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cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: October 15, 2021 12:21PM
A close family member was released from the hospital after a stay of over a month. So I sent him this graphic:


He thought it was very funny...but half the family members and friends I shared it with gave me replies like "Really? A Nazi on a bike. How... nice."

Is it age? Is it culture? Is it gender? There seems to be a dividing line here.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/15/2021 12:22PM by Steve G..
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Paul F.
Date: October 15, 2021 12:25PM
It's "some people watch movies made before they were born, some don't".
One of my guilty pleasures is watching millennials "reacting" to movies I grew up with... Jaws, Star Wars, various Mel Brooks movies...
There's a common theme - They had "no idea a movie this old could be any good".

The Great Escape is worth watching, no matter what age one is.
But some people just can't wrap their head around watching a movie made before they were born.



Paul F.
-----
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca c. 5 BC - 65 AD
----
Good is the enemy of Excellent. Talent is not necessary for Excellence.
Persistence is necessary for Excellence. And Persistence is a Decision.

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Eureka, CA
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: neophyte
Date: October 15, 2021 12:27PM
I vote age. That movie is 58 years old, and that actor had his heyday about 50 years ago.
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Lew Zealand
Date: October 15, 2021 12:30PM
I never saw The Great Escape but I recognize Steve McQueen. Someone who knows neither could easily go down the Nazi assumption route. Hmmm, I may try this on the kids and see what they think...
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: SDGuy
Date: October 15, 2021 12:48PM
Quote
Paul F.
...some people just can't wrap their head around watching a movie made before they were born. are idiots

FTFY big grin smiley
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Paul F.
Date: October 15, 2021 01:18PM
Quote
SDGuy
Quote
Paul F.
...some people just can't wrap their head around watching a movie made before they were born. are idiots

FTFY big grin smiley

I'll accept that correction... winking smiley



Paul F.
-----
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca c. 5 BC - 65 AD
----
Good is the enemy of Excellent. Talent is not necessary for Excellence.
Persistence is necessary for Excellence. And Persistence is a Decision.

--

--

--
Eureka, CA
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Paul F.
Date: October 15, 2021 01:19PM
Quote
Lew Zealand
I never saw The Great Escape but I recognize Steve McQueen. Someone who knows neither could easily go down the Nazi assumption route. Hmmm, I may try this on the kids and see what they think...

Worth the time to watch. I watched it again last year some time, and it still holds up as a great movie.



Paul F.
-----
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca c. 5 BC - 65 AD
----
Good is the enemy of Excellent. Talent is not necessary for Excellence.
Persistence is necessary for Excellence. And Persistence is a Decision.

--

--

--
Eureka, CA
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: October 15, 2021 02:17PM
I was going to use this one...

...but it was a stunt double





Steve McQueen performed all of his own motorcycle stunts in The Great Escape with the exception of his characters final jump over a 6ft (1.8m) barbed wire fence. The final jump was performed by his stunt double, Bud Etkins.
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: TheCaber
Date: October 15, 2021 03:06PM
Watch Chicken Run(2000) for some Great Escape moments...



=TC
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: hal
Date: October 15, 2021 03:17PM
Old people surprised that younger people don't get their cultural references is such an old people thing...
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Ombligo
Date: October 15, 2021 03:26PM
About ten years ago I was repeatedly told by teachers that students would not watch a black & white movie. I decided to test that and take it even a step further.

I showed them the silent movie Modern Times with Charlie Chaplin. I had planned to show just the first half in the factory, but the next day they insisted on seeing the second part (which would be roundly condemned as socialist propaganda today)

So much for conventional wisdom.



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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: October 15, 2021 03:34PM
Yeah... I didn't get the reference. My immediate thought was "nutzy" too
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Paul F.
Date: October 15, 2021 04:04PM
Quote
TheCaber
Watch Chicken Run(2000) for some Great Escape moments...

The Great Escape, followed by Chicken Run is possibly one of the greatest double-features ever.



Paul F.
-----
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca c. 5 BC - 65 AD
----
Good is the enemy of Excellent. Talent is not necessary for Excellence.
Persistence is necessary for Excellence. And Persistence is a Decision.

