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Power Nailers
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 17, 2017 06:15PM
I want to replace the Baseboard Molding sometime this Summer, it is old, has been painted and scratched and repainted, it just looks ugly. I have a Compound Miter Saw which I think can be used to cut the parts I need. Now I read online and I think I need a Power Nailers. I don't have a compressor and I don't want to rent one since this will be a slow project done over several days, one room at a time, so it will take a while.

I took a quick look at Amazon and it seems they make battery operated Power Nailers. Are these good? once I saw a handyman using something that took copressed air (CO2?) cartridges. Are those better? what do you guys think? I already have some Bosch and Craftsman power tools, so perhaps I should look for those brands to be able to share batteries.

Any comments/thoughts are appreciated.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 17, 2017 06:16PM
Oh yeah, can't wait to see Newt's jokes on this subject smiling smiley
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: freeradical
Date: March 17, 2017 06:25PM
Everything you need to know about nailguns:

[www.youtube.com]
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: Racer X
Date: March 17, 2017 06:29PM
Hey! That was my nickname in college.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: S. Pupp
Date: March 17, 2017 06:58PM
You don't have to spend a fortune for a compressor if it's just for a nail gun.
About four years ago, I bought both a 5 gallon oil-less air compressor from and an 18 gauge brad gun for under $100 total (Northern Tools). They've worked very well. The compressor takes up a lot more space in the garage than a battery powered nail gun, though.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: March 17, 2017 07:05PM
I've been happily using Paslode nailers for a long time..

Some hatem, some lovem. I lovem.

I have the Framing nailer and the finish/trim nailer.

that's all i got..
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 17, 2017 07:12PM
Quote
Kraniac
...
I have the Framing nailer and the finish/trim nailer.

...

so I guess for my application I need a finish/trim nailer. See, I didn't know they had 2 of these.

What gauge nails should I look for?
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: lost in space
Date: March 17, 2017 07:15PM
+1 for Paslode, though for my and most other people's needs they're overkill. I got them just because they were castoffs from my brother, who worked in construction. I'm sure glad to have them around.

One possibility is to just buy what you need then sell them on CL when you're done.



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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: wurm
Date: March 17, 2017 07:18PM
I bought this one from Amazon (Marketplace) back in August of 2015 for a specific light-duty project and I was very pleased with how well it worked. I already had the Ryobi battery pack for other tools, so it made sense to try it. When I bought it back then, it was $79 and now it's gone up to $114 (different seller, too). But it might be worth considering for a project that doesn't require heavy lifting.

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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: iamrfixit
Date: March 17, 2017 07:18PM
You can buy a battery operated or combination battery/gas fueled nailer and they do work fine, but purchase price and operating cost is substantially more than pneumatic. I would avoid cheap no name brand or chinese tools, you will likely get what you pay for. DeWalt and a few other name brands build quality cordless tools and have many styles of cordless nailers for all your fastening needs.

In contrast you can usually buy a small pancake compressor and nailer for less money. Here is decent setup with a couple nailers and a stapler. This would be adequate for most trim installation and many other projects. The small compressor is plenty powerful for running a nailer, even a large framing nailer or for putting air in an occasional tire. A pancake compressor is designed for this particular task, but it will not have nearly enough capacity for running other pneumatic tools like impacts, sanders or grinders.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: Rick-o
Date: March 17, 2017 07:43PM
Big Paslode fan here, but as others have said, expensive for your application.

I like the idea of reselling on CL once your needs are fulfilled.



Mr. Lahey: A lot of people, don’t know how to drink. They drink against the grain of the liquor. And when you drink against the grain of the liquor? You lose.

Randy: What the @#$%& are you talking about?
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: John B.
Date: March 17, 2017 07:55PM
I have a Paslode cordless framing nailer and trim nailer as well. Really convenient for small/medium jobs. Also be aware that the fuel cartridges have a dated shelf life, even if not opened, and a shorter life once opened...so for the casual user, a fuel cartridge is going to last a job, not the number of nails it's rated to fire. And you'll have to replace the batteries every few years, whether you use them or not.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: March 17, 2017 08:43PM
Quote
space-time
Quote
Kraniac
...
I have the Framing nailer and the finish/trim nailer.

...

so I guess for my application I need a finish/trim nailer. See, I didn't know they had 2 of these.

What gauge nails should I look for?

SPAce,

My trim nailer is the IM250A and it's a 16 gauge nailer. I love both machines but I really love the trim nailer

The Framing nailer is an older model# IMCT

Also, John B's comment is correct on all counts RE his comments on fuel cartridges and batteries.

Depending on your usage these machines require a cleaning program every once in a while..no biggy for me.

And yes to the suggestion of using whatever you buy if it's for a few upcoming projects and then re selling on Craigslist.

