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Kosher Salt
Posted by: freeradical
Date: May 04, 2021 11:48AM
So what's the big deal with this, and why do so many online recipes seem to call for it.

It's sodium chloride, right? Or am I missing something here?
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: mattkime
Date: May 04, 2021 11:59AM
It doesn’t have iodine which has a metallic flavor. There’s also a difference in volume which is also true within types of kosher salt.



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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: Buzz
Date: May 04, 2021 12:04PM
Circumcised Salt probably wouldn't sell as well, nor would recipes calling for it be as popular.....
==
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: freeradical
Date: May 04, 2021 12:18PM
Quote
mattkime
It doesn’t have iodine which has a metallic flavor. There’s also a difference in volume which is also true within types of kosher salt.

Iodide is a halogen - just like chloride - , which is about as far from a metal as you can get, so I'm not getting this reference. In any case, you need some iodide in your diet.

I either weigh salt, or just estimate the amount by putting some in the palm of my hand.

I honestly just buy the generic store brand of salt. It's 40 cents instead of the 80 cents that Morton's wants.
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: JoeH
Date: May 04, 2021 12:19PM
Called "Kosher" from its uses in dry brining, but not necessarily "Kosher" to meet religious requirements. Fewer additives and made in larger grains that will stay on the surface of the meat and absorb juices. Depending on the process used to create the large grains of salt, usually less dense than table salt, so measures by volume will need to be increased for recipes.
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: May 04, 2021 12:21PM
.....it makes everything.....taste like chicken......



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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: JoeH
Date: May 04, 2021 12:33PM
Quote
freeradical
Quote
mattkime
It doesn’t have iodine which has a metallic flavor. There’s also a difference in volume which is also true within types of kosher salt.

Iodide is a halogen - just like chloride - , which is about as far from a metal as you can get, so I'm not getting this reference. In any case, you need some iodide in your diet.

Many people claim to be able to taste the difference, most blind tests show this is only detectable by very, very few. Grain size and other additives are more of a contribution to taste. Various iodide and iodate compounds are added in very small amounts, for example it only takes about 2 ounces of potassium iodate to treat a ton of salt.
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: Carnos Jax
Date: May 04, 2021 12:42PM
Quote
freeradical
Quote
mattkime
It doesn’t have iodine which has a metallic flavor. There’s also a difference in volume which is also true within types of kosher salt.

Iodide is a halogen - just like chloride - , which is about as far from a metal as you can get, so I'm not getting this reference. In any case, you need some iodide in your diet.

I either weigh salt, or just estimate the amount by putting some in the palm of my hand.

I honestly just buy the generic store brand of salt. It's 40 cents instead of the 80 cents that Morton's wants.

He didn’t say it was a metal, just that it tastes metallic.
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: May 04, 2021 01:24PM
....what about Kosher Pepper......???



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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 04, 2021 02:08PM
It's called Kosher salt because it is used in koshering meat.

Koshering is the process by which the blood is removed from the flesh of meat and fowl before it is prepared for eating. (eating blood is forbidden by Jewish law)

It is also preferred for cooking because the coarser grains make it easier to distribute the salt over surfaces (as well as being non-iodized for taste preferences)
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: d4
Date: May 04, 2021 02:09PM
From the world wide web:
"Kosher salt has wider, coarser grains vs table salt. The wider grains salt food in a gentler way than table salt. Using kosher salt enhances the flavor of foods instead of making them taste salty. Kosher salt has no iodine, which can lend a bitter taste to foods salted with table salt."

Also,,, if the recipe calls for Kosher salt and all you have is table salt be aware that the measurements are slightly different due to table salt being finer than Kosher salt. So you might want to look that up before proceeding.



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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: wurm
Date: May 04, 2021 03:02PM
Quote
Steve G.
It's called Kosher salt because it is used in koshering meat.

Koshering is the process by which the blood is removed from the flesh of meat and fowl before it is prepared for eating. (eating blood is forbidden by Jewish law)

It is also preferred for cooking because the coarser grains make it easier to distribute the salt over surfaces (as well as being non-iodized for taste preferences)

Thank you. Succinct and factual.
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: Thrift Store Scott
Date: May 04, 2021 04:08PM
Quote
Carnos Jax
Quote
freeradical
Quote
mattkime
It doesn’t have iodine which has a metallic flavor. There’s also a difference in volume which is also true within types of kosher salt.

Iodide is a halogen - just like chloride - , which is about as far from a metal as you can get, so I'm not getting this reference. In any case, you need some iodide in your diet.

I either weigh salt, or just estimate the amount by putting some in the palm of my hand.

I honestly just buy the generic store brand of salt. It's 40 cents instead of the 80 cents that Morton's wants.

He didn’t say it was a metal, just that it tastes metallic.

"Metallic" is one way to describe the difference in taste. I'd have said iodized salt has a much sharper tang to it the instant it touches your tongue whereas kosher salt has a smoother, more subtle flavor. It's not a "night & day" difference, but it IS there, and I can see how kosher salt would integrate better into recipes by not making it obvious salt has been added.

I didn't know it was uncommon for people to be able to taste the difference.



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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: JoeH
Date: May 04, 2021 06:39PM
Quote

I didn't know it was uncommon for people to be able to taste the difference.

Try comparing iodized and non-iodized table salt from the same maker. The different size and shape of the kosher salt crystals affects the taste, so doing a direct comparison is not as easy.

Also, a container of iodized salt that has been open for a while will have less iodine present due to oxidation. They add a small amount of dextrose to slow that down.
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: May 04, 2021 08:11PM
....some think that cilantro taste like soap......some don't smell the stinky pee after eating asparagus.....



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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: May 05, 2021 09:56AM
The different size and shape of the kosher salt crystals affects the taste, so doing a direct comparison is not as easy.


Even though detecting the difference between iodine and no iodine might not be easy, the difference in taste due to the size and shape of kosher salt alone might be worth investigating.

I wonder how it would work/taste on French fries and tater tots.

My former butter choice has been dumped in favor of Kerrygold, maybe Morton's is next.




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Or not...
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: May 05, 2021 10:01AM


How much iodized salt is needed for our RDA?

It seems we get a lot of salt (sodium) in our diets incidentally.

Or I could get a large fry for $1 from McDonald's as my daily supplement.




Two for two, I'm good now.

We are a government of laws, not men.

When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

Everybody matters or nobody matters.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men except
by believing all possible evil of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

-An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

I *love* SIGs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: freeradical
Date: May 05, 2021 01:02PM
Is there such a thing as Halal salt?
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Re: Kosher Salt
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: May 05, 2021 02:06PM
.....something doesn't seem.....Kosher about this.....



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Re: Or not...
Posted by: JoeH
Date: May 05, 2021 07:17PM
Quote
RAMd®d

How much iodized salt is needed for our RDA?

At the levels for iodizing used in the US, a bit over 3 grams of salt a day. That is a bit over half a teaspoon, and about half the sodium recommended as a daily allowance.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/05/2021 07:21PM by JoeH.
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