--

--

--
Eureka, CA
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: DP
Date: October 15, 2021 05:41PM
I think some of you are missing SG's point. I have Jewish friends who would never even say words like "Nazi" or "Adolph Hitler"...





A throwback image to celebrate Autumn.

Disclaimer: This post is checked for correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Any attempts at humor are solely the responsibility of the author and bear no claim that any and all readers will approve or appreciate said attempt at humor.
My name is DP, and I approve this message.
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: October 15, 2021 06:26PM
Quote
Steve G.
He thought it was very funny...but half the family members and friends I shared it with gave me replies like "Really?...

Is it age? Is it culture? Is it gender?

"Really?" is not far from my first reaction.

Hilts got caught.

Shoulda' used James Coburn.



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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: JoeM
Date: October 15, 2021 07:15PM
I personally think it was a great idea! Tell everyone who had no clue to stay off your lawn!



JoeM
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: testcase
Date: October 16, 2021 12:22AM
MANY "old" movies are great (as long as you ignore the fact that EVERYBODY was smoking. I think even the dogs and cats were puffing away wink smiley ). About a year ago, the FRB's at Amazon Prime charged me me $3.99 + tax to stream "Robin Hood", a 70+ year old film featuring Errol Flynn and Maureen O'Hara. With NO CGI, good writing and acting had to carry a movie (NOT always the case lately). old fogey smiley
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: BernDog
Date: October 16, 2021 06:21AM
Quote
Steve G.
Is it age? Is it culture? Is it gender? There seems to be a dividing line here.

The dividing line here is whether someone has seen “The Great Escape” or not. Nothing more or less.
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Blankity Blank
Date: October 16, 2021 10:45AM
Age and culture?

I grew up watching (and loving) a ton of “old” movies.

But, would it have been the same if when I was growing up if I had dozens upon dozens of cable outlets to watch? Many of them with damn good contemporary content; good enough to sit down and watch for hours at a time.

If I’d also had video games that have as much, if not more, time, effort, passion and creativity poured into them as many Hollywood blockbusters?

And a device that literally fit in my pocket that let me carry much of the above with me wherever I went, and, as if that weren’t enough, also supplied a cornucopia of ways to engage with virtual social communities that literally stretch around the globe.

Old movies featuring dead people I’ve never heard of, in stories about times and places I know almost zero about? I’m not all that sure they’d get a chance if I were a Gen Fill-in-the- Letter.



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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Rolando
Date: October 16, 2021 12:18PM
I remember that scene and a few others from that movie. I saw it on TV as "Movie of the Week"!

Such a great movie, I immediately recognized that scene!



San Antonio, TX (in the old city)


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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Thrift Store Scott
Date: October 16, 2021 03:15PM
Going along with what Blankity Blank said, I had a discussion with someone about this subject just the other day.

Growing up before even cable in the 70s we had four channels, three of which would usually show an old movie or two to fill air time until sign-off after the ten o'clock news ended. Most of the time you had your choice of two old movies on different channels, often in black & white, or that you'd never heard of, or both, so you'd roll the dice and pick one. Most of them were actually very good, or at least bad enough that they were funny and enjoyable in ways not intended by the people who made them. That way you got to watch, enjoy, and come to appreciate old movies that you'd have never intentionally picked if given a broader selection, and your taste in films was expanded into genres and time periods in film history you'd have never noticed let alone explored on your own.

Not so people who grew up post-cable and especially post-internet.



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Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/16/2021 03:18PM by Thrift Store Scott.
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Re: cultural gap in perceiving graphic
Posted by: Ca Bob
Date: October 17, 2021 12:58PM
I just spent a week at the international silent film festival in Italy, so I guess that makes me somewhat on the edge of the curve. There are a lot of good films that are now around 100 years old, and some even older. My favorite Robin Hood is the 1922 Douglas Fairbanks classic, which premiered at Grauman's Egyptian theatre right after it was built. Pretty much everything Buster Keaton made in the silent era is good.

There was a comedy parody of a scene in The Great Escape where the Bronson character is parodied as saying, "I dug 17 tunnels -- with my face."

And of course Steve McQueen isn't a Nazi in the movie but an escaped American trying to make it out of Germany.
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