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hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Fritz
Date: December 15, 2015 12:08PM
one of ours has had every medical issue he can.

he's now hyperthyroid. my wife wanted to try the Hills y/d to see if that would help. She's heard good things from a few small animal vets she knows. I think it's a great marketing idea.
Other vets scoff at the concept and results.
The only other real solution is an I 131 injection, which is reliable (apparently) and it ought to be for $1800.

So I called Hills to see about getting a trial can, coz who knows if he'll even touch their dreck. He has passed on the c/d when he had that issue. Nope, only cases and in fact, only cases from anyone. While Hills has a 100% "guarantee" your vet or local store can make their own policy.
Nice.

what bu115h1t. Greed is good.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Pam
Date: December 15, 2015 12:23PM
The author collaborated on Hills special food, along with an expert in endocrinology.

[www.catinfo.org]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/15/2015 12:24PM by Pam.
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Fritz
Date: December 15, 2015 12:28PM
Quote
Pam
The author collaborated on Hills special food, along with an expert in endocrinology.

she did? I don't see that.

I saw this:

"In my strong opinion, Hill's is being very irresponsible when making the recommendation to: "supplement (y/d) with 1 tablespoon of regular cat food (dry or canned) each day to provide additional iodine". Given the wide range of iodine in commercial cat food, this recommendation will not ensure adequate iodine in every healthy cat that may be subjected to y/d as the bulk of their diet."

and even more that follows.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Pam
Date: December 15, 2015 12:49PM
I was referring to this
"Dr. Peterson and I have collaborated recently regarding the new Hill's diet, y/d, and on other general nutrition issues. In combining our individual strengths (Dr. Peterson's background in endocrinology and mine in nutrition), Dr. Peterson has written several very informative blog entries."

They didn't work with Hills, they collaborated on evaluating Hill's special thyroid diet
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Fritz
Date: December 15, 2015 12:50PM
aaahh, gotcha



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: mattkime
Date: December 15, 2015 12:51PM
Quote
Pam
The author collaborated on Hills special food, along with an expert in endocrinology.

[www.catinfo.org]

great info



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Pam
Date: December 15, 2015 12:51PM
In other words you have two experts who agree with you that Hills is full of do do.
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: mattkime
Date: December 15, 2015 01:00PM
imo hills and similar brands are a drain on the cat knowledge economy. they're happy to sell you a solution to a problem you don't have that fails to address needs you're not aware of

but the bags looks sciency so maybe that counts for something.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: December 15, 2015 01:36PM
Fritz, when my Boris was diagnosed as hyperthyroid, the subject of special food was not even mentioned by the vet. Actually two vets: his regular doc, and the vet at the location that does the iodine treatment.

The way it was explained to me is that it's caused by a benign tumor on one or both of kittie's thyroid glands. This causes the thyroid gland to override the pituitary which normally regulates the amount of thyroid hormone produced. So the thyroid glands just keep going and going. As you probably know, hyperthyroidism causes various other health and behavior issues: weight loss, hyperactivity, blood pressure issues, etc.

The treatments discussed were either medication or radioactive iodine, which is by far the more desirable of the two. Medication means giving kitty one or more doses per day for the rest of his life. That by itself is a major drag, and ultimately it will be more expensive than the iodine treatment.

The iodine treatment is actually not that big of a deal. They give kitty a shot and keep him isolated for a few days due to radiation protocols. And you're not supposed to let kitty sleep with you for a week when he gets home, but good luck with that! emoticon_love There'll be a followup blood test after a month or so to measure thyroid levels. If they're down, success! If not, a second treatment might be needed but this is not common. I was told it would be at a significant discount.

Boris gained a little weight after the treatment which is a strong indicator that the treatment worked. He's doing great. At his age (15) though, neither vet thought a second treatment would be cost effective anyway had it been needed.

Depending on where you're located, you might be using one of Radiocat's clinics (love the name). Fortunately for me and Boris, there's a local vet that does this so I didn't have to drive all the way to Phoenix.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: ka jowct
Date: December 15, 2015 01:59PM
What about methimazole? Several of my cats were treated with that medication, which is not expensive. It seems to have a mild taste, because you can crush it and put it in some food they live and they will eat it.
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Fritz
Date: December 15, 2015 02:10PM
webster is 14 or 15 too. The expense for the I131 is insane.
But I'm not in favor of Hills bs neither.

We tried the methimazole or Felimazole last week. He hurled bile, then bile and blood. Done with that poison. We had another cat who was on it as well. He tolerated it, barely.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: $tevie
Date: December 15, 2015 02:23PM
Quote
Uncle Wig
The treatments discussed were either medication or radioactive iodine, which is by far the more desirable of the two. Medication means giving kitty one or more doses per day for the rest of his life.

My sister opted for the radioactive treatment. I remember she had to be careful when cleaning the litterbox. Anyhow, she is very happy that she went that route and would doubtless recommend it were she a forum inhabitant.

