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“ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: btfc
Date: June 16, 2021 08:33PM
So sad.

[www.sltrib.com]


They should be reprinted.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Lew Zealand
Date: June 16, 2021 08:52PM
Lemme summarize the empty response from the school:

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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Don C
Date: June 16, 2021 09:18PM
Every now and again you think we are making progress toward respect for all and then reality crashes through. Not much diversity in that group. That could be intentional or, being Utah (as I pretend to know it) that's the pool to draw from.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Mr Downtown
Date: June 16, 2021 09:33PM
Well . . . . maybe.

Seems she was an honorary member of the squad. You'll notice she doesn't have a uniform, for instance.

So they took photos both with her and without her. Which one to use in the yearbook? Seems like that could go either way, and no one needs to fire up the Outrage Machine.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: June 16, 2021 09:44PM
Two images were taken. One with the girl, one without. Image on the right was the one used for the yearbook and social media.



[www.sltrib.com]

The cheerleading squad at Shoreline Junior High took two official team portraits this year.

The first photo included Morgyn Arnold, a 14-year-old student with Down syndrome who’d been working as the cheer team manager and knew all the routines by heart. The second photo included all the other girls, but was taken without Arnold, who was noticeably missing from her spot in the front row.

And it was that second picture without her that the school used on social media and in the yearbook.

Jordyn Poll, Arnold’s older sister, said Arnold was heartbroken when she flipped through the pages and saw she wasn’t included with the rest of her teammates. Her name wasn’t even mentioned.

Poll believes the decision was made because of Arnold’s disability.

“She spent hours learning dances, showing up to games, and cheering on her school and friends but was left out,” Poll said in public posts on Facebook and Instagram on Tuesday. “I hope that no one ever has to experience the heartbreak that comes when the person they love comes home from school devastated and shows them that they’re not in the picture with their team.”




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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: btfc
Date: June 16, 2021 10:04PM
My 12 year old friend with Down syndrome, Jude, would be completely devastated if something like this happened to her..


Outrage and empathy are entirely different. Sad that you don’t know the difference
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Speedy
Date: June 16, 2021 10:53PM
She should also have a uniform like the others.

In my children’s old school the cheer squad is pretty meager because the girls go out for sports. My daughter, IQ 62, was a player on the state champion floor hockey team.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Acer
Date: June 16, 2021 11:56PM
Quote
Speedy
She should also have a uniform like the others.

At least give the kid a set of poms fer crying out loud, even if a uniform was not in order.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Rolando
Date: June 16, 2021 11:58PM
That's fcuked up.

Really fcuked up.



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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: June 17, 2021 04:32AM
Cheerleaders associated with a vain and heartless act ? Who woulda thunk it ?
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Sam3
Date: June 17, 2021 05:35AM
Quote
Mr Downtown
Well . . . . maybe.

Seems she was an honorary member of the squad. You'll notice she doesn't have a uniform, for instance.

So they took photos both with her and without her. Which one to use in the yearbook? Seems like that could go either way, and no one needs to fire up the Outrage Machine.

Wow! That's cruel and heartless.

She was NOT an "honorary" member of the team. Did you even bother to read? She was team manager, she knew all of the routines.

Quote
sltrib.com
The first photo included Morgyn Arnold, a 14-year-old student with Down syndrome who’d been working as the cheer team manager and knew all the routines by heart.

Why did they take the second picture, without her, in the first place? Someone didn't like the fact that she's different?

Team managers are part of the team.

NO, it couldn't have gone either way, this is a clear case of discrimination.

And yes, there is every reason to fire up the Outrage Machine.





The arts are not luxuries but assets that give way more than they cost.
--Ronald Tucker on YouTube

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn't work if it is not open.
--Frank Zappa
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: spacescape
Date: June 17, 2021 06:45AM
Unacceptable. Give her a uniform and poms even if she is "unofficial". My son is ASD / Asperger's and has social issues with kids his age. What I'm having problem accepting is the school districts are all pushing accepting the acceptance of transgender / LGBTQ yet they don't seem to have an issue with my son getting teased or left out often. I'm trying to not take it personal... But... I'm totally having a very hard time with this right now and I don't like myself for that. Just hard for me to wrap my head around the "love is love" when they treat my son like @#$%& sometimes. I mean, if love is love then everyone should be treated with kindness.

Sorry for my rant. Poor girl.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: June 17, 2021 08:38AM
A few insights about this area. It is an expanding and fairly new part of Suburban Salt Lake City. It is a fairly affluent area. This land was formerly farm land that was created when the Great Salt Lake receded decades ago. Most of the homes are of recent construction. Many of the newer neighborhoods are bright, shiny, and somewhat homogenous.

