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Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: Surfrider
Date: April 12, 2014 05:29PM
Some dope....that would be me...had a cable wrapped tightly around a big (24" diameter) maple tree hold a dogs run cable.

I left it up for a bunch of years, today I took it down because I saw that it cut into the bark. This is about 6' off the ground.

I'm afraid I hurt the tree, what should I do to help this big fella out?

I'd hate to lose it.
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: Racer X
Date: April 12, 2014 05:38PM
I believe it will be OK. But I know there is some sort of tar-like stuff you can paint on the "wound" to seal it while the bark closes over the wound.
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: Chakravartin
Date: April 12, 2014 05:44PM
If the cable didn't slice in all around then it's probably okay.

If you lost the bark in a circuit around the tree then that could be trouble.
[en.wikipedia.org]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/12/2014 05:44PM by Chakravartin.
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: Surfrider
Date: April 12, 2014 07:48PM
Yeahhhh, I bolloxed it, sliced in all the way around the tree.

I was thinking about the black tar stuff.
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: Racer X
Date: April 12, 2014 08:05PM
I just know my dad used that black goo when he trimmed larger branches off trees in our yard.
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: April 12, 2014 09:53PM
The black goop people put on tree cuts does nothing..purely cosmetic.

The cut in that bark, if it's going round should be looked at..don't stick any tar in it.

I would start digging pretty deep on the web with some creative googling.

Froma quick Google search:

If the tree is damaged around 100% of the tree, this is called girdling. It is very difficult to save a tree with this much damage and the tree will most likely die. A tree care professional may try a method called repair grafting to bridge the gap in the bark and allow the tree to live long enough to repair itself.
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: haikuman
Date: April 12, 2014 10:57PM
Perhaps with care and dedication you can save the tree. Good Luck

[www.arboristsite.com]

[aces.nmsu.edu]

[www.google.com]

This last link is interesting and includes drawings.

[www.ladybug.uconn.edu]

University of Connecticut

Bridge Grafting and Inarching Damaged Trees

Bridge-grafting and inarching is used to repair trees that have been girdled by mice, rabbits, other rodents or by mechanical injury. Bridge-grafting consists of connecting the cambium layers above and below the girdled area. This process restores the flow of carbohydrates from the leaves down to the roots, thereby allowing the tree to continue its normal life processes. The connection or bridge is usually made with scions. However, uninjured suckers growing from the base of the tree may be inarched or young trees can be planted near the base of the tree and inarched. Trees normally grafted in this manner are apples, pears, walnuts and cherries.

First Aid for Girdled Trees
Partially or completely girdled trees should be protected to prevent drying out of the wood by covering the wound with grafting wax or a water-base asphalt emulsion or asphaltum material. The protection may also help prevent small pieces of remaining living bark from drying out which may then heal, thus helping the tree to survive. Do not use roofing tar, oil-base paints or other oil-based products, as they will only injure the tree further.
Collecting the Scions (Bridge Wood)
Scions (the piece that will form the bridge) must be collected while the wood is dormant. The scions must be of the previous season's growth and should be about the thickness of a pencil. Store them in a sealed plastic bag in the refrigerator. The scions must be of the same or compatible species.

Materials Needed for Grafting
The following material will be needed to complete a bridge graft.
1. Previously collected scions.
2. Grafting wax or water-base asphalt emulsion to protect the grafts from drying out.
3. A sharp knife to shape the scions, trim the wound and cut the bark.
4. Small brads about one inch long to hold the scions in place.
5. A short block of wood or dowel 3/4 of an inch in thickness to help form a bow.

Time to Graft
Sometime after the buds begin to swell in the spring, the bark will peel back or slip easily. The tree is now ready to be grafted. Growth is going on at this time and the scions are less likely to dry out. Occasionally scions are inserted during the summer to replace some that failed.

Preparing the Wound for Grafting
Trim loose and dried bark from the tree. Reshape the girdled area so as to leave a smooth edge. It does not have to be straight across the tree but can be gently curved to follow the shape of the wound. See Fig. 1.



Just continue to follow the link *(:>* there are more instructions and drawings that makes
doing this pretty clear .




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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/12/2014 11:07PM by haikuman.
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: Diana
Date: April 12, 2014 11:03PM
Quote
Surfrider
Some dope....that would be me...had a cable wrapped tightly around a big (24" diameter) maple tree hold a dogs run cable.

I left it up for a bunch of years, today I took it down because I saw that it cut into the bark. This is about 6' off the ground.

I'm afraid I hurt the tree, what should I do to help this big fella out?

If I read this right, you left the cable around the tree and the tree began to grow around the cable, not that the cable "cut" into the tree. When you took the cable down, it left a mark where the tree expanded outward and tried to encase the object it encountered. If this is the case (and you did no real damage when you took the cable down), the tree is probably all right. It looks ugly, and will for a while until the tree is able to grow and fill in the divot left from the cable. It will probably take years for it to do it, and it may be that you will always be able to see it. Trees have a remarkable ability to entomb items left on them or around them (such as chain link fences, or bicycles!). We had a pecan tree that had encased a T-post that was leaning against it. It died, not because of the post, but because of the electric company topping it out during the worst heat of the summer (and the concurrent drought didn't help).

If you are concerned that you have damaged the tree, then certainly call an arborist and see what they say.

Diana
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: April 13, 2014 12:03AM
What Diana said... agree smiley

We have a nice pin oak that my eldest son thought was 'dead' and started to 'chop down'. He girdled about 75% of the tree. 8 years ago. It's still growing strong, but its bark about 4 feet up (now, after growth) looks kind of weird.
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: mikebw
Date: April 14, 2014 07:54AM
Maybe try some wood glue? RollingEyesSmiley5
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: Surfrider
Date: April 15, 2014 09:18AM
Thanks guys and gals, I think I'll just keep an eye on it and see. It looks like it's still healthy...famous last words!
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Re: Cable on Tree, cut into bark
Posted by: fauch
Date: April 16, 2014 01:41PM
Duct tape....
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