PS: I think Hills gives kickbacks to vets. I was told once that I should feed my dog Hills because of a stomach problem he was having. I bought a case like a big sucker. Unsatisfied by the first vet's uncertain diagnosis, I took the dog to a different vet. The dog had whipworm, which obviously isn't cured by feeding certain brands of food. I hate that first vet for a number of reasons but there's one of them.







Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/15/2015 02:23PM by $tevie.
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Fritz
Date: December 15, 2015 02:59PM
our vet is NOT in favor of the Hills food on this one.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: December 15, 2015 04:15PM
Fritz, how healthy is your cat otherwise? You mentioned he's had other health issues. Would you expect he'd go another four years or so if he didn't have the thyroid treatment? If yes, I'd highly recommend doing the radioactive iodine. If not, maybe the medication would be ok.

I don't like thinking about the cost-effectiveness of treating a pets illness but it's a sad reality. In my case, Boris' health suggested he'd be around long enough to make it worthwhile to treat his thyroid. And I had the cash available to afford it (about $1600 for me including a couple of blood tests) so I can rationalize it as $400/year, should he live that long, and tha's a cost I'm more than happy to pay. The followup blood results showed his thyroid level still a little high, but given his age and the fact that some cats have higher levels than others, and levels vary a little even across hours, and his age, the vet and I agreed that a second treatment wouldn't be worth the money. So far that looks to be a good choice.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: December 15, 2015 05:22PM
All I can say is good luck with the kitty and I hope he feels better. Making health decisions for our pets is hard... especially as ours age.

We have an ancient Pomeranian (20 years old !) who we don't take to the vet any more.. she's lived a crazy long life, and whenever her time comes, that's her time. She keeps having little strokes every now and then, and then perks up after a day or so. And the kitten in the house (now a strapping teenage kitteh of perhaps 6 months) keeps her entertained and exercised.
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Onamuji
Date: December 15, 2015 05:35PM
Quote
Fritz
webster is 14 or 15 too. The expense for the I131 is insane.
But I'm not in favor of Hills bs neither.

We tried the methimazole or Felimazole last week. He hurled bile, then bile and blood.

Suspect that was NOT felimazole. The latter is coated for easier swallowing and digestion.

Pilled my cat twice a day for the last 4 years of her life.

Gave her a treat after each one for the first week and she made no fuss about swallowing them thereafter.

She never threw it up. Spat it up a few times if I didn't hit the back of her throat when I stuck it in. Never any sign that she had an upset belly from it.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: ka jowct
Date: December 15, 2015 08:25PM
I've never seen a reaction like that to methimazole. Maybe there was something else going on?
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Fritz
Date: December 15, 2015 08:27PM
maybe, but we're done with it.
since the other cat only barely tolerated and the stuff is poison, we have to move onto other options.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Onamuji
Date: December 16, 2015 12:18AM
Quote
ka jowct
I've never seen a reaction like that to methimazole. Maybe there was something else going on?

It may not have been the drug per se.

One effect from an advanced thyroid condition is vomiting.

If the cat is losing weight rapidly and can't keep stuff down then felimazole may be the only way to get it under control short of the radiation... and radiation may not be do-able until it's under control.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Fritz
Date: December 16, 2015 07:31AM
nope, off the Felimazole for a couple days. eating voraciously again.
done lots of reading. Felimazole is very hit and miss for a small number of cats with nothing else going on (at least that shows up).



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: vicrock
Date: December 16, 2015 07:33AM
If the cat is in relatively good health otherwise, I'd go with the iodine treatment - long term it is the best option.

Thumbs down on the special diet.
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Fritz
Date: December 16, 2015 07:35AM
I'm very much for the iodine treatment. Just need to convince, though she is pretty close, my wife.



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: Uncle Wig
Date: December 16, 2015 09:55AM
Quote
Fritz
I'm very much for the iodine treatment. Just need to convince, though she is pretty close, my wife.

You'll get to make all the jokes about Radioactive Kitty that glows in the dark, and/or grows to gigantic size & ravages the neighborhood!



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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: abevilac
Date: December 16, 2015 01:35PM
Many years ago, our Shadow got this diagnosis. At first we treated her w/ something [sorry, I can't remember the name] which had to be formulated at a compounding pharmacy and rubbed to the inside of her ear once a day or was it once a week [again, sorry]. It worked well and was well tolerated but then we decided to go to RadioCat and after that she no longer needed the meds at all.
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: bruceko
Date: December 16, 2015 03:17PM
describes one of our cats perfectly.
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Re: hyperthyroid cat
Posted by: ka jowct
Date: December 19, 2015 02:00PM
Quote
abevilac
Many years ago, our Shadow got this diagnosis. At first we treated her w/ something [sorry, I can't remember the name] which had to be formulated at a compounding pharmacy and rubbed to the inside of her ear once a day or was it once a week [again, sorry]. It worked well and was well tolerated but then we decided to go to RadioCat and after that she no longer needed the meds at all.

A number of meds can be compounded for transdermal administration, and it can be a wonderful solution for cats with sensitive digestive systems or that are very difficult to medicate orally. In my experience, some cats are even far better with injections, especially subcutaneous, than they are with having a pill gotten into them.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/19/2015 02:01PM by ka jowct.
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