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USDA plant hardiness zone question for forum gardeners
Posted by: steve...
Date: April 05, 2021 11:42PM
I have some trees from a nursery that were gotten with a voucher from the power company when they mistakenly cut down an 18' Redwood in my front yard. I've already planted one of the 6' trees.

I looked up the hardiness zones for the tree type (Steeplechase Arborvitae) and they are for zones 4-8. I live in zone 9b which has warmer winters and cooler summers.

Am I doomed for failure?

TIA




Northern California Coast



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/05/2021 11:49PM by steve....
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Re: USDA plant hardiness zone question for forum gardeners
Posted by: Pat
Date: April 06, 2021 12:21AM
You use HZ to determine if it can withstand your winters. You'll have to look into heat tolerance separately.

Hardiness zones refer to lowest average temp. So while the range you give can give an idea of overall temp range, it's not a true indicator of max temps.
You can have an area with a lower HZ but extremely hot summer. Mojave desert vs Los Angeles. LA has a higher HZ than the desert because of its mild winters while it is regularly below freezing in the Mojave desert in the winter. Come summer time, it's a whole different story sitting in Baker vs Santa Monica.
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Re: USDA plant hardiness zone question for forum gardeners
Posted by: freeradical
Date: April 06, 2021 12:24AM
Just be sure to give it extra water during the summer. You can get watering devices that you penetrate the ground to get to the roots. Use one of these around the drip line of the trees which is where those tiny water absorbing roots are located.

People grow Birch trees here in Sacramento, and we hardly have the climate for them.
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Re: USDA plant hardiness zone question for forum gardeners
Posted by: rgG
Date: April 06, 2021 07:51AM
Usually, not always, nurseries in your area will only sell plants that are ok to plant in your area. If you bought the tree from a local nursery, you should probably be good.
Also, nurseries around here guarantee trees for several years and one has a lifetime guarantee on trees and shrubs, so keep your receipt, just in case.
As was mentioned earlier, since you are a little warm for this tree, make sure it has adequate water in the hotter months.





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: USDA plant hardiness zone question for forum gardeners
Posted by: Acer
Date: April 06, 2021 09:00AM
Arborvitae are hardy, but their native stock (white cedar) came from a plant that likes it cool and damp. I agree with the above that you'll need to pay attention. Consider what you plant it in...don't just dig a hole for the rootball in the dust. I'm thinking extra big hole, with some moisture-friendly amendments.
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Re: USDA plant hardiness zone question for forum gardeners
Posted by: rz
Date: April 06, 2021 09:04AM
I'm guessing you're fine. I live in zone 9, but in Central FL. Our winters are mild (no freeze in 5+ years and counting), but our summers are brutal. Unless the tree you have requires a cool/cold winter in order to flower or grow properly, you should be fine.
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Re: USDA plant hardiness zone question for forum gardeners
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: April 06, 2021 11:33AM
A VOUCHER for a Redwood ? ZOMG...
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Re: USDA plant hardiness zone question for forum gardeners
Posted by: steve...
Date: April 06, 2021 08:02PM
I should have mentioned that my choice of nurseries was limited. I had to use a nursery in the power company's service area that would accept the vouchers. There were only two in my area (zone) and they had very few choices. There were several inland nurseries (zone 8) - I went to the one that seem to have the largest selection of plants.

I talked to the nursery people today and they seem to think the trees would be OK in my zone.

I am still bummed about losing the redwood. There were two and I thought only one had to have the top trimmed. To me, a redwood with the top chopped off IS NOT A REDWOOD! They said they could remove the tree if I wanted and I thought they would leave the other one untouched, to survive another 5 years until the next time they come through to trim trees. I only looked away for about a minute before they had topped the second one and were cutting off limbs.




Northern California Coast
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