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More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: deckeda
Date: October 19, 2020 09:15AM
Apparently we’ve been supplying them with food also. The kitchen includes two floor-to-ceiling cabinets. There’s a normal top section and a bottom section (so, 4 cabinets in question. )

They leave the top level cabinets alone. Maybe they can’t get in. The bottom cabinets unfortunately begin at the floor and go 5 ft up. It’s like a mouse apartment. Next up is re-securing the bottom door latches; I suspect they’re walking across the kitchen floor into the cabinet doorway. How they’re on the kitchen floor is another thing to solve.

Yesterday we cleared out the bottom two areas (bottom “shelf” is literally the kitchen floor behind the door) and Great Sealed cracks down there, not that I could tell they went anywhere. The foam appears undisturbed but this morning I saw a couple new poops.

On the other had I could completely tape shut the door for a day or two and learn if that’s the entryway.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: mattkime
Date: October 19, 2020 09:17AM
I'm fighting this battle but they rarely make it up from the basement. I'm quite shocked by how many I've caught since putting out traps. This morning two of my traps are missing - that will be a 'fun' project to resolve.



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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: GGD
Date: October 19, 2020 09:37AM
Quote
mattkime
I'm fighting this battle but they rarely make it up from the basement. I'm quite shocked by how many I've caught since putting out traps. This morning two of my traps are missing - that will be a 'fun' project to resolve.

I tie string to my traps and the other end to something secure. I usually fish them back in.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: ztirffritz
Date: October 19, 2020 09:55AM
harvested two rats over the weekend.



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MacResource User Map: [www.zeemaps.com]#
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: August West
Date: October 19, 2020 09:58AM
Cat



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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: deckeda
Date: October 19, 2020 10:10AM
The basement is our usual source. It’s had so much clutter and crap that keeping them out went neglected. I began slowly a year or so ago with 4 basement traps. Every few months three of them would have occasional random success. In the last few weeks as I’ve focused on sealing basement gaps that should lessen. But the foundation level is tough to manage everywhere.

Upstairs is a hardwood floor, and I can see from the basement that the subfloor has several large gaps. It’s all just rough cut lumber laid down. Usually there’s underlayment but not everywhere, and some areas under the kitchen are missing that. The joys of living in an old house, where pretty much everything was based on old building science, low budgets and “good enough for now” mentality.

I know I have one area in particular to tackle. Meant to do so this past weekend but could not: The dishwasher never had the cabinets enclosed on either side. We fixed one side this spring but the other side is open to a small utility cabinet with electrical running through it. Because the bottom (interior) of the cabinet is higher than the finished floor, there’s a “ledge” with likely an open hole hidden beneath the cabinet. I’ll need to remove the dishwasher to board up and definitively seal that cabinet. We already know that’s been a pathway in the past.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: mattkime
Date: October 19, 2020 10:17AM
Quote
August West
Cat

our cats are old and are either not up to the challenge or disinterested. Its disappointing since at least one of them was a reasonably proficient mouser when he was younger.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: mattkime
Date: October 19, 2020 10:22AM
>But the foundation level is tough to manage everywhere.

We have a door that used to be used for loading coal that should probably be bricked up and filled with cement. Up until now it struck me as a potentially useful spot for passing items to the basement. Its probably more useful for mice.

Other than that, I'm curious if they might be finding gaps in the foundation, just above cinder blocks. I need to come up with a good way to explore this option.

Also, I'm wondering if out compost pile has fueled an increase in vermin. I suspect it was fine until it became cold outside. I suspect I'll get an above ground bin for next year.



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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: ztirffritz
Date: October 19, 2020 10:22AM
The rats I've been collecting are about 1/3-1/2 the size of the average cat.



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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: pdq
Date: October 19, 2020 10:27AM
Quote
mattkime
I'm fighting this battle but they rarely make it up from the basement. I'm quite shocked by how many I've caught since putting out traps. This morning two of my traps are missing - that will be a 'fun' project to resolve.

Eww. I tie a string on my traps for this reason.. Rarely (fortunately!) my old fashioned traps will catch and maim a mouse, yet not kill it, and in such cases, I get a hammer.

I know, sounds horrible. To me too. But I feel like it’s better than having the poor thing die a slow death.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: October 19, 2020 10:33AM
Seemingly every night squirrels take up residence in my car's engine bay.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: deckeda
Date: October 19, 2020 10:46AM
Quote
mattkime
>But the foundation level is tough to manage everywhere.

We have a door that used to be used for loading coal that should probably be bricked up and filled with cement. Up until now it struck me as a potentially useful spot for passing items to the basement. Its probably more useful for mice.

Other than that, I'm curious if they might be finding gaps in the foundation, just above cinder blocks. I need to come up with a good way to explore this option.

Also, I'm wondering if out compost pile has fueled an increase in vermin. I suspect it was fine until it became cold outside. I suspect I'll get an above ground bin for next year.

