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Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: 3d
Date: August 06, 2006 06:19PM
So i'm helping my parents clean out a furnished basement this afternoon and while moving an old couch i discover soggy drywall behind there going up from the floor to around 2 feet high. It's an eight foot stretch of wall that has been damaged. The drywall was soft to the touch and mushy. I kicked it and it just crumbled away.

Is there any way to salvage any of the wall? Or do i need to replace the entire wall from floor to ceiling? It's a basement, so it doesn't need to be pretty.

I was thinking that maybe i could get away with just ripping out the soggy drywall and covering the 2 foot high by 8 foot long hole with some MDF or plywood and painting it over. If i put some molding on the edge to finish it off, maybe it'll look like a wierd ledge or something.

I don't suppose any MRF'ers located in the NYC area (BayRidge, Brooklyn) want to make a few hundred bucks?

Other than calling a pro, any advice? Thanks in advance!
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: Phy
Date: August 06, 2006 06:24PM
You will want to find the source of the moisture that damaged the wall, and then you'll need to waterproof or otherwise repair the wall to prevent more damage.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: 3d
Date: August 06, 2006 06:31PM
A clogged drain pipe (leaves) in the backyard was the source of the water getting into this area of the basement. It's been fixed. No water has gotten into the basement again.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: Bernie
Date: August 06, 2006 06:33PM
4 by 8 laid sideways. With that in mind measure 4 feet from floor and draw a line and cut. Inspect the walls, and find the source. They make some @#$%& or Goo that comes in white that should do the job.


Okay it is UGL!




Staunton, Virginia
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: Ken Sp.
Date: August 06, 2006 06:41PM
If you think it will ever get wet again you can use the green drywall.
It is best to have the drywall about 1/2 from the ground so if there is a small amount of water--it will not wick up.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: grad
Date: August 06, 2006 06:47PM
just replace the soggy areas with new drywall.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: 3d
Date: August 06, 2006 06:58PM
Sorry, if my questions are really basic. I'm a renter. Never had to deal with any of this stuff before. I just called the super if there was ever a prob... Trying to save my parents a few bucks by just doing it myself.

Ok.. so i measure up 4 feet from the floor. Cut away and rip out the soggy drywall. And replace only the part that is buckling and mushy. I keep the "dry" drywall that is above it.

After the demo i'll end up with a hole 4 feet high from the floor that goes along the length of the wall for about 8 feet.

Then i put up some new drywall a half inch off the floor that is cut to the dimensions i need and screw it in to the studs somewhere. Does that sound about right?

What do i use to fill in the seam between the old drywall and new drywall? Unless i cut it perfectly there's gonna be a gash.

Thanks for the help so far. I need to watch more Home-Fix-It shows on TV tongue sticking out smiley
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: BigGuynRusty
Date: August 06, 2006 07:04PM
Quote
3d
What do i use to fill in the seam between the old drywall and new drywall? Unless i cut it perfectly there's gonna be a gash.

Thanks for the help so far. I need to watch more Home-Fix-It shows on TV tongue sticking out smiley

Drywall Tape, and mud.

BGnR



"Good heavens, Miss Sakamoto! You're beautiful!"
"If we dig precious things from the land, we will invite disaster."
"Near the day of Purification, there will be cobwebs spun back and forth in the sky."
"A container of ashes might one day be thrown from the sky, which could burn the land and boil the oceans."
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: rgG
Date: August 06, 2006 07:13PM
Mud, in case you are a real newb to this sort of thing is "Drywall Joint compound". Get a small bucket of the pre-mixed stuff. It will be a lot easier to work with than the dry powdered kind.

Do a google search for "taping a drywall joint" or something similar and you will see how to do it. The fibergalss mesh tape works easier than the paper tape.

Edit: here's a link:
[fficial" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.google.com]





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/06/2006 07:14PM by rgG.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: 3d
Date: August 06, 2006 07:14PM
Drywall tape and joint compound. Ok, got it.
[www.diynetwork.com]

Ok i think i'm ready.. I'll tackle this project sometime next weekend. It sounds pretty easy. Once i start digging around the wall i just hope i don't find any surprises...
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: BigGuynRusty
Date: August 06, 2006 07:31PM
Quote
3d
Once i start digging around the wall i just hope i don't find any surprises...

SNAKES!!

rgG is correct, FiberGlass mesh tape is the best.
Good Luck!
Utility Knife with new blades is the best for cutting drywall. I love the "snap a blade off" kind, they are thinner, and sharper than the "replace a blade" kind.
Do not try to cut completely through the drywall in one fell swoop.