As far as the photo goes, I feel some clues about them seem disturbing. Before I continue, I want to emphasize the girls says the others treat her well. I don’t know what that entails exactly. The girl is the team’s Manager that helps with team functions and practices routines with the team. I am unclear what expectations were communicated to the girl and her family. It is common for team photos to include student helpers, managers, and assistants. I would be interested to see how other clubs in the school went about including team managers.

The photo analysis:
1. Two versions exist of the group, one with the girls and one without.
2. An adult or adults made this decision to have two versions.
3. Only the version without the girl made it to social media and the yearbook.
4. According to a report I read, yearbook affiliated people were only given the version without the girl.
5. Facial expressions in the photo with the girl shows 5 of the students not smiling as fully as the image without the girl. As someone that has taken pictures of thousands of people, I know a half baked smile when I see one. It is my speculation that some on the team knew ahead of time that two photos would be taken. Therefore, did not give their best effort. It is my conclusion that the girls took the lead of the adults in knowing “this one doesn’t count”. At least 5 of those faces say it all IMHO. I could be wrong and the photographer took a shot when all weren’t ready. Typically with cheer/pep people I have taken pictures of, didn’t need to much effort to elicit a beaming, “Ready for my closeup” smile.





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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: S. Pupp
Date: June 17, 2021 09:08AM
I sympathize with her. It feels lousy to be excluded. As the only half-Asian student in my rural PA school, I was excluded entirely from my freshman yearbook. Well, not exactly; you can see 1/2 an inch of the side of my head in the one photo; they had me stand behind someone taller than I was. I'm not named in the photo.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: spacescape
Date: June 17, 2021 09:28AM
Quote
pRICE cUBE
A few insights about this area. It is an expanding and fairly new part of Suburban Salt Lake City. It is a fairly affluent area. This land was formerly farm land that was created when the Great Salt Lake receded decades ago. Most of the homes are of recent construction. Many of the newer neighborhoods are bright, shiny, and somewhat homogenous.

As far as the photo goes, I feel some clues about them seem disturbing. Before I continue, I want to emphasize the girls says the others treat her well. I don’t know what that entails exactly. The girl is the team’s Manager that helps with team functions and practices routines with the team. I am unclear what expectations were communicated to the girl and her family. It is common for team photos to include student helpers, managers, and assistants. I would be interested to see how other clubs in the school went about including team managers.

The photo analysis:
1. Two versions exist of the group, one with the girls and one without.
2. An adult or adults made this decision to have two versions.
3. Only the version without the girl made it to social media and the yearbook.
4. According to a report I read, yearbook affiliated people were only given the version without the girl.
5. Facial expressions in the photo with the girl shows 5 of the students not smiling as fully as the image without the girl. As someone that has taken pictures of thousands of people, I know a half baked smile when I see one. It is my speculation that some on the team knew ahead of time that two photos would be taken. Therefore, did not give their best effort. It is my conclusion that the girls took the lead of the adults in knowing “this one doesn’t count”. At least 5 of those faces say it all IMHO. I could be wrong and the photographer took a shot when all weren’t ready. Typically with cheer/pep people I have taken pictures of, didn’t need to much effort to elicit a beaming, “Ready for my closeup” smile.


I would trust your opinion as a photographer. What concerns me is that the "cheer" captain and her "popular friends" might of made this decision "behind the scenes" and most likely the coach never saw / knew what happened until the printing was done. I'd be willing to bet (I'm only assuming based on being an outcast and left out many times growing up) that this girl didn't fit their perfect image (in the eyes of whomever made this decision) and they made sure the yearbook committee did not ever receive the second photo with the girl or a handful of "cool kids" made sure the yearbook committee made the photo "vanish".

I'd love to know the whole story because maybe their is much more to it than cool kids making sure it didn't happen.

Quote
S. Pupp
I sympathize with her. It feels lousy to be excluded. As the only half-Asian student in my rural PA school, I was excluded entirely from my freshman yearbook. Well, not exactly; you can see 1/2 an inch of the side of my head in the one photo; they had me stand behind someone taller than I was. I'm not named in the photo.

I'm sorry this happened to you. I'm was just a middle class white kid but very excluded at times (not comparing myself to you but do know how it feels to be excluded at times). I look back in the 1980's and 1990's (Graduated in 1993) and we only had a handful of kids of other races at my school but I remember all of them being very nice. But, not 100% treated the same way.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: June 17, 2021 09:33AM
Without knowing for sure, it is possible the students were in on this. Ultimately it is on the adults to set this straight and they had several opportunities to do this.