ALso..if you've never used one of these...there are places where it's appropriate and places where it ain't. Sloppy work can be a result of using nail guns..I see it everywhere..people just hack stuff with them..lots of fun to go around blasting nails into stuff..takes a bit a of care and discipline to learn when to use and when to put it down and break out a trim hammer and nail or some finish screws..



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/17/2017 08:47PM by Kraniac.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: MikeF
Date: March 18, 2017 01:34AM
Just remember -- baseboard is coped in the corners, not mitered.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 18, 2017 03:40AM
Quote
MikeF
Just remember -- baseboard is coped in the corners, not mitered.

Thanks, I had no idea, so I found a video that explain this. I need to think take a closer look at baseboard to see if it is like this or just mitered. I hope to keep the project as simple as possible

EDIT: this video show how to cut it if the angle is not 90 deg

[www.youtube.com]

and I have a miter saw that goes both ways (left-right), so I wonder if I really need to cope it or if I can just cut the angles carefully

here is the saw I got









Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/18/2017 03:52AM by space-time.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: JoeH
Date: March 18, 2017 08:20AM
If your inside corners are exactly 90 degrees, then you might be able to get by with miter cutting. But they rarely are, so I would suggest you learn coping. Otherwise the joint will never look right.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: Yoyodyne ArtWorks
Date: March 18, 2017 08:22AM
Quote
Racer X
Hey! That was my nickname in college.

That's pretty freaky, I had that exact same thought when I saw this thread title. Warped minds think alike!



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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: March 18, 2017 08:35AM
As for Cope vs Miter.

My rule is if the trim is getting painted i miter it..if it's getting stain, i cope it.

if you first stick a small framing square in the corner you can get a very reasonable idea on what's about to happen with your cuts. it's useful to have a visual for me
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: March 18, 2017 09:21AM
Coping results in tighter joints if done correctly. Practice on a few scraps first. it really isn't too tough to do.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 18, 2017 10:11AM
Quote
macphanatic
Coping results in tighter joints if done correctly. Practice on a few scraps first. it really isn't too tough to do.

but is it really necessary? if you can adjust the angles of the miter saw correctly, wouldn't that be better than coping with a handsaw where you don't have precise control over the cut?
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: JoeH
Date: March 18, 2017 10:21AM
Properly done a coped joint has a slight relief behind where the edge of the coped piece contacts the other section of molding. That will fit tighter than two miter cut pieces of molding. As for getting the angles on the miter "just right", it is much more difficult in practice than it sounds.

It is even more difficult on an inside corner at a ceiling or floor. There all angles might not be square, and it is very difficult to compensate for being out of square in two different directions at once when setting up the cut.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: billb
Date: March 18, 2017 10:27AM
Quote
space-time
Quote
macphanatic
Coping results in tighter joints if done correctly. Practice on a few scraps first. it really isn't too tough to do.

but is it really necessary? if you can adjust the angles of the miter saw correctly, wouldn't that be better than coping with a handsaw where you don't have precise control over the cut?
That still assumes you have a square corner to work with.
Most drywall corners are not.
You could always rasp the back sides of the trim boards to match the usually quite rounded and tapered inside corner.

As stated above, paint can hide a bit of putty and imperfection..


Stick a square in a corner and shine a light against the wall to see make shadows and expose all the mud imperfections.



The Phorum Wall keeps us safe from illegal characters and words
The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
BOYCOTT YOPLAIT [www.noyoplait.com]
[soundcloud.com]




Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 03/18/2017 10:29AM by billb.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: space-time
Date: March 18, 2017 01:54PM
Thanks guys for cutting off my enthusiasm for this job. now I am NOT looking forward to it. In fact I didn't even mention this idea to wife, so I will probably keep it quiet. I am sure she would love it if done properly, but until she starts asking for it, maybe I should keep my mouth shut smiling smiley
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: billb
Date: March 19, 2017 12:15PM
Have you tried bleach ?



The Phorum Wall keeps us safe from illegal characters and words
The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is the knowledge of one's own ignorance. -Benjamin Franklin
BOYCOTT YOPLAIT [www.noyoplait.com]
[soundcloud.com]
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: Racer X
Date: March 20, 2017 01:18AM
Quote
Yoyodyne ArtWorks
Quote
Racer X
Hey! That was my nickname in college.

That's pretty freaky, I had that exact same thought when I saw this thread title. Warped minds think alike!

I'm very gratified that my rep extended to your alma mater.
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Re: Power Nailers
Posted by: Carm
Date: March 20, 2017 01:44PM
Recommend a 16 gauge nailer with 1.5 - 2.5 nail. Depending on the baseboard material thickness and wall thickness. Old plaster lath vs drywall sheet.

I have an oil air compressor. I use it for various jobs around the house including tire inflating and most recently, drywall repair. Orange peel spraying after repair. Also to dust out the old computer every so often.
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