BGnR



"Good heavens, Miss Sakamoto! You're beautiful!"
"If we dig precious things from the land, we will invite disaster."
"Near the day of Purification, there will be cobwebs spun back and forth in the sky."
"A container of ashes might one day be thrown from the sky, which could burn the land and boil the oceans."
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: Bernie
Date: August 06, 2006 07:39PM
I prefer to use screws, not nails and sink them just below the surface so you can cover them with mud. Sand with a wet sponge, rinse and sand again with the wet sponge until it is somewhat smooth. New people should use wider tools and paper tape. If you do use sandpaper the paper will sand away but that Fiberglass tape will catch and pull and make more work for ya. Your seam will not be flat that is why you make it broad. This will all make sense when you are done. Apply fresh mud, scrap excess and discard excess. Do not use dirty mud, and feel free to thin down the new mud with water.




Staunton, Virginia
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: tuqqer
Date: August 06, 2006 07:40PM
If the existing 4x8 sheetrock was laid sideways (i.e., 8' long, 4' high), try to just replace the piece(s) up to the existing horizontal seam. That may allow you to remove the existing mud that joined the top and bottom pieces. As you're knocking out the old, do so from the bottom up; that'll allow you to "discover" the existing seam location.

Sheetrock (aka drywall) has a tapered edge along the long side. This allows the tape to sit below the plane of the wall and not buldge out when you mud over it.

Screw the new rock on. Don't nail. Counter sink just a bit, not so deep as to nullify the holding effect.

And as rgG said, ONLY use the fiberglass self-sticking tape, and ONLY use the pre-mixed mud. If you open up the pre-mixed mud bucket and find that it's pretty thick, don't hesitate to add a bit of water to thin it out just a bit.

When mudding, take one last swipe (with your 6" blade) to smooth it over. Don't worry if you have to apply 2 or 3 coats. It's better to put less on, than too much.

Between coats, most people sand. I always preferred a large wet sponge and a bucket of water. I'll sand a bit on the last coat, but man I prevented a lot of dust by learning the wet sponge method from an old codger early in my remodeling days.

As Ken Sp. said: leave a gap at the bottom. Don't let the rock touch the floor; best trick for preventing damage in future spills.

Post before and after pics once you're done.

I used to have the strangest arm muscles when I was rocking a lot, back in the day.



Mac mini (M1 2020, 16G 2T) Big Sur 11.x Dual 25" Acer 1440p LCDs11" i5 MacBook Air



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/06/2006 07:43PM by tuqqer.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: modelamac
Date: August 06, 2006 07:49PM
Drywall comes in 4 ' by 8' in varying thicknesses. Match the existing thickness as best you can.

Cut the "hole" 4 feet + 1/2 inch high, and 8 feet long. You will not have to cut the new drywall this way.

Before you start destroying stuff, be sure you have marked each vertical stud that is to be used to attach the drywall. Your 8 foot length must begin and end on a stud.

Use a level to keep your cuts horizontal and vertical, to minimize having to cut the new drywall.



Ed (modelamac)

I think I will just put an OUT OF ORDER
sticker on my head and call it a day.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: Paul F.
Date: August 06, 2006 07:50PM
To reinforce what others have already said...

Strip the old drywall (score it with a razor knife where you'll be ending it...).
Make SURE the water has stopped behind it!
You don't get to look behind walls very often... take this opportunity to give whatever is behind there a THOROUGH inspection!

Good time to do a bit of insecticide, and check any insulation behind it also...
I suspect that if you're in a basement, you'll probably find wood strips against the foundation concrete or cinder block wall... Make sure they're not rotten, and still sound, and still attached to the foundation wall properly.

Cut the new drywall to fit (leaving a 1/2" gap or so at the bottom).
I too prefer screws to nails.

Sand lightly with 320 grit (helps the mud/paint stick better...). Just a light going over.
Mud (joint compound) and tape the joints, and over the screw heads.
Once dry, sand the mudded spots wth 320. Go over any "dents" again with mud if necessary.
Wipe with a damp cloth to get any sanding dust.
Prime.
Paint.

Never used the fiberglass mesh tape... friend of mine dislikes it... harder to sand and get a nice flat surface on. Dunno if that's true or he's doing it wrong. My roll of paper tape lasts a LONG time...



Paul F.
-----
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca c. 5 BC - 65 AD
----
Good is the enemy of Excellent. Talent is not necessary for Excellence.
Persistence is necessary for Excellence. And Persistence is a Decision.

