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AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: davemchine
Date: November 19, 2014 03:49PM
I see several listings, and sales, for AppleTv1's on the for sale part of the forum. I have one but only use it to stream music. I'm curious why people are still buying them and what they are good for?



Ukulele music I couldn't find anywhere else
[colquhoun.info]
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: silvarios
Date: November 19, 2014 04:22PM
Not a whole lot unless you like only getting content from Apple (and don't mind not having access to recent Apple TV features) or you are willing to add a Broadcom CrystalHD card and run Kodi on Linux. XBMC/Kodi dropped support for the bastardized version of Tiger running on the first gen Apple TV a couple versions back.
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: The Grim Ninja
Date: November 19, 2014 04:33PM
The CrystalHD card with XBMC is still pretty potent. I use it. Throw videos on a network shared drive or USB HD and it'll play almost anything you throw at it.
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: p8712
Date: November 19, 2014 05:04PM
OpenELEC works well for XBMC, as well. Very Snappy.
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: bik
Date: November 19, 2014 05:40PM
Because it has onboard storage, I gave an old ATV1 to my brother and he loads it up before heading to his cabin in Vermont. No broadband or cell service in his area up there, so there's no Netflix streaming and no rental from the iTunes store.

I can imagine a box with local storage being useful in several situations where broadband or network reliability present issues.

On a barely related note, I've got the Comcast X1 with "Cloud" DVR and its lack of reliability leaves me longing for a DVR with local storage.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/19/2014 05:41PM by bik.
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: deckeda
Date: November 19, 2014 08:58PM
Thought I'd read modern iDevices can stream to AppleTV3 without even a WiFi network, an ad hoc network is created. Not as flexible as the AppleTV1's standalone capability.
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: davemchine
Date: November 20, 2014 02:33AM
The stock AppleTv1 could handle 720P video but was limited to around 2500kbps which is too low for a modern blue ray rip. I see with the crystal card it can handle up to 1080P but I'm not seeing any information about supported bit rate. Does anyone know?



Ukulele music I couldn't find anywhere else
[colquhoun.info]
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: silvarios
Date: November 20, 2014 08:58AM
Quote
bik
Because it has onboard storage, I gave an old ATV1 to my brother and he loads it up before heading to his cabin in Vermont. No broadband or cell service in his area up there, so there's no Netflix streaming and no rental from the iTunes store.

I can imagine a box with local storage being useful in several situations where broadband or network reliability present issues.

Sure, but there are lots of boxes that support local storage and modern streaming functionality. While not a great buy for most people (compare to a refurb Roku 2 for $35-$40), a Roku 2 XS with a 1TB 2.5" external will set you back about $100. Compare to a first gen Apple TV with 40GB or 160GB drive that will likely cost at least $50 and be much less limited in times you want streaming.
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: Rick-o
Date: November 20, 2014 09:26AM
Quote
silvarios
Quote
bik
Because it has onboard storage, I gave an old ATV1 to my brother and he loads it up before heading to his cabin in Vermont. No broadband or cell service in his area up there, so there's no Netflix streaming and no rental from the iTunes store.

I can imagine a box with local storage being useful in several situations where broadband or network reliability present issues.

Sure, but there are lots of boxes that support local storage and modern streaming functionality. While not a great buy for most people (compare to a refurb Roku 2 for $35-$40), a Roku 2 XS with a 1TB 2.5" external will set you back about $100. Compare to a first gen Apple TV with 40GB or 160GB drive that will likely cost at least $50 and be much less limited in times you want streaming.

He's heading to his cabin. Carrying along an external drive is just more crap to worry about when packing for his trip. Imagine forgetting that one cable or power supply.

I suspect that bik's brother is going to do more at the cabin than watch AppleTV content during his stay. 40GB will hold more than enough for most people in that situation. Why make it more complicated?

And as for the original post, I still use 2 AppleTV1 boxes. They stream my library perfectly well, and I'm not missing any of the latest and greatest features that aren't supported. I have my AppleTV2 on my main TV for that.



Mr. Lahey: A lot of people, don’t know how to drink. They drink against the grain of the liquor. And when you drink against the grain of the liquor? You lose.

Randy: What the @#$%& are you talking about?
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Re: AppleTv1, what's it good for today?
Posted by: silvarios
Date: November 20, 2014 09:54AM
Quote
Rick-o
He's heading to his cabin. Carrying along an external drive is just more crap to worry about when packing for his trip. Imagine forgetting that one cable or power supply.

I suspect that bik's brother is going to do more at the cabin than watch AppleTV content during his stay. 40GB will hold more than enough for most people in that situation. Why make it more complicated?

The drive plus Roku is smaller than the first gen Apple TV and uses less power to boot. Seems easy enough. One extra drive and micro USB cable is hardly a game changer when it comes to packing. It actually gives flexibility since the two items are not only smaller together than the Apple TV, but can be stashed separately in even smaller cubbies. Then again, save some money and grab this low profile 64GB drive and leave it connected all the time to the Roku or similar media box. [www.amazon.com] As far as 1TB being overkill. then get an even cheaper 500GB drive and still have all your videos to choose from instead of a tiny subset.

If you think keeping an operational first gen Apple TV running for constant travel is less complicated, then we simply have different views on complicated. Having to worry about precisely picking the desired content, followed by clunky iTunes slowly syncing 40-160GB over the network, and finally packing a physically larger device (which is a more limited box when not in use during the few times it is in offline mode) doesn't seem like a great experience. Quickly copying data to a thumb drive (or hard drive with all your content already synced) and then grabbing a much smaller media box seems simple enough. If anything, I'd likely eschew any media box and simply use a phone with video output. Packing one thing is easier than multiple, right?

P.s. I've owned all three devices, first gen 40GB Apple TV (2nd gen too), A host of Roku boxes, including two Roku 2XS models (not all Roku models have local storage capabilities), and a video capable cell phone. From a travel standpoint, the cell phone was by far the easiest to use for travel and since it had upgradeable memory, throwing in an microSD card with some videos was a cinch. The Roku 2 XS was next easiest because of the flexibility offered in media storage and the small size of the box itself compared to the larger stand alone media boxes. The Apple TV was the clunkiest for me and I never ended up traveling with one. However, video capabilities between devices can differ so ripping video for each targeted device can be a chore.



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 11/20/2014 10:07AM by silvarios.
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