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OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: graylocks
Date: December 17, 2005 10:27AM
i'm trying to figure out how to deal with many bags of yard waste. in previous years i mowed over the leaves to clean up the yard but after 11 years of that the lawn can use a good rake out and my son needs to burn off his hormonal bursts of energy.

my county does not pick up yard waste and i'd rather not pay to have these bags hauled away.

these brown yard bags are labeled suitable for composting so i'd love to think i could line them up by my fence, wet them, and eventually they will return themselves to mother nature. but i've done compost piles before and it has taken yard waste, organic matter, water and turning to get it going.

the bags say "suitable for composting" but are they referring to large land fills and not back yards?

btw, we're talking about 50 30 gallon bags...
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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: iaJim
Date: December 17, 2005 10:36AM
They will rot in time and return to the earth, so if you aren't worried about the aesthetics, putting them around the fence will work. They will rot sooner out of the bags, but then they might just blow away. Nature will take care of it in one way or another. Does your county provide a place you can drop off yard waste for free? That's what we do after our composting piles get full.
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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: graylocks
Date: December 17, 2005 10:48AM
iaJim Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Does your county provide a
> place you can drop off yard waste for free?
> That's what we do after our composting piles get
> full.

i don't know but it would be worth a call. of course, i'd have to talk my brother into lending me his F150.

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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: bill b
Date: December 17, 2005 11:21AM
Your town may have a compost pile usually twenty feet high by fifty feet wide byu very long.
They 'turn' the pile over several times a year with a bobcat or front end loader.
The bags rot. The turning accelerates it by keeping the bags in contact with wet "soil".
(they also get torn up in the process).
The bags DO take longer than leaves and lawn clippings and will take a really long time if stacked up in a row in your yard.
The parts of the paper that are in the air will dry and just weather.
The paper will need to stay wet to 'rot', so will still require turning.

Thrown in a heap would be faster.

You shouldn't have to do anything to get a compost pile 'going'.
Turning and watering just accelerates the process.


You'll have potential mice problems whatever you do.
Each of those bags can be a potential 'home', but, so can a pile.
Turning is a deterrant.

My piles (25 foot section of three feet high fence around in a circle) take two years to get worms in them, but I just water them. I don't have time turn them over but once a year. I'm also careful to mix leaves with the lawn clippings throughout the year so I don't get layers of nothing much happening.

Don't put a compost pile under a maple tree.

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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: malfunction
Date: December 17, 2005 01:20PM
Mowing over the leaves AND collecting them will speed up the process. The mixture of green (or nearly green) grass and leaves makes great compost material. Chopped up leaves compost a lot faster and won't blow around as much when piled up.

More effort usually means faster composting - that's the trade off.

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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: h'
Date: December 17, 2005 01:28PM
What malfunction said.
I don't know if you container garden, but I ended up using up all my bags of leaves and yard waste in the bottom 3/4 of the containers, with commercial garden mix (pro gro) on top-- saves a ton of money, and you just top off with more garden mix as it packs down.
Where do you keep 50 bags of leaves? Mine were in the garage but the moisture they gave off was causing my bikes to rust in there.



I suffer from the same sensitivity that you do. A few nuggets of wisdom were shared with me and I'm "trying" to incorporate them into my life. First, remember that nobody can hurt your feelings unless you let them. You can always reject what is being forced on you emotionally.
Second, nothing changes unless you change it. If you don't want the behavior to be repeated then you need to take action. Otherwise the kid has learned that his behavior is the way to get things done, because everyone lets him get away with it.
In the meantime I sympathize because I've been there.
-beerman
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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: graylocks
Date: December 17, 2005 01:41PM
if i mowed over them first, as i have for years, it would be cruel and unusual punished to have my son try to rake the bits and pieces up.

there's a small section of my yard where i want the weeds to stop growing. perhaps i'll pile some bags up over there and we'll see how many years it takes to decompose. sort of like a science experiment.

yes, what to do with 50 bags of leaves.

perhaps after my son rakes all the leaves up, i show him how to use the vacuum part of the blower to shred the leaves. yep, he does have to rake them up first, he can't vacuum them up. i'm also trying to tire the lad out.
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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: rgG
Date: December 17, 2005 01:53PM
Leaves make a great mulch. It whould be perfect to spread them out on that area where you want to smother the weeds. I would apread them really thick, without shreading, I'm too lazy, then cover with a layer of pine straw just to make them look nice. If you make them thick enough, you won't have any problem with weeds there for quite a while.

My mom has mulched with leaves for years. She gets the guys that pick them up for the city to bring them to her by the truck load. She spreads them, covers with pine straw, and it works like a charm. If you lived close enough to her, she would take them off your hands, and even come over to pick them up.





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: MitchJi
Date: December 17, 2005 02:37PM
Hi,

Remove them from the bags and make a pile. Save kitchen waste (no meat) and put it in a plastic garbage can, add a little water if necessary to keep it moist. When you have a good amount of kitchen waste remove some of the leaves on top, pour on the kitchen waste and put the leaves back. Within a day or two after adding the kitchen waste the pile will shrink by a significant percent.




Best Wishes,

Mitch
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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: graylocks
Date: December 17, 2005 02:39PM
If you lived close enough to her, she would take them off your hands, and even come over to pick them up.

well, if she's anywhere near the atlanta towns near the airport, she's welcome to 'em! we should have it all raked up by mid january.
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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: rgG
Date: December 17, 2005 02:46PM
graylocks,
Close but no cigar. My mom is about 45 miles SE of Athens in Washington, GA. so I think that might be a bit far for her.

I really think you should put them on that area with the weeds. It will save you a lot of money on "round-up".






Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: OT: Suitable for composting
Posted by: graylocks
Date: December 17, 2005 03:11PM
I really think you should put them on that area with the weeds. It will save you a lot of money on "round-up".

yes, i am going to do that for as many bags as that area can take. round-up ridiculously expensive given the size area i need it for.


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