--

--

--
Eureka, CA
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: 3d
Date: August 06, 2006 07:54PM
Nice, I didn't know i could use a utility knife to cut through drywall. One less tool to borrow/buy. Fiberglass tape. Premixed mud. Wet sponge as opposed to sanding...

Great newbie drywall tips here. It's just what i need to boost up my confidence. Thanks again. I can practice all this stuff on my PARENT'S house. I'll be a semi-pro at this by the time i buy my own home!

I'll try and remember to take pics. It's the least i can do in exchange for the time you guys have taken to respond. Errr... unless i completely botch up the job. In which case i'll never speak of this again.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: bfd
Date: August 06, 2006 08:41PM
Also, you need to THOROUGHLY dry out the area, the wood, etc. before you attempt your fix. Cut above the mushy part about 6 -8 inches to avoid moist drywall remaining. You gotta get rid of it all, and get rid of all the moisture in the wood, or you'll grow a colony of mold (especially in the environment you've described) that will take over the place.

Set up some fans and let it dry out for at least a few days, a week or more if your relative humidity is constantly above 50%. The same thing happened in our offices two years ago, and they dried the place out for solid 3 weeks before they even began replacing the 3 feet of drywall from the floor up.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: rgG
Date: August 06, 2006 09:19PM
As bfd said, you want to make sure the area behind the new drywall is really dry and mold free. I would probably spray anyplace that had gotten wet with a solution of water and bleach just to kill any mold that might be growing. If you make it a farily strong mix with the bleach, you will need to leave the area until the fumes go away. Do not stand there and breath a heavy bleach mixture.

Good luck. Drywall repair just takes a bit of patience and practice. You should do fine. If it looks really bad, just make sure that is where you put a BIG piece of furniture. grinning smiley





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: Ken Sp.
Date: August 06, 2006 09:50PM
If the wood looks wet and deteriorated you should also treat it with chemicals to stop Dry Rot.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: Racer X
Date: August 06, 2006 10:33PM
I agree about the screws vs nails. nails can pop out, screws can't. I have a whole line of popped nail heads at home that piss me off every time I walk into that room. But not pissed off enough to fix them.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: M A V I C
Date: August 07, 2006 12:24AM
I'm glad someone brought up making sure the area is completely dry and free of mold. You may even want to have it tested as the mold may not be visible, but closing in the area will help it grow.

It's a common misconception that using bleach will kill mold - or at least that it's a solution if you do have mold. It does kill it some, but not enough.

[www.enviroshield-moldprevention.com]
- Chlorine bleach produces off-gases after it is applied. Chlorine off gassing can be harmful and may cause pulmonary embolisms in some people.
- Chlorine will "flash" or dissipates preventing sufficient contact to kill the mold hyphae. Some bacteria and fungi need to be submerged for a minimum of thirty minutes to be killed.
- Chlorine, because it "flashes," evaporates faster than its water base leaving moisture in the contaminated area, which encourages and supports mold growth.
- Bleach is also 99% water, which is one of the main contributors to the growth of harmful bacteria and mold. Current experiments when mold was treated, using bleach allowed mold to regenerate faster and more densely than the original colony. As a result of bleach being used, there are some mold strains that are resistant to chlorine.





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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: Michael
Date: August 07, 2006 05:40AM
I'll be joining you in this type of project. Found a leaking sink in the basement yesterday morning. After turning it off and drying the floor, I tore out the destroyed sink cabinet and then started ripping out sheetrock. Took out about 30 linear feet 2 feet high. Set up fans and sprayed with a "mold killer." I'll wait a couple of weeks with the fans going before I replace it. It was a relatively new faucet and the leak was at the brass connection at the bottom of the faucet. When I took out the sink, the brass simply broke off at the connection. I must have overtighted the hell out of it when I put it in. The whole thing is depressing...

One other hint I didn't see in the posts above--don't overwork the mud. In other words, don't try to make each layer perfect. Put a thin layer of mud on the seam, embed the tape, then a thin layer on top of the tape. Don't worry about it being perfect. I let the first layer dry and then scrape the high points. Do another layer on top of the first and wider, dry and scrape, and then another layer. I sand the final layer. It is messier than using a sponge, but I get much better results with sanding. If you sand slowly, most of the residue will fall to the floor rather than going into the air. If you decide to sand, you might put some cheap plastic over furniture before you sand. Then just bunch it up and toss.
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Re: Soggy Drywall Hellp?
Posted by: M A V I C
Date: August 07, 2006 11:26AM
Michael, did you see mold in the areas you sprayed? If it was thick enough that you could see it, there's a chance the "mold killer" you sprayed only got the surface. Sometimes scrubbing is needed.




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