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What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: September 02, 2020 05:54PM
Been hearing a few people on TV and the net pronounce words where there is a noun combination but the second letter seems to get pronounced as well. Usually with vowel combos, the first letter of the combo is the dominant sound. I heard a few people on TV read not only the e sound but the a as well. It is subtle and quick but I definitely hear it.

For instance, "Read", has the e taking over the pronunciation of the vowel. I hear the a sound as a super subtle "ad". It is so minor that most people probably don't notice it.

Another instance is "greed" where the first e and second e are pronounced with slightly varying tone. The second e almost sound like a a subtle "uh" sound.

Is this the power of the imagination or is this time kind of regional pronunciation?





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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: September 02, 2020 06:03PM
Got any links where we can hear it ourselves?
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: September 02, 2020 06:04PM
Quote
DeusxMac
Got any links where we can hear it ourselves?


Let me look, sometimes it is in passing when I am not completely paying attention until I hear it. Maybe it is all in the imagination.



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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/02/2020 06:12PM by pRICE cUBE.
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: fauch
Date: September 02, 2020 06:23PM
I know some people from South Jersey pronounce certain words oddly. Like Beer (more like beaer), or Weird (weared) etc.
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: neophyte
Date: September 02, 2020 07:08PM
Perhaps the south, where vowel sounds are sometimes drawn out.

And sometimes a vowel is added:

"One, Two, Tha-ree."
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: PeterB
Date: September 02, 2020 07:15PM
Yes, I too would be interested in hearing this.

I caught something else on this past Sunday morning's political news programs (I don't want this to get political though) -- someone pronouncing anarchist as "A-Narkist" ... I remember thinking to myself, "A-Narkist? Is that like A-Sunkist? Or maybe A-Nalrapist?" grinning smiley




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: RgrF
Date: September 02, 2020 07:22PM
That's not too different than the way some pronounce Los Angeles, for some few people I live in Los Angle-eeeze.
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: Speedy
Date: September 02, 2020 07:44PM
Nukular.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: Z
Date: September 02, 2020 08:05PM
Growing up in Iowa, there were the occasional references to the eye-talians who settled on the south side of Des Moines a hundred years ago or so... but not quite the same as what's being described here. This sounds more like something like a southern drawl... at least in my reading, but I don't know if that's what you're referring to or not, pc.
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: September 02, 2020 10:26PM
.....lingually......this is quite cunning.....



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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: September 02, 2020 10:46PM
Quote
fauch
I know some people from South Jersey pronounce certain words oddly. Like Beer (more like beaer), or Weird (weared) etc.


I believe this is what I am hearing.



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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: PeterB
Date: September 03, 2020 12:06AM
Aaaaaat leaaaast itsssss not vocalll frrrrry. Fryyyyyyy. That's soooooooo annoyingggggg. [www.youtube.com]




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: September 03, 2020 12:35AM
At the 52 second mark, ESPN's Suzy Kolber says "teams" where the letter e and a seem to split and not have the first vowel do the talking. It Sounds like she says "tee-yums" but it happens so quickly. [youtu.be]


I have heard others do this also, not just her. This is the only example I can find that is obvious to me.



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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: Dennis S
Date: September 03, 2020 12:41AM
Speaking of ESPN and sports, almost every announcer and radio talk show host pronounces "tournament" as
"Tu-worn-uh-muhnt."
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: Speedy
Date: September 03, 2020 04:07AM
A diphthong, also known as a gliding vowel, is a combination of two adjacent vowel sounds within the same syllable.[2] Technically, a diphthong is a vowel with two different targets: that is, the tongue (and/or other parts of the speech apparatus) moves during the pronunciation of the vowel. In most varieties of English, the phrase no highway cowboys has five distinct diphthongs, one in every syllable.

Diphthongs contrast with monophthongs, where the tongue or other speech organs do not move and the syllable contains only a single vowel sound. For instance, in English, the word ah is spoken as a monophthong, while the word ow is spoken as a diphthong in most varieties. Where two adjacent vowel sounds occur in different syllables - for example, in the English word re-elect - the result is described as hiatus, not as a diphthong. (The English word hiatus is itself an example of both hiatus and diphthongs.)

Diphthongs often form when separate vowels are run together in rapid speech during a conversation. However, there are also unitary diphthongs, as in the English examples above, which are heard by listeners as single-vowel sounds (phonemes).[3]



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: Dennis S
Date: September 03, 2020 06:48AM
Rather than something regional, I think it may be generational.
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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: September 03, 2020 07:31AM
.....is that different from dipping.....a thong.......??



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Re: What part of the US is the reading every vowel letter combination from?
Posted by: rz
Date: September 03, 2020 11:47AM
Quote
Z
Growing up in Iowa, there were the occasional references to the eye-talians who settled on the south side of Des Moines a hundred years ago or so... but not quite the same as what's being described here. This sounds more like something like a southern drawl... at least in my reading, but I don't know if that's what you're referring to or not, pc.

My FIL does that. He's Polish. I keep wanting to ask him if he's Pee-olish.
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