
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: July 03, 2020 07:31AM

here in NYC, things are different
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Re: Death Rally Days Rocky Raccoon edition: Fireworks in the Wilderness
Posted by: S. Pupp
Date: July 03, 2020 07:56AM
Quote
Steve G.
Death Rally Days-another chance to die for your Leader.

“What do you get for pretending the dangers not real.
Meek and obedient you follow the leader
Down well trodden corridors, into the valley of steel.
What a surprise!
A look of terminal shock in your eyes.
Now things are really what they seem
No, this is no bad dream.“
-Pink Floyd, “Sheep”
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Re: Death Rally Days Rocky Raccoon edition: Fireworks in the Wilderness
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: July 03, 2020 08:27AM
In a 2017 document made public by The Washington Post, the National Park Service noted that a minimum of 27 wildfires had been started around Mount Rushmore during annual fireworks displays between 1998 and 2009 and warned that "July fire danger risk can be high to very high" in the Black Hills area.

A former National Park Service employee who was in charge of the fire management program at Mount Rushmore and six other Black Hills park sites, and who saw trees set ablaze more than 1,000 feet from the fireworks' launch point, says shooting fireworks over the national monument's 1,278 acres of forest is "insane."


"The president likes to say, 'well, what can burn, it's rock, right?' " Bill Gabbert, who is now managing editor of the online publication Wildfire Today, tells NPR.

"Yeah, the carving itself is rock, and right below the carving is rock that was carved off in order to make the sculpture," Gabbert adds. "But beyond that, there's a Ponderosa pine forest. The Black Hills generally is a tinder box this time of year, and right now, they're in a drought."



The Black Hills is in a drought this year. Yes, insane.


[www.npr.org]
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Re: Death Rally Days Rocky Raccoon edition: Fireworks in the Wilderness
Posted by: S. Pupp
Date: July 03, 2020 09:18AM
From wikipedia: "[The] initial idea was to sculpt the Needles; however, Gutzon Borglum rejected the Needles because of the poor quality of the granite and strong opposition from the Lakota (Sioux), who consider the Black Hills to be sacred ground; it was originally included in the Great Sioux Reservation. The United States broke up the territory after gold was discovered in the Black Hills."

I'm growing less proud of our country day by day.
We need to change our collective priorities.
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Re: Death Rally Days Rocky Raccoon edition: Fireworks in the Wilderness
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: July 03, 2020 09:37AM
Quote
S. Pupp
From wikipedia: "[The] initial idea was to sculpt the Needles; however, Gutzon Borglum rejected the Needles because of the poor quality of the granite and strong opposition from the Lakota (Sioux), who consider the Black Hills to be sacred ground; it was originally included in the Great Sioux Reservation. The United States broke up the territory after gold was discovered in the Black Hills."

I'm growing less proud of our country day by day.
We need to change our collective priorities.

A little long, but good reading:

[en.wikipedia.org]

The Great Sioux War of 1876, also known as the Black Hills War, was a series of battles and negotiations which occurred in 1876 and 1877 between the Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, and the United States. The cause of the war was the desire of the U.S. government to obtain ownership of the Black Hills. Gold had been discovered in the Black Hills, settlers began to encroach onto Native American lands, and the Sioux and Cheyenne refused to cede ownership to the U.S. Traditionally, the United States military and historians place the Lakota at the center of the story, especially given their numbers, but some Indians believe the Cheyenne were the primary target of the U.S. campaign.[5]

Among the many battles and skirmishes of the war was the Battle of the Little Bighorn, often known as Custer's Last Stand, the most storied of the many encounters between the U.S. army and mounted Plains Indians. That Indian victory notwithstanding, the U.S. leveraged national resources to force the Indians to surrender, primarily by attacking and destroying their encampments and property. The Great Sioux War took place under the presidencies of Ulysses S. Grant and Rutherford B. Hayes. The Agreement of 1877 (19 Stat. 254, enacted February 28, 1877) officially annexed Sioux land and permanently established Indian reservations.



[www.pbs.org]

Why do the nine tribes constituting the Great Sioux Nation, including those on Pine Ridge, staunchly refuse to accept $1.3 billion from the federal government?

The refusal of the money pivots on a feud that dates back to the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, signed by Sioux tribes and Gen. William T. Sherman, that guaranteed the tribes “undisturbed use and occupation” of a swath of land that included the Black Hills, a resource-rich region of western South Dakota. But in 1877, one year after Gen. George Armstrong Custer’s infamous defeat at the hands of Crazy Horse at Little Bighorn and without the consent of “three-fourths of all adult male Indians” stipulated by the treaty, the government seized the Black Hills, along with their gold, and began profiting from the protected land.

Fast forward to 1980. The Supreme Court agreed with the Sioux: The land, long since settled, had been taken from them wrongfully, and $102 million was set aside as compensation. The trust’s value continues to grow well beyond $1 billion, but the Sioux have never collected.

One key problem: The tribes say the payment is invalid because the land was never for sale and accepting the funds would be tantamount to a sales transaction. Ross Swimmer, former special trustee for American Indians, said the trust fund remains untouched for one reason: “They didn’t want the money. They wanted the Black Hills.”

“The Sioux tribes have always maintained that that confiscation was illegal and the tribes must have some of their ancestral lands returned to them, and they’ve maintained that position since 1877,” said Mario Gonzalez, general counsel for the Oglala Sioux Tribe, who has devoted much of his career to the issue...

Tribal leaders are quick to point out that not only does the $1.3 billion represent a fraction compared to the monetary value of gold, minerals and timber extracted from it, it is based on value at the time of the treaty, not the present. And further, if distributed on a per capita basis across nine tribes, the money would soon be gone with little permanent benefit to the recipients.

“If you took the money, it would be [a] pittance. Our numbers are too big in terms of population, and the dollars would be expended in a hurry…in a week, two weeks’ time, you’re broke, and you don’t have anything,” said Bordeaux.

Two Bulls agreed. “If we accept the money, then we have no more of the treaty obligations that the federal government has with us for taking our land, for taking our gold, all our resources out of the Black Hills … we’re poor now, we’ll be poorer then when that happens,” she said.




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Re: Death Rally Days Rocky Raccoon edition: Fireworks in the Wilderness
Posted by: S. Pupp
Date: July 03, 2020 02:22PM
It is good reading. Thank you.
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