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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Rick-o
Date: June 17, 2021 09:33AM
Quote
Sam3
Quote
Mr Downtown
Well . . . . maybe.

Seems she was an honorary member of the squad. You'll notice she doesn't have a uniform, for instance.

So they took photos both with her and without her. Which one to use in the yearbook? Seems like that could go either way, and no one needs to fire up the Outrage Machine.

Wow! That's cruel and heartless.

She was NOT an "honorary" member of the team. Did you even bother to read? She was team manager, she knew all of the routines.

Quote
sltrib.com
The first photo included Morgyn Arnold, a 14-year-old student with Down syndrome who’d been working as the cheer team manager and knew all the routines by heart.

Why did they take the second picture, without her, in the first place? Someone didn't like the fact that she's different?

Team managers are part of the team.

NO, it couldn't have gone either way, this is a clear case of discrimination.

And yes, there is every reason to fire up the Outrage Machine.

Absolutely THIS!!

I can't believe this young woman was treated so poorly. Some people suck so hard! smiley-talk034



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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: June 17, 2021 10:47AM
I am seeing this story hit NBC news, NYTimes, and Daily Mail. Anyone involved hoping this would just blow over is probably mistaken.



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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Diana
Date: June 17, 2021 11:13AM
Some things never change.

When you look back on it, the reason why things never change is because of @#$%& like this. The ADULTS in the room should have stood up and said "Not happening!"

My father was in the Navy when I was born, up in Massachusetts. A year later, my brother was born in Virginia. Dad got out of the Navy (this was the early '60s) and then tried to find a job that didn't take him so far from home. We went where the jobs were. I remember living in North Carolina, then South Carolina, then starting first grade in Georgia. That was the longest stint in one place that I can remember, some six years, until middle Georgia, then Utah, and ending in Oklahoma. Twelve different schools in twelve years of public schooling; one year I attended three different schools: I started in Utah, then came to Oklahoma, and as we needed to have a place to live we took a place close to Dad's work. The school district sucked mightily. After a week, Dad asked us "how do you like your school?" and the response was "whatever you do, please get me out of there." You see, a week in math class on the same subject; an English teacher trying to teach the basic structure of English (noun, verb, etc) and the students having no clue. When I answered a question the guy in front of me turned to me and asked "how do you know that?" I thought "HOW do you NOT?" but didn't say it. I wasn't learning anything.

So yes, I know what it's like being the outsider.

My time in Utah taught me a few things.

(a) Bullies can get away with a lot, as long as you don't stand up to them. And when you do, often times you get in trouble as you were the one caught. And yes, I stood up because nothing else was working and the harassment was getting intolerable. I got sent to the principals office, with the "we're calling your parents!" speech. Fine! When I explained to Mom, and then to Dad, the bullying problem didn't exactly resolve itself, but I was no longer a target.

(b) Outsiders are often taken as just that: outsiders. It doesn't matter if you try your best to blend in, you will still be an outsider. We went from middle Georgia where you knew your neighbors, came over to help in whatever way you could when someone was moving in, said hello and smiled at one another... to somewhere that people gave you side-eye and avoided you. In the year and a half we were there, it didn't change. This was back in the '70s. I came in thinking that your friends don't ask a lot from you, just you be you and be a friend, to leaving with a these-folks-only-wanted-something-from-me attitude. Sad.

While Oklahoma may be backward in a lot of areas, at least the people here are friendly (for the most part) and are willing to know/help their neighbors (for the most part). The high school social cliques still existed the same as everywhere else, it just didn't mean that much to me.

The yearbook should be reprinted at the school's expense, and everyone who purchased one should get a replacement free of charge. Use this as a "teaching moment" about inclusion. While I won't say that those responsible should be "hunted down and shot," I will say that those responsible should be disciplined. The two photos smacks of taking the real one for the yearbook, and a second one just to please the manager for now since nothing can be done after the yearbook has been published kind of thinking.

Diana
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: bazookaman
Date: June 17, 2021 12:12PM
This is some B U L L S H I T.



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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Thrift Store Scott
Date: June 17, 2021 12:20PM
Quote
pRICE cUBE
A few insights about this area. It is an expanding and fairly new part of Suburban Salt Lake City. It is a fairly affluent area. This land was formerly farm land that was created when the Great Salt Lake receded decades ago. Most of the homes are of recent construction. Many of the newer neighborhoods are bright, shiny, and somewhat homogenous.

