advertisement
Forums

The Forum is sponsored by 
 

AAPL stock: Click Here

You are currently viewing the Tips and Deals forum
Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: wowzer
Date: July 10, 2006 05:41PM
How do I get rid of this thing? I've scrapped off the old caulk in the past. I've recaulked with mold and mildew resistant latex material (from home depot). The mold and mildew (the little black dots) came back worse than before.

I know that the only way to avoid it is to dry the tub after each use (i.e. do not let water stand). However, I cannot enforce this with the kids...and my mother-in-law does not follow directions well.

Thus, I've been reduced to stripping the old caulk, but want to recaulk with something better (i.e. wont grow those pesky little black dots).

HELP!



All I ever really needed to know, I learned from watching Star Trek.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: MysteryGuest
Date: July 10, 2006 05:44PM
Don't know if it's the same problem, but I find straight bleach in a spray bottle (rinse after 10 or 20 minutes) does the trick here. Just be careful how you store and label it.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: Racer X
Date: July 10, 2006 05:46PM
there is one thing that would work, but it is ugly.

Permatex Copper RTV silicone. It is a high-temp gasket RTV silicone caulking, loaded with copper. the copper will kill and prevent the mildew. think bottom paint on a boat. But it is copper colored.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: July 10, 2006 05:47PM
U sure the mold isn't comin' from within the wall?


Otherwise bleach kills mold. . .use Tilex. . .



_____________________________________

I reject your reality and substitute my own!
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: Racer X
Date: July 10, 2006 05:56PM
we use bleach when we have too, btw. It does work.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: Mike Johnson
Date: July 10, 2006 06:30PM
A good acrylic latex caulk is about the best solution you're going to find. Maybe try a different brand? Also, after you strip off the old caulk, really wash the area and treat it with a dilute bleach solution so mold & mildew can't sneak in from the back of the caulk.

Do you have fans or anything to help air out the bathroom after the shower was used?
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: Racer X
Date: July 10, 2006 06:42PM
There are siliconized-acrylic latex caulks with milldewcide added. I know that it is either DAP or Polyseamseal brand that has one with twice the mildewcide added compared to their competition. look for that.

I believe that either Home Depot or Lowe's carries it, as I have seen it at one of those 2 places, as well as at our local Super Fred Meyer.

But the root of the problem is the freestanding water at the caulk line. I wish that tub manufacturers would make the damn things with a 10 degree inward slope towards the tub, or a serious "cove" taper at the top. (I guess that would be a name for it. You get my meaning)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/10/2006 06:44PM by Racer X.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: ajakeski
Date: July 10, 2006 07:19PM
The mold is coming from behind the caulk like Newton said. You need to cure the mold problem in the wall before caulking the joint.




I'm not a bad guy! I work hard, and I love my kids. So why should I spend half my Sunday hearing about how I'm going to Hell? -Homer.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: Carm
Date: July 10, 2006 09:11PM
Q. I have a bath with black all around the tub and underneath the caulking. I have removed and cleaned twice and it keeps coming back. Now that I have read all the side effects to mold, I think I might have an allergy to it. Is there someone in the St. Louis area that is in the "mold business"? Also does your do it yourself test kits include the dangerous black mold test? [June 25, 2003]
A. You may have a water leak INSIDE your bathroom wall or floor that enables the mold to grow and to keep re-appearing. Alternatively or in addition to a water intrusion problem, you may also have too high a humidity in the bathroom [above 60% humidity level enables mold to grow], thus enabling mold to grow.. During and after tub baths and showers, you should be running an exhaust fan that exhausts the humid bathroom air directly to the outside. Be sure your bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans exhaust air directly to the outside and NOT [as is frequently found] into wall cavities, floor cavities, the attic, the basement, or into a crawl space. Exhaust fans can put large amounts of moisture-laden air into such areas, and thus cause serious mold growth and problems. You can read all about mold inspection, mold testing, and removing bathroom mold on the how to, informative pages of Mold and Mold Inspector. Use do it yourself mold test kits from a large hardware, home improvement, or safety store.

[www.moldinspector.com]
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: Racer X
Date: July 11, 2006 12:38AM
I concur. We have a monster exhaust fan that is rated for a bathroom 70% larger, and we run it with the window cracked open.

Don't try the toilet paper fluttering in front of the fan trick. It isn't accurate. I believe that you need at least 1.1 times square footage of the room in CFM of fan capacity to just meet building code. Most of the standard Broan/Nutone cheap square ones with the heat lamp everyone used for decades are 80 CFM or less, which is barely adequate for only a 10x7 bathroom. Another formula is:

Step 1: Calculate the cubic feet of your bathroom (length x width x height)
Step 2: Divide by 60 (the number of minutes in an hour)
Step 3: Multiply the result by 8 (the number of recommended air changes per hour)

If there is no excessive moisture for any significant length of time, no mildew. Big fan and a timer will work wonders.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/11/2006 12:39AM by Racer X.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: mikebw
Date: July 11, 2006 12:52AM
Small diameter fans also tend to be noisier due to the higher RPM's needed to move any decent amount of air. I would look for a big one myself based on that alone.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: Racer X
Date: July 11, 2006 01:43AM
Yep, big and slow, which usually are quiet and low or no vibration as well.
Options:  Reply • Quote
Re: Help! Mold on Bath Tub Caulk
Posted by: Phy
Date: July 11, 2006 01:17PM
If you wire this high-powered fan into the light switch, then the kids will be turning the fan on when the light goes on. That's a no-brainer for most people but kids often do not like the fan noise, and won't turn on a separately-wired fan.
Just a thought...
Options:  Reply • Quote
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login

Online Users

Guests: 168
Record Number of Users: 186 on February 20, 2020
Record Number of Guests: 5122 on October 03, 2020