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When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: PeterB
Date: December 22, 2005 05:28PM
... your salary requirements (as discussed earlier: [forums.macresource.com]) but also for your "salary history" -- what the heck is that?!?

Any consensus on the best way to deal with this? I really think it's absolutely NONE of their business...




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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: NewtonMP2100
Date: December 22, 2005 05:38PM
. . .

I don't think it is their business.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/22/2005 05:41PM by NewtonMP2100.
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: Racer X
Date: December 22, 2005 05:39PM
salary history is to see what you made in your former positions.

it can be very dangerous for them to know.

For example, my wife's title was head word processor, but her job description was that of a full-blown technical writer, and tech writers make 10-20K more.

so with her new job, they would have screwed her out of the pay she would be due because she would be considered a word processor, like at her last job. So she listed her job duties (and not title) , and they assumed she was a tech writer at her old job, and offered her a reasonable amount.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/22/2005 05:39PM by Racer X.
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: pinion
Date: December 22, 2005 05:40PM
A salary history is just that. A list of the different salaries you had from period to period.
i.e.
1999-2000 74,000
2000-2002 85,400

yadda yadda...

If you want the job you pretty much are going to have to give them one. It's something you should have with you anyway when you go on a interview because there is a good chance they are going to be asking for one. However it is not something you would just volunteer with your resume. Just hold on to it until they ask, just make sure you have one ready to go. Of course there is a lot of advice on Google. Feeling Lucky?
[www.jobweb.com]

<g> I can't wait until August when I'm going to be job hunting. sad smiley






---“What you permit, you promote. What you allow, you encourage. What you condone, you own.”
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: M A V I C
Date: December 22, 2005 06:01PM
Just a crazy idea, but ask the person who's asking for their salary history. If they try to say "you're the one being interviewed" point out to them you're interviewing them too, and anyone who isn't concerned about who they're going to be working for, probably wont work out for them in the long run.

That said, in this market, employers can pretty much ask for anything.




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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: JoeM
Date: December 22, 2005 06:13PM
Again, you have to give it, if you are applying online and if you want to be sure they will consider you. If it happens in the interview, and it's verbal, and you are good at manipulating conversations you can redirect them away.

You might fudge in your total compensation package rather than just salary (hey, you're just trying to comply and give them the MOST accurate information they really hav no right in asking for).

Sometimes they ask for your starting and ending salary. I never got my hopes up for a job that asked for all that stuff.



JoeM
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: Webster J. Duck
Date: December 22, 2005 06:25PM
I’ve never hired anyone without knowing their salary history. Our HR calls their HR and negotiations start from there. That’s not to say you can’t fight the system. Personally, if there was a disconnect between my history and what I intended on making I’d make that clear up front e.g. “you’ll see from my salary history I’ve been making $XXK, but my responsibilities and my anticipated function in this new position really merits $YYK. Obviously, I’m open to negotiation, but this represents my initial expectations”.

People have pushed me hard on salary in the past…sometimes I say thanks for your time, good luck to you and sometimes I fold and pony up more money. All depends on the individual’s value and the current job market. It’s good to know your own value in a given position.
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: Mike Johnson
Date: December 22, 2005 06:51PM
You know how much you're willing to accept, and they don't. If they make an offer and you can't find mutually agreeable terms, it's not the right job for you.

That said, I've never been in a position where I've been asked for a salary history. My gut reaction would be, I'll tell you what I made at my last job if you tell me how much you paid the employee I'd be replacing. That seems fair.
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: Webster J. Duck
Date: December 22, 2005 07:15PM
The bottom line is that people are hired to remove some type of burden (resource, competency etc…) from their hiring manager… otherwise there would be no reason to hire them. Establishing up-front that you’re going to BE a burden and a headache by clever answers to a very simple question ensures you won’t get the job. At least that’s my thoughts on the matter. I can’t imagine someone thinking, “great…this pain in the ass just wasted an hour of my time and potentially a day of my group’s time…I’ll hire him!”. Perhaps you’re some type of superstar a company needs at any cost, but I suspect most here, myself included, are competently mediocre.

Pushing for a higher starting salary leaves no hard feelings for me, even if painfully high. That’s the new employees right. They may or may not price themselves out of a job, but I don’t fault them for trying. Raising an issue over standard Industry practices would seem a superfluous lack of focus.


Edit: This is not addressed to anyone’s answer and no acrimony intended. I’ve just been in these situations and these were my thoughts at the time.




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/22/2005 07:22PM by Webster J. Duck.
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: hermes
Date: December 22, 2005 07:39PM
There are different kinds of relationships with employers from treating you like an object to treating you like one of the family. You have to work in that context first. If you and them hope to establish a trusting relationship then you have to trust one another. If on the other hand, like many interviews, you don't know what kind of relationship can be established. You can let them know that a relationship is being established a bit at a time. You can tell them you will supply information at a future time once they have owned up to their part of the relationship.

Even more importantly you have to consider which of two types of people you are interviewing with. HR just wants the facts like you are an object. The guy you will be working for wants to assess your long term potential and fit.

Always try to talk to people you will work for. If you are depending on coming in thru HR, then its probably a big company. They will treat you like objects and statistics. Then your only worry is if they will keep your information confidential because they could care less about you as a person.

Bottom line is you are in charge of your own information. Let them earn the right to possess that information. If you trust each other, info shared is good. If not, find a better employer.
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: RgrF
Date: December 23, 2005 01:28AM
It's a negotiating question, pure and simple. You provide them with a history of what you are use to and even if the job is worth more they'll bring the offer down to just a bit more than you had before.

Nothing fair about it, except for them. if you previously earned more than they are willing to pay for that position, it takes you out of play.

Hiring employees is a commodity game for most large employers.
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: Glued
Date: December 23, 2005 06:26AM
I've been told that in NY State, a potential employer is allowed to ask only two questions of an applicant's previous employer (by law): "Did the applicant work for you?" and "Would you hire them again?". They can't ask the previous employer what your salary was soooooooooooo - LIE. It's really none of their business and there's no way for them to confirm the amount so just bump it up.

That is, unless the place you're applying at is the I.R.S.
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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: bangman
Date: December 23, 2005 09:31AM
Common question in the entertainment industry, at least in the way that they'll ask what you got paid on your last gig.

It would seem weird giving a detailed account of all your years working.

"I was a lifeguard getting $6.00 an hour."



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Re: When a place asks not just for...
Posted by: trisho.
Date: March 03, 2006 07:12AM
I know this a really late response to this thread, but it's actually illegal for companies to ask for your salary history because it can promote discrimination, especially based on class, race or you just fell off the turnip truck.

Let's just say you worked as a Manager at Wal-Mart for 5 years in Florida {where wages are extremely depressed & low-balled}, and finally decided to move to New York City. A low-end manager with tons of responsibilities in a Florida Wal-Mart makes about $34,000/yr. If you is apply for a similar or better position at the new fancy Target in Brooklyn that pays about $58,000, you can see where this could be a problem.

This is similar to Racer X's wife's problem. Whenever I'm applying for a job where they request salary "history", I give them my salary "range" but don't correct on the illegal request though.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/03/2006 07:13AM by trisho..
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