As far as the photo goes, I feel some clues about them seem disturbing. Before I continue, I want to emphasize the girls says the others treat her well. I don’t know what that entails exactly. The girl is the team’s Manager that helps with team functions and practices routines with the team. I am unclear what expectations were communicated to the girl and her family. It is common for team photos to include student helpers, managers, and assistants. I would be interested to see how other clubs in the school went about including team managers.

The photo analysis:
1. Two versions exist of the group, one with the girls and one without.
2. An adult or adults made this decision to have two versions.
3. Only the version without the girl made it to social media and the yearbook.
4. According to a report I read, yearbook affiliated people were only given the version without the girl.
5. Facial expressions in the photo with the girl shows 5 of the students not smiling as fully as the image without the girl. As someone that has taken pictures of thousands of people, I know a half baked smile when I see one. It is my speculation that some on the team knew ahead of time that two photos would be taken. Therefore, did not give their best effort. It is my conclusion that the girls took the lead of the adults in knowing “this one doesn’t count”. At least 5 of those faces say it all IMHO. I could be wrong and the photographer took a shot when all weren’t ready. Typically with cheer/pep people I have taken pictures of, didn’t need to much effort to elicit a beaming, “Ready for my closeup” smile.


You make an excellent point in number 5. The smiles and poses are so similar on some of the girls between the two pictures that at first I thought the team captain had been PhotoShopped out of the picture rather than there having been two different pictures taken.



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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: bazookaman
Date: June 17, 2021 12:52PM
What about the girl thats missing in the second row, far right?

ah...nm. didn't see the whole pic.







Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/17/2021 12:55PM by bazookaman.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Acer
Date: June 17, 2021 01:57PM
From a purely visionary point of view, the "problem" is that she does not have a uniform, which breaks up the traditional "wall of uniforms" yearbook look. Team managers and coaches often don't dress, except perhaps in baseball. If they are in team photos, they often stand to the side or back row of the team. That's really what they should have done if they wanted to preserve the "wall of uniforms". The girl could have been in the picture in a way still acknowledging her role while the traditional wall of uniforms could have been preserved.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Mr Downtown
Date: June 17, 2021 04:20PM
We certainly are fortunate to have so many forum members who can look into the minds of other humans—people 1000 or 2000 or 5000 miles away—and determine without even the benefit of a doubt that their only motivation must have been an evil one.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: June 17, 2021 05:01PM
Quote
Mr Downtown
We certainly are fortunate to have so many forum members who can look into the minds of other humans—people 1000 or 2000 or 5000 miles away—and determine without even the benefit of a doubt that their only motivation must have been an evil one.


Everything I have said so far is noted as speculation based on my experiences in the news business and dealing with people. I grew up in the metro area where this happened and have a good read on SLC area communities. I believe the series of event that led to this seem to point to deliberate acts. One of other cheerleaders on the team also expressed her dismay that the girl was left out. She indicates that it seemed odd that two setups existed when they were taking the photos. The adults in charge appear to have been fine with this. I have not called for anyone's firing or loss of livelihood. I believe there are mechanisms to help make this student fee more included. Unless someone in the decision making steps up and offers an explanation, discussions like this will analyze the existing information and discuss it. It is human nature.



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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: btfc
Date: June 17, 2021 06:41PM
Quote
Mr Downtown
We certainly are fortunate to have so many forum members who can look into the minds of other humans—people 1000 or 2000 or 5000 miles away—and determine without even the benefit of a doubt that their only motivation must have been an evil one.


What exactly are you attempting to accomplish in this thread with your obviously false statements and aspersions?

We certainly are fortunate to have your oh so valuable and insightful input!
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Mr Downtown
Date: June 17, 2021 09:37PM
Quote
btfc
What exactly are you attempting to accomplish in this thread with your obviously false statements and aspersions?

I'm trying to persuade my fellow forum members not to make this into another Nick Sandmann (the MAGA-hatted Covington high schooler on the Mall with a smirk on his face) saga, where everyone jumps to the obvious—but totally wrong—conclusion.

Arnold was not one of the cheerleaders; she did not perform with them. She was the "cheer team manager," whatever that means. I don't know exactly what it meant to the team and other students; you don't know exactly what it meant to them. Undoubtedly the cheer team also has at least one faculty advisor, who was also not in the photo. Does that indicate that the yearbook staff (and their faculty advisors) wanted to erase the faculty member, or were embarrassed by her?