My inlaws have that old coal door in one house and it was falling off the brick. I should have boarded it up but had a piece of glass custom cut for it and made a wooden “frame” I secured to the brick via little clamp-like brackets that arch over and press the frame to the brick. And then caulked the hell out of it and grouted the glass pane. I’m shocked their lawnmower, or someone’s foot hasn’t yet smashed through it. But it does provide sunshine into the old coal room.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: October 19, 2020 11:15AM
But I feel like it’s better than having the poor thing die a slow death.


I'm not quite that in harmony with the universe.

If it were me in that situation, they'd go down the toilet.




Two for two, I'm good now.

We are a government of laws, not men.

When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

Everybody matters or nobody matters.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men except
by believing all possible evil of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

I *love* SIGs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: deckeda
Date: October 19, 2020 11:21AM
Quote
mattkime
... Other than that, I'm curious if they might be finding gaps in the foundation, just above cinder blocks. I need to come up with a good way to explore this option. ...

As part of my basement air seal project (still ongoing) this is what I'm doing:

1.5" XPS foam into the rim joists, followed by Great Stuff sealer, followed eventually by Roxul (Rockwood) batting, followed by drywall. Maybe.

Here's on example. I've also blocked up old air vents. Again, that is old building science and all it does is draw in moist air and vermin, if you have any sort of HVAC installed. Houses do not/should not "breathe" unless you're totally without HVAC and enjoy cool breezes all winter long.



For a standard cinder block with a ~ 8" depth, the sill plate won't be wide enough to cover the top. In some places the sill plate end could meet the cinder block (convenient, just seal with a thin bead of Great Stuff.) In most areas the sill plate sits more flush to the outside. These gaps at the top can be huge inside the basement or crawlspace.

Sometimes all you need a small secondary section of foam, other times a bigger piece instead laying flat to bridge a bigger gap.

I have more to do ... you can see how open the top of the cinder block is:



On some walls I got lazy and just tried to fill the tops with Great Stuff but of course most of it falls down into the void. A cut piece of XPS foam would not only look nicer but be far easier to seal.

At any rate, that's mainly for leaking air but it's also for vermin walking in.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: rz
Date: October 19, 2020 11:23AM
Haven't seen any rats (or mice) since a couple of feral cats have taken up residence in our yard. We trapped them and had them both fixed, so whenever they eventually pass on, we might see a return.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: Rick-o
Date: October 19, 2020 11:34AM
Heh! I've been dealing with a mouse that's got in over the past few weeks. I was sickly about a week ago and decided to sleep in. I woke up hearing a *bonk* *bonk* noise in my bedroom. I looked over the edge of the bed to see a small mouse with an acorn in its mouth as big as his head, trying to get through a small crack in the closet door. Little bugger couldn't figure out that his acorn wouldn't fit through the crack! I yelled at him, he turned around and did a stare down with me, then went back to work.

I noticed yesterday that my handful of small jelly beans I grab out of a container and keep on my desk to nibble on were gone! No crumbs, but every last bean was gone. Dude is storing goodies for the winter in his nice warm new home!!

I set the live trap this morning, but I have a few snap traps that are going online as soon as I remember where I put them. Haven't used those in a few years, and I may have just thrown them out with the mouse carcass.



Mr. Lahey: A lot of people, don’t know how to drink. They drink against the grain of the liquor. And when you drink against the grain of the liquor? You lose.

Randy: What the @#$%& are you talking about?
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: deckeda
Date: October 19, 2020 11:55AM
Rick that’s funny. I once had one wake me up; it was trying to get into the kitchen from the downstairs stairway. Just kept scratching at the door.

It was very “rap-rap-rapping-at-my-door” Edgar Allen Poe-like.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: mattkime
Date: October 19, 2020 12:35PM
This is my grand entry -



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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: jh
Date: October 19, 2020 12:40PM
My grandmother had old fashioned rat/mouse trap cages she used in her cellar under her house which was built in the late 19th century. When she would catch one she would dispatch it by taking the cage outside and pour boiling water over the critter scalding them to death. Not a pretty site to witness.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: October 19, 2020 01:11PM
Quote
ztirffritz
harvested two rats over the weekend.

Gonna be plenty to eat this winter, Ma! smiley-laughing001



It is what it is.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: October 19, 2020 01:16PM
Quote
deckeda
Upstairs is a hardwood floor, and I can see from the basement that the subfloor has several large gaps. It’s all just rough cut lumber laid down. Usually there’s underlayment but not everywhere, and some areas under the kitchen are missing that. The joys of living in an old house, where pretty much everything was based on old building science, low budgets and “good enough for now” mentality.

Lived in a house some years ago that had wood floors. One year we had a rat infestation which turned out to be due to my roommate keeping massive amounts of uncontainerized bird seed in the garage - like moths to a flame, it was.

