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Incendescent Load vs Resistive Load
Posted by: space-time
Date: November 27, 2018 07:31AM
Incandescent means old style light bulbs, right? I would imagine the power factor of those is close to 1.0 since there is no capacitors or coils.

But this picture seems to imply that this device will support up to 1200 W incandescent, and resistive loads with PF more than 0.8 can ho as high as 1920W

why can't incandescent load go more than 1200W? Thanks

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Re: Incendescent Load vs Resistive Load
Posted by: OWC Jamie
Date: November 27, 2018 07:43AM
Hi,

Because the maximum continuous load on a 15A circuit breaker is permitted to be 80%
(12 amps) of the rating, which prevents unnecessary power interruptions caused by
operation too close to 100% capacity.

That's part of the National Electrical Code.

1200W = 12A.



Good Luck!
Jamie Dresser
Other World Computing
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Re: Incendescent Load vs Resistive Load
Posted by: Acer
Date: November 27, 2018 08:03AM
Quote
OWC Jamie
1200W = 12A.

*eyes narrow suspiciously*
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Re: Incendescent Load vs Resistive Load
Posted by: OWC Jamie
Date: November 27, 2018 08:07AM
Quote
Acer
Quote
OWC Jamie
1200W = 12A.

*eyes narrow suspiciously*

OK yep you got me it's too early in the morning. 10A. As long as we're talking about 120V at least. smiling smiley

But notice on the device photo above it says PF 0.8 = same thing, reduce max load by 20% per NEC requirement. smiling smiley



Good Luck!
Jamie Dresser
Other World Computing



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/27/2018 08:08AM by OWC Jamie.
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Re: Incendescent Load vs Resistive Load
Posted by: space-time
Date: November 27, 2018 09:18AM
So I can plug in a space heater 1800W resistive load, but I cannot run 18 lightbulbs 100W each?

That is my question.

EDIT: OK someone sent me a PM that explains it... I don't know why I didn't think of this myself, probably not enough coffee yet. Same as Jamie.

Incandescents have an interesting variable Resistance characteristic as well. A 100 Watt Bulb has about 144 Ohms when hot, but less than 10 Ohms when cold. So fixtures have to be designed to handle the Inrush Current for the time it takes the lamp to reach full temperature.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/27/2018 09:23AM by space-time.
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