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CO alarm (12 ppm)
Posted by: space-time
Date: November 02, 2015 05:47PM
I have a CO alarm on hallway which should be replaced in 2018. I like to be proactive so I bought a new one well ahead of time, and this one has an LED display. I put it in kids bedroom near their bed (plugged in an outlet). I plan to get one for our bedroom too.

It came from factory with MAX level at 11 ppm. I reset it. I always look at it when I go in that room, and I never saw anything else but 0 ppm on the display. But when I check the MAX level, about once a month I find 12 ppm. I reset it and it stays at 0 for another month or two.

I assume the CO level was indeed ~12 ppm for a short time, since the alarm didn't go off. I understand it should go off immediately at very high levels (1000 ppm) and after some minutes at lower levels. Short spikes of 10-20 ppm should not trigger it.

But where does CO come from? right now we turned on the heat, so it could come from the furnace. Maybe during the summer it came from dryer (also on gas). There are no other gas appliances on that level, the only other gas appliance is the stove downstairs but it seems the CO should stay low. I will probably buy 2 more alarms like this, one for our bedroom (closer to furnace) and one for downstairs (just in case).

Thoughts? Am I too concerned with these low PPM levels?
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Re: CO alarm (12 ppm)
Posted by: Speedy
Date: November 02, 2015 06:43PM
Kitchen range with natural gas?



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Re: CO alarm (12 ppm)
Posted by: Racer X
Date: November 02, 2015 07:37PM
excessive flatulence?
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Re: CO alarm (12 ppm)
Posted by: space-time
Date: November 02, 2015 07:57PM
Quote
Racer X
excessive flatulence?

could be, those boys are capable of anything!
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Re: CO alarm (12 ppm)
Posted by: billb
Date: November 02, 2015 08:30PM
They' d have to be lighting off the flatulence as CO is usually a component of incomplete combustion. Or playing with torches - like butane soldering irons, etc..


Cleaning supplies, cooking with alcohol can supposedly tricka sensor to indicate a small ppm



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Re: CO alarm (12 ppm)
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: November 03, 2015 07:55AM
There is nothing wrong with an overabundance of caution when it comes to Carbon Monixide. Like many of us, I know people who almost died because an old furnace's combustion chamber cracked and leaked into the air stream.

Get more alarms, and if you have ANY concerns, GET OUT OF THE HOUSE and call an expert !
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Re: CO alarm (12 ppm)
Posted by: davester
Date: November 03, 2015 07:09PM
How old are those boys? After about age 8 I would have been doing whatever it took to try to make that alarm go off.



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