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Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: Dennis S
Date: July 07, 2016 02:15PM
I brined some sirloin pork chops and they turned out great. But I have a problem of just winging it with the salt and time. I know the net explains how much salt per volume of water but I don't measure the water. I just use enough to cover the meat. Does anyone have a foolproof simple method?
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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: July 07, 2016 02:18PM
.....yes, great for stuff like turkey, pork, etc. that you don't want dry....I believe the ratio is 1 cup of salt: 1 gallon water but I'm sure the ratio varies.....



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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: sekker
Date: July 07, 2016 02:23PM
Love brining turkey.
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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: Ombligo
Date: July 07, 2016 02:26PM
Don't wet brine steaks, dry brine them. Start with 1"+ quality steak, liberally coat it with kosher salt, put on a rack in your refrigerator uncovered for three days. It is a home doable dry-aging technique. it will draw out some juice, thus intensifying the flavor. It will also tenderize as the natural enzymes will be breaking down the fibers. Don't freak if it starts looking like old, dried shoe leather - it is supposed too. It will grill up fine (plus it will be very dry on the outside, allowing for a great crust)

As for brining, I do it all the time with poultry and pork. I never bother with the measures, just make up a add a third-cup of salt to a quart of water, toss in a bay leaf, some procures, maybe a clove, add some garlic.. boil for 10 minutes, add another quart of ice water to cool it off. Then brine away. (obviously you need more of everything to do a turkey).



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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/07/2016 02:28PM by Ombligo.
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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: 3d
Date: July 07, 2016 02:55PM
Quote
Ombligo
Don't wet brine steaks, dry brine them. Start with 1"+ quality steak, liberally coat it with kosher salt, put on a rack in your refrigerator uncovered for three days. It is a home doable dry-aging technique. it will draw out some juice, thus intensifying the flavor. It will also tenderize as the natural enzymes will be breaking down the fibers. Don't freak if it starts looking like old, dried shoe leather - it is supposed too. It will grill up fine (plus it will be very dry on the outside, allowing for a great crust)

Do you rinse the salt off after 3 days? I ask because won't the water rinse negate the dryness on the surface? Also why specifically kosher salt?
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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: billb
Date: July 07, 2016 03:30PM
Quote
3d
Quote
Ombligo
Don't wet brine steaks, dry brine them. Start with 1"+ quality steak, liberally coat it with kosher salt, put on a rack in your refrigerator uncovered for three days. It is a home doable dry-aging technique. it will draw out some juice, thus intensifying the flavor. It will also tenderize as the natural enzymes will be breaking down the fibers. Don't freak if it starts looking like old, dried shoe leather - it is supposed too. It will grill up fine (plus it will be very dry on the outside, allowing for a great crust)

Do you rinse the salt off after 3 days? I ask because won't the water rinse negate the dryness on the surface? Also why specifically kosher salt?

when to use table salt, sea salt, kosher salt:
[www.seriouseats.com]

they don't touch on pickling salt which has no iodine or caking agents which is fairly close to kosher salt in density although kosher salt can have anti-caking agent
with varying densities with types of salt ( which is a line of defense against botulism ) it's too easy to not have enough salt by measure ( not accounting for density ) and end up with angry pickles.



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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: davemchine
Date: July 07, 2016 03:48PM
We brined the turkey last thanksgiving and it was the best turkey we've ever had. I'm a big fan now.
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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: 3d
Date: July 07, 2016 03:53PM
Quote
billb
Quote
3d
Quote
Ombligo
Don't wet brine steaks, dry brine them. Start with 1"+ quality steak, liberally coat it with kosher salt, put on a rack in your refrigerator uncovered for three days. It is a home doable dry-aging technique. it will draw out some juice, thus intensifying the flavor. It will also tenderize as the natural enzymes will be breaking down the fibers. Don't freak if it starts looking like old, dried shoe leather - it is supposed too. It will grill up fine (plus it will be very dry on the outside, allowing for a great crust)

Do you rinse the salt off after 3 days? I ask because won't the water rinse negate the dryness on the surface? Also why specifically kosher salt?

when to use table salt, sea salt, kosher salt:
[www.seriouseats.com]

they don't touch on pickling salt which has no iodine or caking agents which is fairly close to kosher salt in density although kosher salt can have anti-caking agent
with varying densities with types of salt ( which is a line of defense against botulism ) it's too easy to not have enough salt by measure ( not accounting for density ) and end up with angry pickles.

Ahhh... ok. So kosher salt is suggested because the "large grains make it more effective at drawing out liquid from meat". But how do I get the salt coating off before grilling while maintaining the surface dryness for a crust? The salt isn't just left on is it?!
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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: billb
Date: July 07, 2016 04:33PM
Quote
3d
Quote
billb
Quote
3d
Quote
Ombligo
Don't wet brine steaks, dry brine them. Start with 1"+ quality steak, liberally coat it with kosher salt, put on a rack in your refrigerator uncovered for three days. It is a home doable dry-aging technique. it will draw out some juice, thus intensifying the flavor. It will also tenderize as the natural enzymes will be breaking down the fibers. Don't freak if it starts looking like old, dried shoe leather - it is supposed too. It will grill up fine (plus it will be very dry on the outside, allowing for a great crust)

Do you rinse the salt off after 3 days? I ask because won't the water rinse negate the dryness on the surface? Also why specifically kosher salt?

when to use table salt, sea salt, kosher salt:
[www.seriouseats.com]

they don't touch on pickling salt which has no iodine or caking agents which is fairly close to kosher salt in density although kosher salt can have anti-caking agent
with varying densities with types of salt ( which is a line of defense against botulism ) it's too easy to not have enough salt by measure ( not accounting for density ) and end up with angry pickles.

Ahhh... ok. So kosher salt is suggested because the "large grains make it more effective at drawing out liquid from meat". But how do I get the salt coating off before grilling while maintaining the surface dryness for a crust? The salt isn't just left on is it?!

You salt the surface so it holds the juices longer while cooking.
If you were to side by side broil identical cuts of steak one with, one without salt, theoretically the one you salted should end up with more juices on your plate when you cut it.


Salt also makes the meat more flavorful, as it does with everything. Yu probably would'[t eat a potato chip if it had no salt on the surface.



The Phorum Wall keeps us safe from illegal characters and words
The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: Ombligo
Date: July 07, 2016 04:42PM
There won't be any salt to wash off, it will be drawn into the meat. I was real leery of doing this method because I do not like a great deal of salt. I was really worried that it was going to ruin the meat for me. I put about five times the amount of salt I would normally use, and it turned out great.

I went a bit lighter than what is shown here -


I'm the first to admit that this went against my instincts, but I'm glad I tried it. I will be doing it whenever I'm grilling steaks.



“No persons are more frequently wrong, than those who will not admit they are wrong.”
-- François de La Rochefoucauld

Growing older is mandatory. Growing up is optional.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/07/2016 04:45PM by Ombligo.
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Re: Any cooks here big fans of brining?
Posted by: Jack D.
Date: July 07, 2016 06:31PM
Here's a short YouTube video from Chef John of Food Wishes that covers the Difference Between Table Salt & Kosher Salt in Recipes If you go to his channel and search for 'brine' there are dozens of recipes that come up. Worth checking out.



- Jack D.




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