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Quickie grammar question
Posted by: PeterB
Date: January 20, 2006 09:47PM
"Immune from", or "immune to" ?

As in:

"I hope you can remain fair, and immune (from/to) these sorts of personal attacks."




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/20/2006 09:49PM by PeterB.
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: spearmint
Date: January 20, 2006 09:52PM
to.
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: PeterB
Date: January 20, 2006 09:57PM
minty, rationale?




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: blooz
Date: January 20, 2006 10:04PM
I agree with 'mint.

Something's coming at you, you want to remian immune TO it.

You can be protected FROM something, but that implies an outside force helping in the protecting. When you're immune TO something, that protection comes from within.

That's just my free-form take on this.



And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once.
—Friedrich Nietzsche
Western Massachusetts
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: PeterB
Date: January 20, 2006 10:13PM
Hmmm, I just found this:
[www.ask.com]

which would seem to suggest that it should probably be "to" as you guys are saying; but could also be "from" in that personal attacks are something that most people would be affected by/subject to, and therefore this person is exempt from.




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: Phy
Date: January 20, 2006 10:14PM
You -could- be immune TO measles FROM a prior attack of that disease.

You could be immune TO criticism in this forum if you have suffered FROM it so long that you no longer give a rip.

Or....? (make your own example)
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: rgG
Date: January 20, 2006 10:15PM
to.





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: spearmint
Date: January 20, 2006 10:23PM
I keep thinking something like "I am immune from pencillin" with penicillin having been the reason you are immune.
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: PeterB
Date: January 20, 2006 10:42PM
Minty, right, but...

"immune to penicillin" would be fine if penicillin were like a poison or something

"immune from penicillin" meaning you have immunity owing to having received penicillin; but this isn't really proper English, because you would normally say "immune owing to penicillin" (e.g., not a proper use of "immune") ... in the link I gave above, they cite a legitimate use of "immune from": "he was immune from prosecution", meaning exempt from it.




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: spearmint
Date: January 20, 2006 11:21PM
I got my immunity from penicillin?
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: PeterB
Date: January 21, 2006 12:06AM
Well no, you don't get immunity *from* penicillin, but hopefully you aren't immune *to* it, either! winking smiley




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: spearmint
Date: January 21, 2006 12:50AM
I am holding my hands over my ears, closing my eyes and going "la,la,la,la," to be immune to the criticism.




Da Good Life
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: Pops
Date: January 21, 2006 01:21AM
Either. Or is that either?
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: RgrF
Date: January 21, 2006 03:52AM
Pops Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Either. Or is that either?

or neither: "My pollen immunity stems from sidestepping the grammar police"




"Who's more foolish - the fool or the fool that follows him?" - Obi Wan Kenobi
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: PeterB
Date: January 21, 2006 09:01AM
OK, so it seems the general consensus is "to" ... I'm going with that




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: Quickie grammar question
Posted by: what4
Date: January 21, 2006 09:50AM
Either can be correct. Here are a few examples of each from a Google search. These seem correct to me:


Meaning "not subject to":

immune from prosecution ; immune from libel suits ; immune from the dangers of international terrorism

Meaning "not affected by":

immune to smallpox ; immune to reason; immune to criticism ; immune to the IE virus; immune to evidence





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