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Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: April 18, 2016 11:10AM
Poll
When describing the elimination of funding for a project, would you say:
This poll has expired. Voting is no longer possible.
80 votes were received.
The money is drying up. 78
 
98%
The money is drying out. 2
 
2%



Prompted by a radio news report.



Which would you likely use?
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: ka jowct
Date: April 18, 2016 11:42AM
"Drying up" implies that money will be scarce or not available at all. Drying out suggests that you left your wallet in your pants when you threw them in the washing machine.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: Speedy
Date: April 18, 2016 12:24PM
[www.npr.org]?

"As laptops become smaller and more ubiquitous, and with the advent of tablets, the idea of taking notes by hand just seems old-fashioned to many students today. Typing your notes is faster — which comes in handy when there's a lot of information to take down. But it turns out there are still advantages to doing things the old-fashioned way."



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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: blooz
Date: April 18, 2016 12:47PM
I would say "Funds are becoming scarce."



And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: BernDog
Date: April 18, 2016 01:32PM
Quote
ka jowct
"Drying up" implies that money will be scarce or not available at all. Drying out suggests that you left your wallet in your pants when you threw them in the washing machine.

agree smiley

That said, I think I'd find a different wording entirely, like Blooz.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: Janit
Date: April 18, 2016 01:37PM
It depends very much on the circumstances and implications. What is the nature of the elimination?

1) if pre-existing funding is being revoked: you are losing your funding.

2) If you are close to the end of your money and there will be no more: money is running out.

2) If it is time to apply for a new grant or appropriation, but there are no new funds to apply for: funding for this kind of project is drying up or has dried up.

The idiom "drying up" comes from a metaphor for water flow, as in the river is drying up. Other related metaphors would be running out, evaporating, pulling the plug, etc, each with a slightly different meaning.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/18/2016 01:43PM by Janit.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: billb
Date: April 18, 2016 01:37PM
The money is Bloozing.

Sounds so hip.



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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: April 18, 2016 02:46PM
Apparently the kidz these days say "We broke AF."
Source: My 18 year old.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: April 18, 2016 03:04PM
I would say "Funds are becoming scarce."

Not applicable if someone is talking about their wallet, as in my 'Phone is drying out, in bag of silica gel.

So, what ka and Janit said.


Apparently the kidz these days say "We broke AF."

POMTL!






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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: DP
Date: April 18, 2016 04:55PM
Apparently the kidz these days say "We broke AF."

Man, I'm really old. No clue what this means...





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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: billb
Date: April 18, 2016 05:00PM
Quote
DP
Apparently the kidz these days say "We broke AF."

Man, I'm really old. No clue what this means...
broke as kcuf



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The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: April 18, 2016 05:01PM
Quote
DP
Apparently the kidz these days say "We broke AF."

Man, I'm really old. No clue what this means...

"We broke as f**k."



It is what it is.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: $tevie
Date: April 18, 2016 05:50PM
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Quote
DP
Apparently the kidz these days say "We broke AF."

Man, I'm really old. No clue what this means...

"We broke as f**k."

Thank you. I didn't know what that meant, either.



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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: GuyGene
Date: April 18, 2016 06:00PM
Up.



That old man - he don't think like no old man...
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: tenders
Date: April 18, 2016 06:18PM
It means "We are very much out of money."

Some current slang removes the "be" verb:

"We broke" = we are without funds
"You ugly" = you resemble the latter half of a variety of mammals
"They wasted" = they are drunk

"AF" is an adverbial abbreviation placed, somewhat unusually for English, AFTER the adjective it modifies.

"We broke AF" = we are really without funds
"You ugly AF" = you resemble the latter half of a small subset of barnyard animals
"They wasted AF" = they have been drinking slivovitz for even longer than it takes Winston's main Mac running OS X 10.4.3 to boot

HTH-AF
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: Lew Zealand
Date: April 18, 2016 06:50PM
Thanks for the edumafication. That 'AF' is the first acronym I haven't been able to guess in a while. Gettin' old.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: Buzz
Date: April 18, 2016 07:42PM
I would say, "...better start getting your resumé updated."
==
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: April 18, 2016 07:54PM
Quote
tenders
It means "We are very much out of money."

Some current slang removes the "be" verb:

"We broke" = we are without funds
"You ugly" = you resemble the latter half of a variety of mammals
"They wasted" = they are drunk

"AF" is an adverbial abbreviation placed, somewhat unusually for English, AFTER the adjective it modifies.

"We broke AF" = we are really without funds
"You ugly AF" = you resemble the latter half of a small subset of barnyard animals
"They wasted AF" = they have been drinking slivovitz for even longer than it takes Winston's main Mac running OS X 10.4.3 to boot

HTH-AF

Well played, sir!



It is what it is.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: April 18, 2016 07:55PM
Quote
$tevie
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Quote
DP
Apparently the kidz these days say "We broke AF."

Man, I'm really old. No clue what this means...

"We broke as f**k."

Thank you. I didn't know what that meant, either.

So I can assume only one of us has teen-aged nephews? :-)



It is what it is.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: davester
Date: April 18, 2016 08:29PM
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Quote
tenders
It means "We are very much out of money."

Some current slang removes the "be" verb:

"We broke" = we are without funds
"You ugly" = you resemble the latter half of a variety of mammals
"They wasted" = they are drunk

"AF" is an adverbial abbreviation placed, somewhat unusually for English, AFTER the adjective it modifies.

"We broke AF" = we are really without funds
"You ugly AF" = you resemble the latter half of a small subset of barnyard animals
"They wasted AF" = they have been drinking slivovitz for even longer than it takes Winston's main Mac running OS X 10.4.3 to boot

HTH-AF

Well played, sir!

Nicely done!



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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: jdc
Date: April 18, 2016 10:10PM
cicadas gonna be loud AF.

In Cali, so dont give AF.





Edited 999 time(s). Last edit at 12:08PM by jdc.
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Re: Trivial English usage survey
Posted by: Rick-o
Date: April 20, 2016 12:08PM
I always thought AF meant Midway Island in Japanese code. dunno smiley



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