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Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: gadje
Date: February 11, 2024 08:41AM
[www.youtube.com]

Interesting how this showed up on my YouTube feed, I have no interest in such engines, but decided to watch it anyway. I enjoyed it more than I expected.

Is it really that cold? they way they are dressed doesn't seem to match my understanding of "cold weather".

And what about work safety? Fire? all those exposed belts? look towards the end when he coupled another belt to that mill.
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: kledo
Date: February 11, 2024 09:00AM
I can smell the diesel exhaust all the way here!
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: mstudio
Date: February 11, 2024 09:01AM
I had a VW diesel Rabbit I had to start like that when we still lived in Chicago.
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: MindMeld
Date: February 11, 2024 09:21AM
That's an amazing process. Kind of wish they had told what some of the steps were and their purpose.

Guess they don't have an equivalent watchdog like our OSHA.
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: macphanatic
Date: February 11, 2024 09:34AM
It’s an “unbelievable” way of staring a diesel in cold weather. My guess is they don’t have low paraffin diesel which negatively impacts cold weather starting.

And just because we have OSHA, don’t think that lots of sketchy stuff doesn’t happen in this country.
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: mrbigstuff
Date: February 11, 2024 09:56AM
You're correct, it's interesting! I love the fact that an ancient engine is still at work, that people keep fixing something that works for them.

I also love the pulley mechanism. Although those folks could use a tensioner on that main pulley.



Hurts like a bastid...
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: JoeH
Date: February 11, 2024 10:24AM
Not that unbelievable for an old "hot-bulb" engine, not a true diesel. Similar startup would be used to start in warmer conditions, just would take less time to heat up the hot-bulb to maintain firing for every compression stroke.
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: gadje
Date: February 11, 2024 11:40AM
"hot-bulb" engine, not a true diesel.

Interesting, I didn't hear about this type of engines. I was curious where is the cooling since I didn't see a radiator... I guess hot-bulb engines are different than modern engines? I need to learn more about this.
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: Ken Sp.
Date: February 11, 2024 12:37PM
Great video, thanks!
There is a great book about Rudolph Diesel and his mysterious death.
Of course, available, including audio on Amazon or [douglasbrunt-author.com]
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: JoeH
Date: February 11, 2024 12:45PM
They do not generate that much heat and power for their size, air-cooling of the exterior of the cylinder is sufficient. Compared to diesel they are fairly low compression in the 4-5:1 range. Can be adjusted to run on just about any liquid including low grade gasoline and bio-oils. Just needs some lubricating properties as the crank and piston lubrication comes from the fuel going through the crankcase. Ignition of the fuel comes from the red-hot bulb, fuel is introduced before compression and the compression stroke pushes enough air into the bulb to allow it to burn relatively completely.

They were made initially from steam engine designs starting in the late 1800s. Still being made into the 1940s and '50s. Ex's grandparents had a family camp in Maine that was a remaining portion of the family farm from the early 1900s. Still had a tractor powered by one of these engines that was used for brush cutting and similar chores around the camp. Probably still there, but no idea if still running. Last saw it used was about 20-25 years ago.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/11/2024 12:45PM by JoeH.
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: gadje
Date: February 11, 2024 02:10PM
comment seen: "But exposed pulleys and loose head scarfs don't mix."

yeah, I didn't even notice the scarfs, I was looking at the engine but man, looking again, all those scarfs, and loose sleeves and pants, seems like an accident about to happen...
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: mattkime
Date: February 11, 2024 03:09PM
I wonder how much horsepower is made and what it might look like to replace it with something more modern, electric or petrol powered.



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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: JoeH
Date: February 11, 2024 03:56PM
Probably in the 15 HP range, max RPMs in the 350-400 rpm range. Biggest issue besides better fuel being needed or electricity is speed reduction to the range needed for the equipment running off that belt drive.
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Re: Unbelievable Cold Weather Startup Of Diesel Engine
Posted by: Speedy
Date: February 11, 2024 09:55PM
Thanks!

Quote
JoeH
They do not generate that much heat and power for their size, air-cooling of the exterior of the cylinder is sufficient. Compared to diesel they are fairly low compression in the 4-5:1 range. Can be adjusted to run on just about any liquid including low grade gasoline and bio-oils. Just needs some lubricating properties as the crank and piston lubrication comes from the fuel going through the crankcase. Ignition of the fuel comes from the red-hot bulb, fuel is introduced before compression and the compression stroke pushes enough air into the bulb to allow it to burn relatively completely.

They were made initially from steam engine designs starting in the late 1800s. Still being made into the 1940s and '50s. Ex's grandparents had a family camp in Maine that was a remaining portion of the family farm from the early 1900s. Still had a tractor powered by one of these engines that was used for brush cutting and similar chores around the camp. Probably still there, but no idea if still running. Last saw it used was about 20-25 years ago.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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