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Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: samintx
Date: January 21, 2007 06:19AM
[tech.yahoo.com]


[tech.yahoo.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/21/2007 06:21AM by samintx.
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: Tofer
Date: January 21, 2007 06:59AM
I have to remember at least six different passwords for the Navy Reserve computer systems. They have to be changed regularly (every few months, generally), and they must include 2 lowercase letters, 2 uppercase letters, and two symbols. It's a PITA keeping them all straight, so I end up writing down a quasi-encrypted version in various places. The whole thing is pretty stupid.

-Tofer
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: SteveJobs
Date: January 21, 2007 07:35AM
I use SplashID, synced with my Mac, to store/encrypt all of my passwords. I have a couple hundred - mostly for work, since I have access to 10,000 computers/desktops/servers/etc.

[www.splashdata.com]



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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: JoeM
Date: January 21, 2007 07:51AM
Quote
SteveJobs
I use SplashID, synced with my Mac, to store/encrypt all of my passwords. I have a couple hundred - mostly for work, since I have access to 10,000 computers/desktops/servers/etc.

[www.splashdata.com]

SteveJobs:

I'd be more afraid that I'd loose my PDA out in public. Do you know how safe splashdata is if that happens?



JoeM
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: SteveJobs
Date: January 21, 2007 08:09AM
it has its own password, plus the password of the Palm OS Device.

It's 256-bit encrypted.

[www.splashdata.com]

[en.wikipedia.org])



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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/21/2007 08:10AM by SteveJobs.
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: JoeM
Date: January 21, 2007 08:16AM
Cool, thanks!



JoeM
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: Kraniac
Date: January 21, 2007 11:21AM
there are two that work with almost everything I've tried them on: ******* or: .........
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: microchip13
Date: January 21, 2007 12:00PM
Anything can be hacked.


That is good advice, though.



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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: space-time
Date: January 21, 2007 12:22PM
Quote
microchip13
Anything can be hacked.

Wrong.
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: mrlynn
Date: January 21, 2007 02:35PM
Quote
space-time
Quote
microchip13
Anything can be hacked.

Wrong.

OK, if your password database is protected by a nothing but a password, what is to prevent someone with access to your machine from simply running all possible combinations of typeable characters in ascending order (n, n+1, etc.) until they hit upon the one you used?

Everyone says to avoid names and dictionary words, but combinations of letters, numbers, and symbols are just like dictionary words to a computer.

I'd like a way to store passwords on my computer, but have never gotten past this question.

Of course, if a hacker gets in far enough to install a keystroke-recording program, all he has to do is find out what you typed.

/Mr Lynn



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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: space-time
Date: January 21, 2007 03:48PM
Quote
mrlynn
Quote
space-time
Quote
microchip13
Anything can be hacked.

Wrong.

OK, if your password database is protected by a nothing but a password, what is to prevent someone with access to your machine from simply running all possible combinations of typeable characters in ascending order (n, n+1, etc.) until they hit upon the one you used?

Everyone says to avoid names and dictionary words, but combinations of letters, numbers, and symbols are just like dictionary words to a computer.

I'd like a way to store passwords on my computer, but have never gotten past this question.

Of course, if a hacker gets in far enough to install a keystroke-recording program, all he has to do is find out what you typed.

/Mr Lynn

well, read again what mc13 said and then my reply. I simply stated that "Anything can be hacked" is not TRUE, there are certain things that CANNOT be hacked.

That most passwords can be hacked, maybe, but I didn't say that. All I said is that there ARE some things that cannot be hacked.

I don't want to go into details at this time.
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: Seacrest
Date: January 21, 2007 05:04PM
Quote
mrlynn
OK, if your password database is protected by a nothing but a password, what is to prevent someone with access to your machine from simply running all possible combinations of typeable characters in ascending order (n, n+1, etc.) until they hit upon the one you used?

Because, in practice, it takes a very long time and "oodles" (the technical term for this is aboatload) of computing power to succeed at this type of "brute force" method of attack.
And the longer and more random the password, the difficulty of achieving brute force success increases exponentially.

Theoretically, of course, one could get the password right as easily on the first try as the 10^10th, but that never happens winking smiley,





I am not Ryan Seacrest, and I do not approve this message.
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: mrlynn
Date: January 21, 2007 05:28PM
Quote
Seacrest
[. . . Because, in practice, it takes a very long time and "oodles" (the technical term for this is aboatload) of computing power to succeed at this type of "brute force" method of attack.
And the longer and more random the password, the difficulty of achieving brute force success increases exponentially.

Theoretically, of course, one could get the password right as easily on the first try as the 10^10th, but that never happens winking smiley,

Understood. Next question: Assuming a random sequence of characters, how long a time and how many boatloads of computing power are we talking about for passwords of short-to-modest length? Just roughly, I mean—would you need a supercomputer and a thousand years to crack an 8-character password (the length commonly recommended)? Or a Mac Pro and about 20 minutes?

/Mr Lynn
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Re: Creating a password that can't be hacked
Posted by: Baby Tats
Date: January 21, 2007 08:26PM
I believe encoding via a one-time pad with a face to face key exchange is an unbreakable cipher.

EDIT: Here you go: [en.wikipedia.org]



BT


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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/21/2007 08:28PM by Baby Tats.
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