Anyway, one night we woke to found that a rat had gnawed through the wood floor in the dining nook to get to a bowl of fruit on the table in the nook. I thought that was very unusual, given how much free food there was for the taking in the relative safety of the garage.



It is what it is.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/19/2020 01:16PM by N-OS X-tasy!.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: October 19, 2020 01:16PM
Quote
pdq
Eww. I tie a string on my traps for this reason.. Rarely (fortunately!) my old fashioned traps will catch and maim a mouse, yet not kill it, and in such cases, I get a hammer.

I know, sounds horrible. To me too. But I feel like it’s better than having the poor thing die a slow death.

When you have a hammer, everything looks like a mouse.



It is what it is.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: October 19, 2020 01:21PM
Quote
rz
Haven't seen any rats (or mice) since a couple of feral cats have taken up residence in our yard. We trapped them and had them both fixed, so whenever they eventually pass on, we might see a return.

Cats are like Doritos - they'll make more. smiling smiley



It is what it is.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: Ammo
Date: October 19, 2020 01:53PM
Not a big surprise, but mice were entering our house where the pipe to the outdoor faucet pipe passed through the siding. Once they got inside the walls, they could scurry up to the kitchen level where the interior water lines passed through the floorboards under the sink. There are adjustable collars of metal or plastic that fit at a right angle to the pipe. They can be ratcheted tightly around the pipe at the point where it passes through the wall to form a barrier that keeps mice out.



Where is there dignity unless there is also honesty? - Cicero

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. —Wendy Mass
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: datbeme
Date: October 19, 2020 11:08PM
This is an occasional problem for us that is usually solved after setting some traps for a couple weeks. I set some traps last week and have caught two little mice so far, but today's catch was a little disturbing.

One little dude had his head in the black plastic trap that was on the top shelf of our basement pantry. But it's the white ventilated metal shelving, and half his body was caught in between the slats hanging below the shelf. These slats are only 1/4"-1/2" apart, so it wasn't easy extricating him from above or below the shelf. I managed to get the job done, but it was not much fun.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: PeterB
Date: October 20, 2020 08:11PM
Firstly, don't blame all rodentia. Not all rodentia are evil. emoticon-animal-022 hamster dance

Second, for those of you who don't have cats or your cats are lackadaisical loafers or hangers-on, you could also always buy some predator urine. I've heard coyote urine works well, but no personal experience. Also, certain cat breeds are definitely better mousers than others. (Mainecoons are very good... growing up as a teen, one of mine cornered a flying squirrel who somehow got into my bedroom when I was sleeping... nothing quite like a cat waking you up at 4AM growling and hissing...)




Freya says, 'Hello from NOLA, baby!' (Laissez bon temps rouler!)
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: pdq
Date: October 20, 2020 10:10PM
Quote
N-OS X-tasy!
Quote
pdq
Eww. I tie a string on my traps for this reason.. Rarely (fortunately!) my old fashioned traps will catch and maim a mouse, yet not kill it, and in such cases, I get a hammer.

I know, sounds horrible. To me too. But I feel like it’s better than having the poor thing die a slow death.

When you have a hammer, everything looks like a mouse.

I guess I deserved that one.
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Re: More rodentia: It’s Fall, and here they come looking for heat.
Posted by: pdq
Date: October 20, 2020 10:13PM
Quote
deckeda
Quote
mattkime
... Other than that, I'm curious if they might be finding gaps in the foundation, just above cinder blocks. I need to come up with a good way to explore this option. ...

As part of my basement air seal project (still ongoing) this is what I'm doing:

1.5" XPS foam into the rim joists, followed by Great Stuff sealer, followed eventually by Roxul (Rockwood) batting, followed by drywall. Maybe.

Here's on example. I've also blocked up old air vents. Again, that is old building science and all it does is draw in moist air and vermin, if you have any sort of HVAC installed. Houses do not/should not "breathe" unless you're totally without HVAC and enjoy cool breezes all winter long.



For a standard cinder block with a ~ 8" depth, the sill plate won't be wide enough to cover the top. In some places the sill plate end could meet the cinder block (convenient, just seal with a thin bead of Great Stuff.) In most areas the sill plate sits more flush to the outside. These gaps at the top can be huge inside the basement or crawlspace.

Sometimes all you need a small secondary section of foam, other times a bigger piece instead laying flat to bridge a bigger gap.

I have more to do ... you can see how open the top of the cinder block is:



On some walls I got lazy and just tried to fill the tops with Great Stuff but of course most of it falls down into the void. A cut piece of XPS foam would not only look nicer but be far easier to seal.

At any rate, that's mainly for leaking air but it's also for vermin walking in.

What makes you think mice can’t chew through foam insulation? Steel wool, man, or sheet metal, unless you’ve got wimpier mice than me.
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