In a situation like this, the definition of who's "on the team" is situation-dependent, just as the definition of who belongs in a "family portrait" may change with marriages, divorces, and remarryings. Until there's evidence otherwise, I—just as a matter of philosophy—think it's best to assume that all involved had the best intentions, even if they reached a different decision than you think you would make.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Sam3
Date: June 18, 2021 07:32AM
Quote
Mr Downtown
Quote
btfc
What exactly are you attempting to accomplish in this thread with your obviously false statements and aspersions?

I'm trying to persuade my fellow forum members not to make this into another Nick Sandmann (the MAGA-hatted Covington high schooler on the Mall with a smirk on his face) saga, where everyone jumps to the obvious—but totally wrong—conclusion.

Arnold was not one of the cheerleaders; she did not perform with them. She was the "cheer team manager," whatever that means. I don't know exactly what it meant to the team and other students; you don't know exactly what it meant to them. Undoubtedly the cheer team also has at least one faculty advisor, who was also not in the photo. Does that indicate that the yearbook staff (and their faculty advisors) wanted to erase the faculty member, or were embarrassed by her?

In a situation like this, the definition of who's "on the team" is situation-dependent, just as the definition of who belongs in a "family portrait" may change with marriages, divorces, and remarryings. Until there's evidence otherwise, I—just as a matter of philosophy—think it's best to assume that all involved had the best intentions, even if they reached a different decision than you think you would make.

Except that your whole premise falls apart because there were two pictures taken, two setups done. This shows premeditation. There is no false conclusion. There are also the words of the girl, the girl's parents and some of the cheerleaders, that also differentiate this from the Sandmann case.





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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: June 18, 2021 09:00AM
The families of the included cheerleaders say they didn’t know two versions would lead to the one without the girl being used. They claim they would have advocated for the girl to be included. The adults that created this situation have yet to speak up and explain why this happened.



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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Mr Downtown
Date: June 18, 2021 09:24AM
The two setups would seem to support my analogy of "now a portrait of just the family members." They took photos both ways so they could decide later which one to use for various purposes, such as sending to competition publicity, selling to team members, posting in the trophy case, etc. One of those decisions would be which one to use in the yearbook.

None of the quotes I've read from team members, from Arnold or her parents, from school administrators give any credence to the theory that the choice was made because anyone was ashamed of Arnold or her participation. Quite the contrary, they all express affection for her, and show evidence of her acceptance by the other team members. The administrators have not said "oh, you caught us;" they've just said "we're looking into the issue."

Until there's evidence otherwise, I'll stick with my theory that this is some ginned-up Facebook Outrage being retroactively applied to perfectly understandable decisions by people who generally try to do the right thing.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: pRICE cUBE
Date: June 18, 2021 10:14AM
Quote
Mr Downtown
The two setups would seem to support my analogy of "now a portrait of just the family members." They took photos both ways so they could decide later which one to use for various purposes, such as sending to competition publicity, selling to team members, posting in the trophy case, etc. One of those decisions would be which one to use in the yearbook.

None of the quotes I've read from team members, from Arnold or her parents, from school administrators give any credence to the theory that the choice was made because anyone was ashamed of Arnold or her participation. Quite the contrary, they all express affection for her, and show evidence of her acceptance by the other team members. The administrators have not said "oh, you caught us;" they've just said "we're looking into the issue."

Until there's evidence otherwise, I'll stick with my theory that this is some ginned-up Facebook Outrage being retroactively applied to perfectly understandable decisions by people who generally try to do the right thing.


So far it appears that only one version was supplied for social media and the yearbook. Someone or a group of adults made multiple decisions that the one excluding the girl was the only one for public display. If the rest of the girls needed a picture as part of a competition, that’s one thing. The rest of the girls and their parents express support for the girl. That’s great. Still doesn’t answer why she would be left out of the yearbook image and not mentioned by name. It is a common practice to include support staff and students in club photos.



Ways to improve web conference image and sound quality. [forums.macresource.com]


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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Blankity Blank
Date: June 18, 2021 04:13PM
Such tap dancing to rationalize such an obvious stain. It at least provides a glimpse inside the kind of thinking that can see this as just fine.



National Suicide Prevention Hotline tel:1-800-273-8255

I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.
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Re: “ A Utah student with Down syndrome was left out of a photo of her school’s cheerleading squad “
Posted by: Bill in NC
Date: June 19, 2021 02:24PM
Quote
pRICE cUBE
The families of the included cheerleaders say they didn’t know two versions would lead to the one without the girl being used. They claim they would have advocated for the girl to be included. The adults that created this situation have yet to speak up and explain why this happened.

Yep, I bet the other team members & at least some of their parents would have chipped in to buy the manager a uniform f that's what was required for the best visual.
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